The Jungle Book: Campfire Graphic Novel

Overview

The adventure begins the night a boy, Mowgli, escapes certain doom after being trapped in the perilous clutches of the tiger Shere Khan. To protect Mowgli and to defy the tiger, the Seeonee wolf pack adopts the boy, giving him the nickname "Man-Cub". Other animals--a panther, bear, and python--teach the boy how to survive as Shere Khan continually pursues him through the jungle. Eventually, Mowgli and Shere Khan square off in an epic battle, from which only one will survive. ...
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Overview

The adventure begins the night a boy, Mowgli, escapes certain doom after being trapped in the perilous clutches of the tiger Shere Khan. To protect Mowgli and to defy the tiger, the Seeonee wolf pack adopts the boy, giving him the nickname "Man-Cub". Other animals--a panther, bear, and python--teach the boy how to survive as Shere Khan continually pursues him through the jungle. Eventually, Mowgli and Shere Khan square off in an epic battle, from which only one will survive.

Presents the adventures of Mowgli, a boy reared by a pack of wolves, and the wild animals of the jungle. Also includes other short stories set in India.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This is a very good adaptation of Kipling's classic work. Tayal  . . . is an excellent choice for this book, where his cartoony stylings handle the animals and the animalistic side of Mowgli very well. . . . [Johnson's] abridgement is smoothly successful.  -- ICv2 (Four Stars)
Children's Literature - Sylvia Firth
Though these marvelous tales were written in Victorian times, they are still worthy of being read and enjoyed by today's youngsters. Fantasy is currently very popular with young readers and here are stories in this genre that are truly excellent. Father Wolf finds the baby Mowgli in the jungle. After being rescued from the terrible tiger, Shere Khan, he is taken in by the wolf pack and raised as one of them. Baloo the bear and Bhageera the panther also help rear Mowgli. Another fascinating tale tells of Kotick, a rare white seal who searches for a safe haven from the seal hunters. How elephants dance is recounted in "Toomai of the Elephants." The most well known of the tales is "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi." He is a mongoose who saves a boy named Teddy and his family from being killed by a pair of deadly cobras named Nag and Nagaina. This edition is enhanced with greatly detailed black and white illustrations that depict exciting events in most of the stories. All children should have access to this classic book, so purchase is suggested if a copy is not already in the collection. Reviewer: Sylvia Firth
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9788190751544
  • Publisher: Steerforth Press
  • Publication date: 1/31/2012
  • Series: Campfire Graphic Novels Series
  • Pages: 108
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 10.20 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Rudyard Kipling was born on 30th December 1865 in Bombay, India, to Alice and John Lockwood Kipling. When Kipling was six, he and his three-year-old sister went without their parents to live in Portsmouth, England, for six years, after which they moved back to India. Throughout his life Kipling travelled to many countries, including South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, America, and Japan. Kipling started his career in 1882 as assistant editor of the Civil & Military Gazette in Lahore, Pakistan. Besides writing articles, he was wrote many short stories for the newspaper. He married Carrie Balestier in London on in January of 1982. Their first child, Josephine, was born later that year.
     Kipling is regarded as one of the greatest British writers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Among his works are such classic novels as Captains Courageous and Kim; the short stories that make up The Jungle Book and The Second Jungle Book (including the Mowgli stories), Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, and The White Seal, and poems such as Mandalay and Gunga Din. He was the first English language recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907. Rudyard Kipling died on 18th January 1936 of a perforated duodenal ulcer. His ashes are buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey.
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Read an Excerpt

Mowg1i's Brothers

Now Chil the Kite brings home the night
That Mang the Bat sets free --
The herds are shut in byre and hut
For loosed till dawn are we.
This is the hour of pride and power,
Talon and tush and claw.
Oh, hear the call! -- Good hunting all
That keep the jungle Law!
Night Song in the Jungle

It was seven o'clock of a very warm evening in the Seeonee Hills when Father Wolf woke up from his day's rest, scratched himself, yawned, and spread out his paws one after the other to get rid of the sleepy feeling in their tips. Mother Wolf lay with her big gray nose dropped across her four tumbling, squealing cubs, and the moon shone into the mouth of the cave where they all lived. "Augrh!" said Father Wolf, "it is time to hunt again." And he was going to spring downhill when a little shadow with a bushy tail crossed the threshold and whined: "Good luck go with you, 0 Chief of the Wolves; and good luck and strong white teeth go with the noble children, that they may never forget the hungry in this world. "

It was the jackal -- Tabaqui the Dish-licker -- and the wolves of India despise Tabaqui because he runs about making mischief, and telling tales, and eating rags and pieces of leather from the village rubbish heaps. But they are afraid of him too, because Tabaqui, more than anyone else in the jungle, is apt to go mad, and then he forgets that he was ever afraid of anyone, and runs through the forest biting everything in his way. Even the tiger runs and hides when little Tabaqui goes mad, for madness is the most disgraceful thing that can overtake a wild creature. We call it hydrophobia,but they call it dewanee -- the madness -- and run.

"Enter, then, and look," said Father Wolf, stiffly, "but there is no food here."

"For a wolf, no," said Tabaqui, "but for so mean a person as myself a dry bone is a good feast. Who are we, the Gidur-log [the Jackal-People], to pick and choose?" He scuttled to the back of the cave, where he found the bone of a buck with some meat on it, and sat cracking the end merrily.

"All thanks for this good meal," he said, licking his lips. "How beautiful are the noble children! How large are their eyes! And so young too! Indeed, indeed, I might have remembered that the children of kings are men from the beginning."

Now, Tabaqui knew as well as anyone else that there is nothing so unlucky as to compliment children to their faces; and it pleased him to see Mother and Father Wolf look uncomfortable.

Tabaqui sat still, rejoicing in the mischief that he had made, and then he said spitefully:

"Shere Khan, the Big One, has shifted his hunting grounds. He will hunt among these hills for the next moon, so he has told me."

Shere Khan was the tiger who lived near the Wainganga River, twenty miles away.

"He has no right!" Father Wolf began angrily. "By the Law of the jungle he has no right to change his quarters without due warning. He will frighten every head of game within ten miles, and I -- I have to kill for two, these days."

"His mother did not call him Lungri [the Lame One] for nothing," said Mother Wolf, quietly. "He has been lame in one foot from his birth. That is why he has only killed cattle. Now the villagers of the Wainganga are angry with him, and he has come here to make our villagers angry. They will scour the jungle for him when he is far away, and we and our children must run when the grass is set alight. Indeed, we are very grateful to Shere Khan!"

"Shall I tell him of your gratitude?" said Tabaqui.

"Out!" snapped Father Wolf. "Out and hunt with thy master. Thou hast done harm enough for one night."

"I go," said Tabaqui, quietly. "Ye can hear Shere Khan below in the thickets. I might have saved myself the message."

Father Wolf listened, and below in the valley that ran down to a little river, he heard the dry, angry, snarly, singsong whine of a tiger who has caught nothing and does not care if all the jungle knows it.

"The fool!" said Father Wolf. "To begin a night's work with that noise! Does he think that our buck are like his fat Wainganga bullocks?"

"Hsh. It is neither bullock nor buck he hunts tonight," said Mother Wolf "It is Man." The whine had changed to a sort of humming purr that seemed to come from every quarter of the compass. It was the noise that bewilders woodcutters and gypsies sleeping in the open, and makes them run sometimes into the very mouth of the tiger.

"Man!" said Father Wolf, showing all his white teeth. "Faugh! Are there not enough beetles and frogs in the tanks that he must eat Man, and on our ground too!"

The Law of the jungle, which never orders anything without a reason, forbids every beast to eat Man except when he is killing to show his children how to kill, and then he must hunt outside the hunting grounds of his pack or tribe. The real reason for this is that man-killing means, sooner or later, the arrival of white men on elephants, with guns, and hundreds of brown men with gongs and rockets and torches. Then everybody in the jungle suffers. The reason the beasts give among themselves is that Man is the weakest and most defenseless of all living things, and it is unsportsmanlike to touch him. They say too -- and it is true -- that maneaters become mangy, and lose their teeth.

The purr grew louder, and ended in the full-throated "Aaarh!" of the tiger's charge.

Then there was a howl -- an untigerish howl -- from Shere Khan. "He has missed," said Mother Wolf "What is it?"

The Jungle Book. Copyright © by Rudyard Kipling. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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