The Killing Zone: How and why Pilots Die

The Killing Zone: How and why Pilots Die

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by Paul A. Craig
     
 

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This literal survival guide for new pilots identifies "the killing zone," the 40-250 flight hours during which unseasoned aviators are likely to commit lethal mistakes. Presents the statistics of how many pilots will die in the zone within a year; calls attention to the eight top pilot killers (such as "VFR into IFR," "Takeoff and Climb"); and maps strategies for

Overview

This literal survival guide for new pilots identifies "the killing zone," the 40-250 flight hours during which unseasoned aviators are likely to commit lethal mistakes. Presents the statistics of how many pilots will die in the zone within a year; calls attention to the eight top pilot killers (such as "VFR into IFR," "Takeoff and Climb"); and maps strategies for avoiding, diverting, correcting, and managing the dangers. Includes a Pilot Personality Self-Assessment Exercise that identifies pilot "types" and how each type can best react to survive the killing zone.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780071362696
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
Publication date:
12/12/2000
Edition description:
BK&CD ROM
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.11(d)

Meet the Author

Paul A. Craig, Ed.D., longtime pilot, FAA award-winning flight instructor, and aviation educator and author, designed and conducted the research described in this book based on his lifelong concern with the high accident rate among general aviation pilots, and in the process of earning his doctorate in education, with special empahsis on pilot decision-making and flight training.

A Gold Seal Multiengine Flight Instructor and twice FAA District Flight Instructor of the Year, he has spoken widely to flight instructors and others on improving flight training and safety. He is the author of Be a Better Pilot; Stalls & Spins; Multiengine Flying, 2nd Edition; and Light Airplane Navigation Essentials, all from McGraw-Hill's renowned Practical Flying Series.

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The Killing Zone: How and why Pilots Die 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first part of the book shows the statistics gathered to define the killing zone. This first part of the book is really boring and seems as if Craig is trying to say that you are more likely to get killed flying, than driving. The body of the book is where it gets interesting. As a student pilot that has not yet flown through the killing zone this educational section of the book was really helpful. Crag breaks the body chapters in to 12 problem areas, each chapter explaining how to prevent and recover from each problem. The one major thing that Craig did not refer to very much in the book is human factors or human errors. I was told from a ground school instructor that 65% of all general aviation accidents involved some type of pilot error. Something this significant should have been mentioned in the book. Over all this is a really good book for student pilots. It will be one of my many reference materials as I fly through the killing zone.