The Kabbalah Code: A True Adventure by James Twyman | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Kabbalah Code: A True Adventure

The Kabbalah Code: A True Adventure

1.8 5
by James F. Twyman, Philip Gruber
     
 

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During the world premiere of The Moses Code movie, an angry audience member challenges James Twyman in a very unusual way. She says that his ideas surrounding the story of Moses and the name given to him by God, "I AM THAT, I AM," are incomplete. It wasn't a comma that unlocked the secrets of creation, but a Yud, the most

Overview

During the world premiere of The Moses Code movie, an angry audience member challenges James Twyman in a very unusual way. She says that his ideas surrounding the story of Moses and the name given to him by God, "I AM THAT, I AM," are incomplete. It wasn't a comma that unlocked the secrets of creation, but a Yud, the most sacred letter in the Hebrew alphabet (which looks very much like a comma).

Thus begins Twyman's quest to discover the true meaning of the Sacred Names of God, leading him to an adventure in Paris that changes his life forever.

Within these pages, James enters the world of the ancient Kabbalah, the mystical teachings of Judaism, and realizes that the rabbit hole goes far deeper than he thought. Join James and Phil Gruber-a friend and spiritual teacher who decides to initiate this incredible journey-as they travel to ten of the most sacred sites in Paris, unlocking the secrets found in the many Names of God and revealing lost teachings that may change the world. Written in the style of a high adventure such as The Da Vinci Code and The Celestine Prophecy, this is an unforgettable book that will draw you into a world of intrigue and Kabbalistic lore.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401940249
Publisher:
Hay House, Inc.
Publication date:
10/15/2012
Pages:
217
Sales rank:
1,128,850
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

James F. Twyman is an internationally renowned "Peace Troubadour" and the best-selling author of ten books, including Emissary of Light and The Moses Code. He's also the executive producer and co-writer of the feature film Indigo, and the director of Indigo Evolution.

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The Kabbalah Code: A True Adventure 2.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has nothing to do with the ancient wisdom of Kabbalah. To understand the codes you need to understand the Hebrew language because most of the deep meaning is lost in the translation. James understanding and perspective is very narrow. I hope he will do a deeper research and connect himself to a better source of knowledge and more authentic and qualified teachers for his next book. Swami Swaroopananda is neither Israeli, nor Jewish and his message is not of Kabbalah or Judaism I wouldn’t use him as a qualified source of knowledge
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JBray333 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading James Twyman's adventure into the Kabbalah. In easily understood language, he takes the reader on an adventure if mystery and intrigue in better understanding a complex concept. Hay House chooses its authors with care and this is no exception. I found this book entertaining and thought-provoking and recommend it for any beginning student of the Kabbalah.
ClioGK More than 1 year ago
I began reading "The Kaballah Code: A True Adventure" by James F. Twyman with Philip Gruber eagerly because I have had a life-long interest in religious history and had recently completed a short course in Kaballah. But I was quickly disenchanted. The first jolt came in the first chapter when Twyman revealed that in his first book "The Moses Code," he seems to have expected ancient Hebrew to include punctuation marks--commas. Visions of "The DaVinci Code" rose in my mind, as I followed the protagonists around famous landmarks of Paris, moving from statue to statue a la "Angels and Demons." Instead of following clues hidden in the art itself, we were unlocking the "code" hidden in ancient Hebrew names for God: Yahweh, El Shaddai, El Elyon,etc. At each venue, the chanting of the name led to an otherworldly experience. Now I find it important to say that no person can call another's religious revelation invalid--especially since communicating such an experience in words is nearly impossible. But I must tell Mr. Twyman that "Tetragrammaton" is not a name of God. It is a term for the four unpronounced consonants that stand for the Name.