The Kids' Book of Weather Forecasting: Build a Weather Station, "Read" the Sky & Make Predictions!

Overview

Weather is always something everyone can talk about. This fascinating introduction to weather, another title in the Williamson's Kids Can! series, is guaranteed to provoke interesting conversations. Breen, a meteorologist, began his career because of a snowstorm. As a child, he was intrigued by the snowdrift in his backyard that was so large he and his siblings spent days tunneling through it.

This fact-filled book is arranged in eight chapters, and guides the reader through the...

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Overview

Weather is always something everyone can talk about. This fascinating introduction to weather, another title in the Williamson's Kids Can! series, is guaranteed to provoke interesting conversations. Breen, a meteorologist, began his career because of a snowstorm. As a child, he was intrigued by the snowdrift in his backyard that was so large he and his siblings spent days tunneling through it.

This fact-filled book is arranged in eight chapters, and guides the reader through the observation process. Instructions for keeping a weather log and the importance of detailed, accurate records is explained. Directions for making and using simple weather instruments are found throughout the text. Included are the anemometer, which measures wind speed; the barometer; the Beaufort scale spinner, measuring how hard the wind is blowing; and the hair hygrometer, which measures the humidity using a strand of hair. Instructions are also given for making the psychrometer, a rain gauge and a windvane.

Throughout the book are other features, such as "Quick-Take Forecasts" and weather questions and answers. Question: it's a beautiful sunny day, and a picnic is planned. The barometer is falling. Will it stay sunny? Answer: not likely. Falling pressure indicates a storm is approaching. "Ask Mark" includes questions that Breen answers, some personal, such as Breen's favorite season (all of them as they make his job interesting), others practical, such as why does a summer temperature of ninety degrees seem so much hotter in Tennessee than in Arizona (the relative humidity is the difference). "Weather Records" offers interesting facts about the weather, such as the longest drought on record lasted 400 years in Atacama, Chile. Charts showing wind chill, relative humidity, a key for cloudwatchers and the Beaufort scale are included.

This is an enjoyable book to read and difficult to put down. It is filled with information that keeps the reader interested. "The Weatherman's Song," words and lyrics by Breen, and resources such as other weather titles, weather organizations, and Websites on the Internet devoted to weather are included.

Although written for children, anyone with an interest in weather will enjoy it. Teachers will find this book a welcome addition to the science program.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-In this lively book, readers are encouraged to use their powers of observation and some homemade equipment to become weather forecasters. Directions for making related tools from easy-to-find materials appear throughout the text, and include a barometer, a weather-observation log, a wind vane, a Beaufort Scale, and a hygrometer. The authors explain how to convert temperatures from Celsius to Fahrenheit and how to predict the temperature by counting cricket chirps. Sections called "Ask Mark," "weather lore," and "quick-take forecasts" reinforce the scientific principles under discussion and mention some of the myths of weather prediction such as Groundhog Day. A useful, accessible book illustrated with black-and-white diagrams and cartoons.-Kathryn Kosiorek, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Brooklyn, OH Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
From The Critics
Weather is always something everyone can talk about. This fascinating introduction to weather, another title in the Williamson's Kids Can! series, is guaranteed to provoke interesting conversations. Breen, a meteorologist, began his career because of a snowstorm. As a child, he was intrigued by the snowdrift in his backyard that was so large he and his siblings spent days tunneling through it. This fact-filled book is arranged in eight chapters, and guides the reader through the observation process. Instructions for keeping a weather log and the importance of detailed, accurate records is explained. Directions for making and using simple weather instruments are found throughout the text. Included are the anemometer, which measures wind speed; the barometer; the Beaufort scale spinner, measuring how hard the wind is blowing; and the hair hygrometer, which measures the humidity using a strand of hair. Instructions are also given for making the psychrometer, a rain gauge and a windvane. Throughout the book are other features, such as "Quick-Take Forecasts" and weather questions and answers. Question: it's a beautiful sunny day, and a picnic is planned. The barometer is falling. Will it stay sunny? Answer: not likely. Falling pressure indicates a storm is approaching. "Ask Mark" includes questions that Breen answers, some personal, such as Breen's favorite season (all of them as they make his job interesting), others practical, such as why does a summer temperature of ninety degrees seem so much hotter in Tennessee than in Arizona (the relative humidity is the difference). "Weather Records" offers interesting facts about the weather, such as the longest drought on record lasted 400years in Atacama, Chile. Charts showing wind chill, relative humidity, a key for cloudwatchers and the Beaufort scale are included. This is an enjoyable book to read and difficult to put down. It is filled with information that keeps the reader interested. "The Weatherman's Song," words and lyrics by Breen, and resources such as other weather titles, weather organizations, and Websites on the Internet devoted to weather are included. Although written for children, anyone with an interest in weather will enjoy it. Teachers will find this book a welcome addition to the science program.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780824968229
  • Publisher: Williamson Books
  • Publication date: 8/28/2008
  • Series: Kids Can! Ser.
  • Pages: 141
  • Age range: 7 - 11 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.60 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2006

    I can't wait to use this in my classroom...

    I'm a future teacher, and I plan on using this handy little book in my classroom one day! It's jam-packed with easy to understand information on complex weather ideas--in fact, some things have finally clicked for me! It has tons of fun ideas for make-at-home projects and really neat weather-related science experiments. This book is also great for cross-curriculum units such as history (facts about who discovered Greenland and why it's icy there) and English (weather poems by Emily Dickinson), and of course, math (converting temperature scales). I'd give it an A+!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2004

    great book for my future weathergirl

    My daughter is 6 years old. We bought this book for her, and she loves it! I think putting a 12 year old age recommendation on it a little far fetched, I think kids of all ages would enjoy this book. Perhaps they think 6 year olds are slow readers. We even had fun with our 4 year old using this book. It's a great learning tool for the kids and there are great activities to do as a family in it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2009

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