King of Distortion Meets the Red Line Rebels

The King of Distortion Meets the Red Line Rebels

by Link Wray
     
 

Link Wray didn't invent the notion of rock & roll guitar, but he sure changed it around when he scored his first hit in 1958. "Rumble" was a tune short on flash and long on menace, with the fierce growl of Wray's distorted guitar hovering over a slow, deliberate rhythm; the fuzzy report of Wray's axe was a far cry from the clean dexterity of the country-influenced…  See more details below

Overview

Link Wray didn't invent the notion of rock & roll guitar, but he sure changed it around when he scored his first hit in 1958. "Rumble" was a tune short on flash and long on menace, with the fierce growl of Wray's distorted guitar hovering over a slow, deliberate rhythm; the fuzzy report of Wray's axe was a far cry from the clean dexterity of the country-influenced pickers who dominated rock & roll's earliest days, and nearly every hard rock, punk, or metal guitarist owes a debt of influence to Wray's minimalistic thunder. Wray gets top billing, and rightly so, on the compilation The King of Distortion Meets the Red Line Rebels, but here Wray's presence serves as a jumping-off point for a brief history of guitarists who were willing to step up with something bolder and wilder than their peers. After eight classic tracks from Link Wray -- including "Rumble," "Raw-Hide," and "Jack the Ripper" -- The King of Distortion veers into an eclectic survey of jazz, blues, and rock guitarists who weren't afraid to push the stylistic envelope, from Charlie Christian, Django Reinhardt, and T-Bone Walker to Dick Dale, Paul Burlison (with Johnny Burnette & the Rock 'n' Roll Trio), and Willie Johnson (with Howlin' Wolf). The focus of this set is a bit foggy, given the way it jumps from being a Link Wray retrospective into an overview of a bunch of guitarists with divergent styles and approaches. But for pure listenability, this more than makes the grade; every track here is memorable, and plenty are stone classics that sound just as raw and satisfying as when they first hit jukeboxes back in the day. If you like your guitars to sound loud, proud, and dirty, The King of Distortion Meets the Red Line Rebels will introduce you to the key players in the noble heritage of fuzz, and it's a righteous, rootsy hoot throughout.

Read More

Product Details

Release Date:
05/21/2013
Label:
Righteous
UPC:
5013929986923
catalogNumber:
2998692
Rank:
5881

Tracks

  1. Rumble  -  Link Wray & His Wraymen
  2. Raw-Hide  -  Link Wray & His Wraymen
  3. Comanche  -  Link Wray & His Wraymen
  4. Slinky  -  Link Wray & His Wraymen
  5. Mary Ann  -  Link Wray & His Wraymen
  6. Jack the Ripper  -  Link Wray & His Wraymen
  7. El Toro  -  Link Wray & His Wraymen
  8. Poppin' Popeye  -  Link Wray & His Wraymen
  9. Solo Flight  - Charlie Christian
  10. Topsy  - Django Reinhardt
  11. T-Bone Jumps Again  - T-Bone Walker
  12. Rock a While  - Goree Carter
  13. Boogie In the Park  - Joe Hill Louis
  14. Moanin' At Midnight  - Howlin' Wolf
  15. Rocket 88  -  Jackie Brenston & His Delta Cats
  16. Cotton Crop Blues  - James Cotton
  17. The Things That I Used To Do  - Eddie Jones
  18. Space Guitar  - Johnny "Guitar" Watson
  19. Maybellene  - Chuck Berry
  20. Blues In the Night  - Chet Atkins
  21. The Train Kept a-Rollin'  -  Johnny Burnette & the Rock 'n' Roll Trio
  22. Mule Train Stomp  - Roy Buchanan
  23. Don't Worry  - Marty Robbins
  24. Ruby Baby
  25. 2000 Pound Bee, Pt. 1  -  Ventures
  26. The Jam, Pt. 1  -  Bobby Gregg & His Friends
  27. Misirlou  - Dick Dale

Read More

Album Credits

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >