The King's Coat (Alan Lewrie Naval Series #1)

( 13 )

Overview

The very first Alan Lewrie naval adventure in this classic series is now back in print!

1780: Seventeen-year-old Alan Lewrie is a brash, rebellious young libertine. So much so that his callous father believes a bit of navy discipline will turn the boy around. Fresh aboard the tall-masted Ariadne, Midshipman Lewrie heads for the war-torn Americas, finding--rather unexpectedly--that he is a born sailor, equally at home with the randy pleasures of the port and the raging battles on...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)
$7.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (32) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $4.30   
  • Used (20) from $1.99   
The King's Coat (Alan Lewrie Naval Series #1)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.99
BN.com price

Overview

The very first Alan Lewrie naval adventure in this classic series is now back in print!

1780: Seventeen-year-old Alan Lewrie is a brash, rebellious young libertine. So much so that his callous father believes a bit of navy discipline will turn the boy around. Fresh aboard the tall-masted Ariadne, Midshipman Lewrie heads for the war-torn Americas, finding--rather unexpectedly--that he is a born sailor, equally at home with the randy pleasures of the port and the raging battles on the high seas. But in a hail of cannonballs comes a bawdy surprise. . . .

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Comparisons will be made between Midshipman Alan Lewrie and Forester's Horatio Hornblower, but this auspicious beginning of a series has a very modern sensibility. In 1780, at the age of 17, our hero, bastard son of Sir Hugo Willoughby, is already a practicing rake in London. Caught in flagrante with his sluttish half-sister, he is banished to the Navy in a nasty ploy by Sir Hugo to rob the boy of his inheritance. During Alan's year on the 64-gun Adriadne , on the American-built schooner Parrot and on the frigate Desperate , he becomes an adept, even valiant sailor. There are foes at sea (a snotty fellow midshipman, a sanctimonious captain, American rebels) and ashore (Sir Hugo and minions), but there are also friends, notably Lt. Kenyon, skipper of the Parrot , and Lucy Beauman, beautiful niece of an admiral. Lambdin's crisp, gory action scenes possibly are marred for landlubbers by heavy nautical jargon, but graphic ribaldry involving a couple of older ladies needs no translation. (June)
Library Journal
Lambdin's Alan Lewrie stacks up well with C.S. Forester's Hornblowe r and Alexander Kent's Bolitho as a fictional naval officer. In this first novel, Lewrie, at 17, is unwillingly made a midshipman in the British navy of 1780. He sails first in a ship-of-the-line, later in a schooner, and finally a frigate. Storms, battles, duels, and difficulties begin to change him from a spoiled fop into a competent officer who is slowly coming to take pride in his hard service. Lambdin makes his character very human and believable. Questions about his background and prospects are left intriguingly unanswered. Lambdin also demonstrates a good enough grasp of sailing and 18th-century sea warfare to satisfy readers of this genre, who are quick to catch any mistakes. A good yarn that promises to become a good series.-- C. Robert Nixon, M.L.S., Lafayette, Ind.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780449003602
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 7/28/1998
  • Series: Alan Lewrie Naval Series , #1
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 222,224
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.90 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Dewey Lambdin, a self-described navy brat, has been a sailor since 1976, with a special taste for cruising the Gulf of Mexico in his sloop. He is the author of seven Alan Lewrie novels: The King's Coat, The French Admiral, The King's Commission, The King's Privateer, The Gun Ketch, H.M.S. Cockerel, and A King's Commander. A member of the Naval Institute, Dewey Lambdin makes his home in Nashville, Tennessee.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 30, 2012

    I'm about halfway through Lambdin's entire series, so I'm either

    I'm about halfway through Lambdin's entire series, so I'm either enjoying it or I'm a glutton for punishment. Sometimes I'm not sure which...

    First of all, the sexual content is a bit too graphic for a series in this genre, enough so that the sex scenes are a little disconnected at times from the rest of the narrative. I'm not a prude, but if I want pizza I'll go to a pizza joint, if I want steak I'll go to a steakhouse. This is kind of like picking up a Hornblower novel and finding pages from "Penthouse forum" randomly inserted throughout the text. I don't think it works as literature as well as the author seems to think it does.

    Lambdin's other problem is that he tries to write regional dialects phonetically, with the result being that some of his characters are nearly incomprehensible in print form. Large portions of his dialogue are really difficult to decode, not so much in this first book but as the series progresses. Also, in trying to prove how "salty" he is, Lambdin uses so much sailor jargon in his descriptive passages that it's sometimes difficult to understand what exactly is going on.

    The above having been said, he tells a pretty good story and if you're looking for something in the fighting sail genre and have already finished Forester, Pope, Kent, and O'Brien, he may be worth a try. I would definitely not get this book for my middle-schooler, though.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2006

    Good high seas adventure

    I have read Forrester and Patrick O'Bryan. Alan Lewrie is much more real and multidemensional. The fear of climbing to the masthead for the first time before safety lines, crash helmets and safety inspectors really effected me. Taking in a reef in a Gale will henceforward have more meaning. Alan's duel with cutlasses was very real. I am sure walking away would have been a better option today but not in 1781.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2013

    Missed this one

    I found that I had missed reading this the first book in the series. Shame on me. It is every bit as good as the others. If you like C.F.Foster and find O'Brian as boring as watching paint dry than Lambdon is the author you have been waiting for. If you have ever asked yourself WWLD (What Would Lewrie Do) and you are not in jail, then you did not follow his advise. Well worth your time and money to pick this one up.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2013

    Terrible

    An utterly loathsome protagonist, nonsensical plot, and juvenile writing skills. I'll keep looking for an author to supplement O'Brien in my library- this one certainly won't be in it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2013

    Faty

    Id say so

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2013

    Sam

    Oh well, wussup?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2012

    Rip roaring Nautical Adventure

    Think of Hornblower, or Aubrey, with more sea battles, more historical involvement, and lots of womanizing. Very enjoyable!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)