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The King's Sword
     

The King's Sword

4.3 3
by CJ Brightley
 

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A disillusioned soldier. A spoiled, untried prince. A coup that threatens the country they love.

When retired soldier Kemen finds the young prince Hakan fleeing an attempted assassination, he reluctantly takes the role of mentor and guardian. Keeping the prince alive is challenging enough. Making him a man is harder.

As usurper Vidar tightens his grip

Overview

A disillusioned soldier. A spoiled, untried prince. A coup that threatens the country they love.

When retired soldier Kemen finds the young prince Hakan fleeing an attempted assassination, he reluctantly takes the role of mentor and guardian. Keeping the prince alive is challenging enough. Making him a man is harder.

As usurper Vidar tightens his grip on power, Kemen wrestles with questions of duty and honor. What if the prince isn’t the best ruler after all?

Invasion looms, and Kemen’s decisions will shape the fate of a nation. What will he sacrifice for friendship and honor?

Product Details

BN ID:
2940044360150
Publisher:
CJ Brightley
Publication date:
02/06/2013
Series:
Erdemen Honor , #1
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
765,384
File size:
396 KB

Meet the Author

C. J. Brightley lives with her husband and young children in Northern Virginia. Her writings include essays, short stories, novellas, novels, and poetry.

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The King's Sword 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
gaele More than 1 year ago
Kemen is very well developed and voiced, without coming across as perfect: he has flaws and regrets, with a tinge of bitterness all making him more human and relatable.  The character of Hakan was less likable, but did show growth and development as the story progressed, despite his many flaws.   C.J. Brightley has a talent for developing characters that retain a sense of relatable humanity, even in worlds and situations that are far removed from those readers know.  Interesting to me was the inclusion of some ‘less desirable’ traits of humanity: racism, sexism, factions, war and even poverty: these helped to ground the setting in the familiar even as the lush descriptions of landscapes and places gave it a unique and singular feel.   This is an epic fantasy that initially felt more (to me) like historical fiction, until the world building / referential commentary stepped in and stopped that flow.  While it wasn’t highly distracting, there was a great difference in forward motion and pacing in the half, versus the last half of the book.   While much of the information was fitting both for main character, and provided insight into his knowledge and dedication as he was concerned with protecting and training the prince, it often felt as if there was too much information.   Overall, I did enjoy this book very much: even as it was not in a genre that I read more for pleasure than review, and I believe that fans of epic fantasies will truly adore this author’s writing and the world / quest / challenges she has created.   I received an eBook copy from the author for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. 
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Lit Amri for Readers' Favorite “I crossed his tracks not far outside of Stonehaven, and I followed them out of curiosity, nothing more. By the irregularity of his trail, I imagined he was some foolish city boy caught out in the cold and that he might want some help ... In less than a league, I found him lying face down in the snow.” Retired soldier Kemen Sendoa finds himself serving the kingdom of Erdem again by protecting the fugitive Prince Hakan Ithel, as well as teaching him the art of combat and the values that would make him a good king. However, the task of putting Hakan back on the throne is perilous and doubtful. The King's Sword (Erdemen Honor, Book 1) by C.J. Brightley is a solid fantasy story free from magical elements and leaning more toward the familiar medieval era. As a fantasy fan, I find this kind of world building a refreshing change once in a while. The narration is not heavy with ‘old world’ intonation and terminology. Told in a first person POV through the protagonist Kemen, it’s easily grasped and straightforward. Brightley’s prose is clear cut yet still has some impressive flair in it. The descriptions of the surroundings and scenes are vivid and filled with geographical details. There are times when this aspect slows down the pace of the plot, but this is merely a minor issue. On the whole, this is a solid start for the series. I look forward to seeing how the story continues.
AmyBrantley More than 1 year ago
A wonderful read for fantasy fans. As someone who's read fantasy for most of her life, I really enjoyed this read. I like that the author takes the time to create well-developed characters and sets up a strong world that is open for many more books. If you're the type that likes to get lost in a book for hours at a time, you'll love this book.