The Knights Templar in the New World: How Henry Sinclair Brought the Grail to Acadia

Overview

Uses the principles of sacred geometry, archaeological evidence, and Native American legend to discover the site of a secret Templar settlement in Nova Scotia

• Offers evidence that Scottish prince Henry Sinclair not only sailed to the New World 100 years before Columbus, but that he also established a refuge there for the Templars fleeing persecution

• Shows that the Grail, the holy bloodline connecting the House of David to the Merovingian dynasty through Jesus and Mary ...

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The Knights Templar in the New World: How Henry Sinclair Brought the Grail to Acadia

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Overview

Uses the principles of sacred geometry, archaeological evidence, and Native American legend to discover the site of a secret Templar settlement in Nova Scotia

• Offers evidence that Scottish prince Henry Sinclair not only sailed to the New World 100 years before Columbus, but that he also established a refuge there for the Templars fleeing persecution

• Shows that the Grail, the holy bloodline connecting the House of David to the Merovingian dynasty through Jesus and Mary Magdalene, was hidden in the New World

In 1398, almost 100 years before Columbus arrived in the New World, the Scottish prince Henry Sinclair, Earl of Orkney, sailed to what is today Nova Scotia, where his presence was recorded by Micmac Indian legends about Glooskap. This was the same Prince Henry Sinclair who offered refuge to the Knights Templar fleeing the persecution unleashed against the order by French king Philip the Fair at the beginning of the 14th century. With evidence from archaeological sites, indigenous legend, and sacred geometry handed down by the Templar order to the Freemasons, author William F. Mann has now rediscovered the site of the settlement established by Sinclair and his Templar followers in the New World. Here they found a safe refuge for the Grail—the holy bloodline connecting the House of David to the Merovingian Dynasty through the descendants of Jesus and Mary Magdalene—until the British exiled all the Acadians in 1755.

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Editorial Reviews

Andrew Sinclair
“A work of insight and discovery of interest to all Masons and seekers of treasures and secrets.”
Michael Bradley
“Utterly fascinating reading. Anyone who loves subtle detective stories will be enthralled by Bill Mann’s research.”
Henry Berry
"A mind-expanding investigation involving many disregarded, fascinating historical facts and connections."
Mark Williams
". . . you'll find much to ponder in this very detailed exploration. . . . this is an engaging study—one that definitely belongs on the reading list."
Janet Brennan
". . . so many fascinating subjects are woven into this book that it could serve as a study guide of esoteric topics."
Michelle Hilton
"I recommend it especially to those who have an interest in the Knights Templar."
Steven Sora
“Bill Mann blends Pythagorean geometry, hermetic wisdom, and secrets of Freemasonry to reveal a blueprint to the final resting place of the Holy Grail. From the Tarot to Tolkien, from Medieval France to modern day Nova Scotia, the reader is initiated into mysteries often hidden in plain sight.”
author of The Sword and the Grail Andrew Sinclair
“A work of insight and discovery of interest to all Masons and seekers of treasures and secrets.”
author of The Lost Treasure of the Knights Templar Steven Sora
“Bill Mann blends Pythagorean geometry, hermetic wisdom, and secrets of Freemasonry to reveal a blueprint to the final resting place of the Holy Grail. From the Tarot to Tolkien, from Medieval France to modern day Nova Scotia, the reader is initiated into mysteries often hidden in plain sight.”
author of Holy Grail Across the Atlantic Michael Bradley
“Utterly fascinating reading. Anyone who loves subtle detective stories will be enthralled by Bill Mann’s research.”
From the Publisher
“Utterly fascinating reading. Anyone who loves subtle detective stories will be enthralled by Bill Mann’s research.”

". . . you'll find much to ponder in this very detailed exploration. . . . this is an engaging study—one that definitely belongs on the reading list."

“A work of insight and discovery of interest to all Masons and seekers of treasures and secrets.”

“Bill Mann blends Pythagorean geometry, hermetic wisdom, and secrets of Freemasonry to reveal a blueprint to the final resting place of the Holy Grail. From the Tarot to Tolkien, from Medieval France to modern day Nova Scotia, the reader is initiated into mysteries often hidden in plain sight.”

". . . so many fascinating subjects are woven into this book that it could serve as a study guide of esoteric topics."

"A mind-expanding investigation involving many disregarded, fascinating historical facts and connections."

"I recommend it especially to those who have an interest in the Knights Templar."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780892811854
  • Publisher: Inner Traditions/Bear & Company
  • Publication date: 3/5/2004
  • Edition description: 2nd Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 955,344
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

William F. Mann’s late great-uncle was a Supreme Grand Master of the Knights Templar of Canada and it was from him that the author received the key that would eventually unlock this mystery. He lives in Oakville, Ontario.

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Read an Excerpt

A Fool’s Quest

There is a faint whisper among traditional historians that North America, the New World, was regularly visited not only by the Vikings and Irish, but by pre-Christian mariners such as the Egyptians, Greeks, Phoenicians, Carthaginians and the Celts. Hints of these visits now appear to be revealing themselves through a variety of sources including classical mythology, Indian legend, and maritime folklore.

If true, one would expect a wealth of solid evidence to have been found suggesting, at the very least, temporary settlement, specifically along the eastern seaboard of North America. But hard physical evidence has yet to be found in any great detail. Could it be that those who came before Columbus and Champlain, men like the enlightened fourteenth century Prince Henry Sinclair, were agents of the secret Order of the Knights of the Temple of Solomon and other earlier secret societies? And could it be that these same Knights Templar, whose secrets and mysteries provided the basis of Freemasonry in Scotland, purposely covered their tracks throughout the New World?

This “New World secret" may have been part of a more ancient mystery that involved the Royal Merovingian Bloodline of France, the suggested “Grail Family” of Jesus Christ, and the Royal House of David and King Solomon. These unanswered questions have followed me for many years and as I searched for the answers, I began to unravel the thick tapestry of intrigue that hides the keys to these and many other secrets of the Knights Templar in Nova Scotia.

My story begins with my own bloodline and its peculiar interests. The Mann family is steeped in military and Masonic history. From my earliest times, I can remember my great uncles and father confusing me with little stories of intrigue and honor, both on the battlefield and amongst the shadows. They constantly enthralled me with unusual puzzles and games. It was as though I was being challenged, yet for what purpose I didn’t know. Unfortunately, every time it appeared that I was starting to understand the symbolism behind their stories, the philosophy of love and harmony that was being exuded to me, someone would die before I could ask the right questions. I soon learned that to discover the answers to these secrets I would have to follow my own course.

My great-uncle was a gentle and understanding man. He explained to me that everyone possesses the ability for good and evil. In this way, all individuals have to search for their own balance of human nature, a balance between good and evil. I never questioned why he always talked in a moral, philosophical manner. I was exposed so much to the spiritual level of thinking that I considered it to be second nature. What my great-uncle did to raise my spirit when I was bedridden for a month at the age of thirteen was to ask me if I wanted to know a secret, a secret that no one knew except him. What he described, and ultimately showed me, was his Masonic ring, a ring that to a thirteen-year-old appeared magical and secretive. Frederic George Mann was showing me a ring of the Supreme Grand Master of the Knights Templar of Canada. I discovered this fact during the sorting of my mother’s personal things following her death. I now know that it was my great-uncle’s instilling in me of the notion of good and evil and the balance of nature that started me on my quest—a quest that ended at a secret Templar refuge in Nova Scotia.

What intrigued me and set me on a mosaic of fascinating geometric patterns was a map within the book Holy Grail Across the Atlantic, by Michael Bradley. This book illustrated what was thought to be Prince Henry Sinclair’s travels and exploration throughout Nova Scotia. Somehow, I traveled back to the ring of my great-uncle. The ring had a secret compartment. The setting was the standard Masonic emblem of a set-square and compass; but when manipulated and opened on hinges, underneath, set on a pale blue jeweled background was the intertwining of two golden rings centered on a gold bar with a round purple stone (amethyst) setting in the middle.

Don’t ask me how I made the mental connection but what was truly startling was that I could apply this configuration to the mainland portion of a map of Nova Scotia with the center of the jewel falling precisely on its center at a place called Mt. Uniacke. In my mind I turned over the name Uniacke, “one axis.” Was it possible that this symbol related specifically to Nova Scotia?

I was hooked! I rushed to the local library and gathered as much reading material as I could. The primary trail was through the many references to the Freemasons. However, I was unaware of my great-uncle’s position within the Freemasons/Knights Templar at that time. I was like a blind man in a train station, not knowing which way to turn. Still, a nagging feeling made me suspect that someone was guiding my hand. It was as though my great-uncle had planted a seed and that I had to feed and nourish and tend to the plant and follow its growth.

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Table of Contents


Foreword by Michael Bradley
Foreword by Reverend Lionel Fanthorpe
Acknowledgments
Introduction

1 A Fool’s Quest
2 A Balance of Nature
3 The Legend of Glooscap
4 Mary, Mary Quite Contrary
5 Peace 681
6 The Temptation of Saint Anthony
7 The Keys
8 La Val d’Or
9 The Fortress of Glass
10 Out of the Shadows
11 Into the Light
12 On A Golden Wing
13 A Fool’s Discovery

Notes
Bibliography
About the Author
Index

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2006

    childish rubbish, no proper research, a joke

    this is the most childish fantasy rubbish i have ever been unfortunate to read. If you are really interested in this story, please read the proper authors on the subject, ie those that have actually done all the research themselves, not just spent several chapters quoting others work (which he admits freely) which appears to be the vogue right now from north american continent authors (see dan brown who quotes the same authors). This book constantly & glibly presents theories as fact, which is just plain wrong and misleading. Since when was henry sinclair promoted to royalty? not in any historical research or royal family trees i have ever seen - In this authors imagination only it would seem. As to Arcadia being in nova scotia, well its still under the queen & part of the commomwealth, but even so, this is unsupported rubbish & total wishful thinking. The north american continent needs to get its own history and stop stealing ours (british). This book is so offensive on so many levels and as someone who is used to reading properly researched and written book from the authors this person quotes so much, i can only recommend ignoring this work as its written in such a childish and patronising fashion its just plain insulting. Only of interest to those who live in the north american continent who want to make believe a history stolen from the british isles. Newsflash, britain was the only country that did NOT actively persecute the templars and another newsflash - scotland is part of great britain. You are scottish, you have a british passport, you are scottish, you have the queen as your head of state, you are scottish and join the armed forces, you join the british forces, you are born in scotland, you are a BRITISH CITIZEN. get real. i only gave it 1 star because there is not a minus rating. this book is an insult to anyone with an IQ over 50.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2005

    Time to Tell Some Truths

    As an Acadien descendant of its earliest pioneers and many of their Mi'kmaq spouses, I was taught from childhood that we were a people of destiny, that our expulsion/attempted genocide in 1755 by the British really had nothing to do with our refusal to bear arms. It is very validating to see some real light shed on Acadie and the truth about its founding and political/geographical demise. But Acadie lives on in the hearts and minds of its sons and daughters. I have always believed that Acadie will one day rise out the ashes like the phoenix when the time is right. Somebody owes us a real homeland.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2006

    Some research or logic would be nice here

    I bought this book after reading another book on a related topic that has nothing to do with the Templars (The Island of Seven Cities by Paul Chiasson, I highly recommend it). This book uses a lot of the same facts as the basis for its premise (Pre-Columbian maps of North America, the legend of Kluscap, the Mi'qmak peoples seemingly unexplainable knowledge), but comes to a completely different conclusion. I was interested in comparing the two to see how each author reached his conclusions. However, the author uses a sort of perverse inductive logic by arriving at his conclusions and then inventing links between the 'facts' (some actual, some imagined) and his conclusions. He uses a lot of flawed logic such as 'This word is an anagram for that one if you just replace these four letters with three other ones', or by explaining that you have to measure the width of Nova Scotia along latitudinal lines, not along its actual orientation, but then failing to measure the length along longitudinal lines, and instead using its true length to fit his point. I also find it amusing that the author criticizes the works of previous authors on the subject, while at the same time, using them as the basis for his work (as a previous reviewer pointed out). I was expecting some reaching in the book, but I was disappointed in the obvious logical holes (large enough to drive a truck through) in his arguments. The book was enjoyable in an amusing detective-thriller kind of way though.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2009

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