The Kite Runner (10th Anniversary)

( 50 )

Overview

The 10th anniversary edition of the New York Times bestseller and international classic loved by millions of readers.

The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father's servant, The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption; and an...

See more details below
Paperback (10th Anniversary Edition)
$10.77
BN.com price
(Save 32%)$16.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (86) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $6.29   
  • Used (74) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

The 10th anniversary edition of the New York Times bestseller and international classic loved by millions of readers.

The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father's servant, The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption; and an exploration of the power of fathers over sons—their love, their sacrifices, their lies.

A sweeping story of family, love, and friendship told against the devastating backdrop of the history of Afghanistan over the last thirty years, The Kite Runner is an unusual and powerful novel that has become a beloved, one-of-a-kind classic.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Novels about a young Pashtun boy in Kabul and his father's servant's son are not generally expected to become runaway word-of-mouth bestsellers, but Khaled Hosseini's The Kite Runner did exactly that when it was first published in 2003. The 10th anniversary paperback edition contains a new foreword by the author. If you haven't yet read it; now is the time.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781594631931
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/5/2013
  • Edition description: 10th Anniversary Edition
  • Edition number: 10
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 173
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Khaled Hosseini was born in Kabul, Afghanistan, and moved to the United States in 1980. He is the author of the New York Times bestsellers The Kite Runner, A Thousand Splendid Suns, and And the Mountains Echoed. He is A U.S. Goodwill Envoy to the United Nations Refugee Agency, and the founder of The Khaled Hosseini Foundation, a nonprofit that provides humanitarian assistance to the people of Afghanistan.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Sunnyvale, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 4, 1965
    2. Place of Birth:
      Kabul, Afghanistan
    1. Education:
      B.S. in biology, Santa Clara University, 1988; M.D., UC San Diego School of Medicine, 1993
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 50 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(19)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 1, 2013

    When Afghanistan went to war and was saved by the Taliban who tu

    When Afghanistan went to war and was saved by the Taliban who turned out to be just as bad, Amir Agha and his father Baba moved to America. They had trouble when they moved and went through changes which eventually made them better people. When they lived in Afghanistan Amir grew up with a boy named Hassan and his father Ali, their Hazara servants. Amir and Hassan grew up as best friends or so Hassan, the kite runner, thought. Because they were fed from the same breast, an extreme consequence was hidden deep in ones thoughts after an event to horrible to watch was reaveled . But in that exact sentence is a hidden secret that would have changed their lives if it they would have known at a young age. Unfortunately the information came too late. The secrets that were kept were so very important that without them the end never would have been. There was this one boy named Assef; he and his friends tormented the neighborhood kids and eventually become an essential part of the story. Then without warning contributed to the twist ending that excites the readers with amazement and wonder. Without that wonder and without Assef becoming an important part of the plot, one of our themes never would have been relevant; Stand up for yourself and others. This is a very good life story along with if you can’t stand up for yourself you’ll never stand up for others. Something was promised to be done and ends up being lived through by another very closely related. The book has a very exciting and intriguing climax and will blow your socks off. If you are only for a certain religion and don’t like reading about someone taking place in another religion or praying and practicing another religion then the book is not a top choice for you to read. Despite the religious content the book is astoundingly intriguing and contains life lessons that everyone should learn even the wisest of us all. Another theme is life can be cruel and forgiving if you don’t forget or give up. The biggest lesson to be learned from the exciting twist ending is no matter what has happened and what you’ve done you can still redeem yourself. Never give up is another moral that is pertaining to the book The Kite Runner.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2014

    Really a well written, beautiful story. It really gave me a lot

    Really a well written, beautiful story. It really gave me a lot of understanding about middle eastern culture. A 
    heart wrenching story of friendship, family, betrayal, and redemption. A must read. I'd say mature teenagers 
    older, as some of the content is pretty intense and disturbing. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2014

    I had to read this book as part of my summer reading and I can h

    I had to read this book as part of my summer reading and I can honestly say that it is one of the best books I have read so far. I thought I was not going to like it because the description says that it deals with the country's political standings at the time and redemption and such (which may sound boring), but it was actually great. The first few chapters are not that interesting since they are describing the background and such, but as you go more in depth in the book, you grow to love it. I loved it so much that I read it again and even did my Individual Oral Presentation on this novel. After you finish reading it, you can watch the movie (dont watch the movie before you finish reading the book, because the movie is not as amazing as the book and it leaves many vital parts out).
    Overall, I would definitely recommend this book to everyone because of the successful job that Hosseini does when he mixes historical information, issues between father and son, and a friendship that leads to betrayal and later the search for redemption.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2014

    When I started reading this book for an assignment in college, i

    When I started reading this book for an assignment in college, it took me at least three times to actually pick it up and read it. When I was finally forced by a deadline to pick it up and read it in its entirety , it was a very slow read. I did enjoy the Afghani history that was weaved into the story, but Amir was so unlikable, and its really hard to get into a book when you almost hate the main character. I can appreciate the novel for the points it was trying to get across, but if I had the choice , I wouldn't of read it. I could of just researched Afghanistan's history and left Amir out of it. The only reason I am giving it two stars is because I enjoyed the vision of how the writer described Afghanistan before it became what it is today, that was the only part of the book that peaked my interest.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2013

    If you had a chance to be good again would you take it? The kite

    If you had a chance to be good again would you take it? The kite runner is a short novel if you get to finish it, when you get an idea of what happed in a scenario it might be easier to put in to words that explain every moment and detail in space, that way you know what is going on in a scenario. I had never read a book with such curvature in the scenes that you imagine while reading.  For a book difficulty of reading I would say the grammar is varied. If you’re the type of person that gets in to reading and would like to get a sample of a hazzara boy that had a unreliable friend and Pashtuns treating him like a joke because of his home town he grew up in. his brother was the unreliable friend that destroyed a huge secret brotherhood, yes they were brothers that came from the same baba (father) but one brother dies not knowing and while the other still living in his midlife crisis finding out the truth of what is real and isn’t. well back to the one of many lesson learned in this book is that you always get a second chance to be good again, and that’s what the living brother is trying to peruse because his guilty conscious is trying to fix what has happened that made everything go wrong, tough luck is heavy when it rests on your shoulder, time grows bigger but weaker, a never ending cycle. He continuously asks for attention when clearly the attention should be his own given. if you live saying I am weak you will be weak. Try not to think about what is but what it isn’t. Fight for what is right, even if you’re afraid in the pits of danger.in the end it’s not what you have that counts it’s what you did to help. If you have read all this the text I have typed then you won’t have trouble putting yourself in The Kite Runner and you will learn the major knowledge that may assist in your life to come.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2013

    The ¿Kite Runner¿ is a great story that talks about the author

    The “Kite Runner” is a great story that talks about the author Khalid Hosseini the Sunni Muslim that was born in Kabul, Afghanistan in 1963, and then moved to the U.S to San Francisco, CA in 1980. His father “Baba” calls him “Amir”, and his mom died when she gave birth to him. Rahim Khan Baba’s friend tells Amir in the beginning of the story “there is a way to be good again” and this quote is the main idea of the story.
    The story is mainly about two friends, Amir the Sunnis Muslim and Hassan the Shi’a Muslim, but because they are from different religious, that culture will prohibit them from being friends, but they always were together. Assef the boy who is stick to his culture didn’t like that, so he wanted to hurt both of them, and when he had the chance with Hassan he took it, he rapped him so that Hassan will understand that he is a man who stands for his culture and Amir saw everything but didn’t do anything, so he betrayed his friend because of his weakness. After a long time period, Amir had to go back to his country to find out that Assef has his own half brother’s son Sohrab and that he had to fight Assef so he can get Sohrab back, but Amir like always is weak and get beaten up almost to death until Sohrab saved him. This showed Amir the what happened around him was mostley because of him and that’s why Rahim Khan told Amir that “there is a way to be good again” so that he recognizes what he did when he was young and the difference between the feelings of Hassan towards Amir when he saved him and Amir towards Hassan when he betrayed him. That’s why what goes around comes around.
    I liked this novel, because it shows us that no matter how far a person goes or how much money a person can make, it’s always going to be the time when life shows that person that what he/she did was wrong so that every time this person remembers what happen to him, will remember what he/she did. But even if life showed Amir that what he did was wrong and he had to pay because of how he treated his own childhood friend that turned to be his half brother, Amir will not change and will stay the same person that he was when he was a child, because a person who won’t stand for himself will not stand for anything else.
    I honestly recommend this novel to everyone, even if I didn’t like the main character Amir which is the author, but it’s still a great story that talks about our daily life with others and the responsibilities that we have to take towards the people we love.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 9, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    One of the saddest books I have read in quite a while. The autho

    One of the saddest books I have read in quite a while. The author does not pull any punches, or leave anything to the imagination. I liked that the author used italics for the afghani terms that some westerners may not be familiar with. This book was bought for me as a gift and I really enjoyed reading it

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 10, 2014

    Beautifully and sensitively written. Addresses the elemental a

    Beautifully and sensitively written. Addresses the elemental actions of most people - self-preservation or altruistic action. This book focuses on the failings and redemption of Amir. In the end Amir becomes a stronger person for his ability to deal with those weakness and rise above them due to his willingness to look at his guilt - not hide from them. The people in this novel are 'flesh and blood', I needed to see what happens to them next and when the book is finished it felt like I had lost a family member. It was not a book to sit and read at one setting as the violence made me have to put it down until I could come to terms with it before picking it up again. If you want a thought provoking book about the reality of the choices humans face and how they can be addressed this is for you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2014

    It really opened up my eyes to the difficulties in a seemingly w

    It really opened up my eyes to the difficulties in a seemingly whole other world. I never really knew just how complicated life could be when there's danger around every corner encouraging rash decisions. It showed me how greed, love, and life intertwine and wind their way into a person's life, molding a person into who they are. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2014

    THE KITE RUNNER By: Khaled Hosseini Book Review By: Ashlyn Lutz

    THE KITE RUNNER
    By: Khaled Hosseini
    Book Review By: Ashlyn Lutz
    371 Pages, 4.5/5 Stars
    The Novel Kite Runner’s story begins in Kabul, Afghanistan. The year is 1975; a young Amir is twelve years old. We are introduced to the other two main characters, Hassan and Baba, right from the beginning. Amir’s growth throughout the novel is from a selfish child to a selfless adult. Amir had a very privileged childhood, being in one of the richest families in Kabul. Hassan grew up as a servant to Baba and Amir, which teaches him his calling was to sacrifice himself for others. Hassan stays loyal, forgiving, and good natured from the start till his death. Baba is Amir’s father; he sets the moral bar in the novel. When Amir is a boy he worries he doesn’t have the courage to stand up for himself. We learn that Baba and Amir flee to America as refugees. The move to America is extremely hard for Baba because he is used to being wealthy and well-respected in his community. He is working a low paying job at a gas station which means him and Amir must live modestly. 
    The Story starts out with Amir and Hassan, who at this time has a hare-lip, and a group of older bullies led by Assef. Baba, for Hassan’s birthday, pays to fix his hare-lip. Throughout the story we see two sides of Baba, how he acts towards Amir and how he acts towards Hassan.  Amir wants Baba’s attention so he competes in a kite-fighting competition. Hassan has promised to run after the last defeated kite.  He finds the fallen kite but is chased by some other boys. Amir follows him and discovers Assef raping Hassan. Amir runs away hoping Hassan did not see him. For Amir’s 13th Birthday his father Baba threw him a party. Amir and Hassan see Assef for the first time since the rape. For a present, Assef gives Amir a biography of Hitler. Amir leaves the party to go to an abandoned lot where Rahim Khan talks to him and gives him a special gift, a notebook for Amir to write stories in. 
    Amir is struggling with the guilt of not standing up for Hassan and he wants them out of the house. Amir plants some money and a brand new watch in Hassan's bed so people think that Hassan has stolen from Amir.  He and Ali leave the house in Kabul.  Amir knows he is causing great pain to others, including his father, but he does not do anything to fix the lie. The year is 1981, Amir and his father have to leave everything and flee to Pakistan inside the tank of a fuel truck, with dozens of refugees. They go to Freemont, California. Throughout time Amir falls in love with an Afghan girl names Soraya. They get marries a month before Baba dies of lung Cancer.  Amir goes to Pakistan after getting a call from Baba's old friend Rahim Khan, who is sick and old, living in Pakistan.  Amir plans his trip to Pakistan and hopes that coming to Pakistan will give him a chance to redeem himself. Rahim Khan tells Amir that he is dying and tells him that Hassan lived with him in Kabul for a while. Amir learns that Hassan and his wife have been executed by the Taliban. Also, Hassan is not only Amir's former servant but also his half-brother, the offspring of Amir's father and Hassan's mother Sanaubar. Amir travels to Afghanistan to rescue Hassan's son Sohrab.  At the house, Amir meets Assef, his childhood enemy. Sohrab is being kept at the home where he is made to dance in women's clothes and Assef might have been raping him. Assef agrees to give him to Amir, but only if Amir will let him beat him up. Amir is saved when Sohrab uses his slingshot to shoot Assef's eye.  It is hard for Sohrab to interact with Amir and Soraya for a while back in America but the soon move past.
    The theme of The Kite Runner was the search for redemption. Amir’s quest to redeem himself with Baba was because he felt that Baba blamed him for the death of his mother. Amir’s mom died giving birth to him. To redeem himself to Baba, Amir thinks he must win the kite tournament and bring Baba the losing kite. The more extensive part of Amir’s search for redemption, however, stems from his guilt regarding Hassan. That guilt drives the climactic events of the story, including Amir’s journey to Kabul to find Sohrab and his confrontation with Assef. The moral standard Amir must meet to earn his redemption is set early in the book, when Baba says that a boy who doesn’t stand up for himself becomes a man who can’t stand up to anything. As a boy, Amir fails to stand up for himself. As an adult, he can only redeem himself by proving he has the courage to stand up for what is right.
    My opinion about the book is that I liked it because the story told was amazing. For example, when Amir’s dad Baba stands up and almost dies to protect the women who the soldier has picked to rape, it shows the courageous acts the men take. The book was not predictable because you never knew how a situation could go. Going back to the scene with Baba, he could’ve easily been shot, but the general came and stopped the soldier. The ending of the book really changes the way you look at your family and friends, and to appreciate having them more. A connection I made with the book was to the book Night by Elie Wiesel. When Amir and his father were traveling to America but had to secretly pass into Pakistan, it reminded me of when Elie and his father were on the train cramped in with a hundred other people going to the concentration camp. I would recommend this book to other students because it’s not a hard read, and the story line is amazing. A rating for this book would be four out of five stars. The Kite Runner had an intriguing plot throughout the whole story, just at the beginning goes a little bit slower than I would have liked.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2014

    If you like adventure and history then Kite Runner is for you. K

    If you like adventure and history then Kite Runner is for you. Khaled Hosseini uses the history of Afghanistan to craft his story about two boys in Kabul. I mainly liked the book because of the subplot and the rising tensions in Afghanistan. I would definitely recommend this book to any history lovers. The story of the son and his servant/best friend just draws you in with the power of their friendship. I’ve said a lot about the history, but once you get into the book you will never want to put it down.   

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2014

    If you like a book with suspense, courage, and adventure, you wi

    If you like a book with suspense, courage, and adventure, you will love the book The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. The book takes you on a journey, back to a land in Afghanistan that was easy to live in, but things soon change. The main character, Amir is forced to suffer in a changing country, and quickly learns that he needs to escape. The book then takes a turn into an exhilarating journey with many twists and turns. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a triumphant story that goes into detail about the hardships of the main character. The detail itself in the story kept me as a reader intrigued all the way through the book. At some points it was unbelievable what happened to Amir, but it only added to how remarkable his true story actually is.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2014

    so much love for this book

    so much love for this book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 15, 2014

    Amazing personal story. Didn't know much of Afghan culture befo

    Amazing personal story. Didn't know much of Afghan culture before reading this, but it was a great primer and deeply human as well.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    The Kite Runner is Khaled Hosseini's fist novel (10th anniversar

    The Kite Runner is Khaled Hosseini's fist novel (10th anniversary. It was written in 2003) depicting the reality of what happened in Afghanistan in the seventies.
    This is the portrait of the friendship between Amin, who comes from a well-off family, and his servant Hassan.

    The social class and religion differences were, in a way, the reasons why Amir betrays his best friend.

    To worsen matters, the war me in the way, so Amir and his father flee the country to settle in California, to start a life as refugees
    with the resulting loss of their privileges.

    Many years later, Amin is compelled to come back to Afghanistan and this time he redeems himself by doing what's right.
    At times the story can be exhausting given the succession of misery and turmoil, which doesn't seem to end.
    One thing is sure, this novel will make an ever-lasting impression on you as it did on me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2013

    This book is very well written and tells of a story of redemptio

    This book is very well written and tells of a story of redemption, loyalty, and guilt. Although the ending is not what is expected, I found myself unable to put the book down. The story is creative and the theme is meaningful. Overall, this story full of realism and honesty, will most likely give inspiration to those who read it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2013

    A definite page turner! Loved all of the irony and symbolism thr

    A definite page turner! Loved all of the irony and symbolism throughout the novel. I was just slightly disappointed in the ending... didn't seem conclusive enough for such a vivid and detailed story...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 29, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    5 Stars

    Loved every part of this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 12, 2013

    This is an excellent read. I couldn't put the book down. I love

    This is an excellent read. I couldn't put the book down. I love the writing style of this author and have read everything he has written so far. This would be a good book for a book club discussion.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 2, 2013

    dark and powerful, something i didn't expect from this. if i was

    dark and powerful, something i didn't expect from this. if i was to recommend a book it would be this one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)