The Knitter's Book of Yarn: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing, Using, and Enjoying Yarn

The Knitter's Book of Yarn: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing, Using, and Enjoying Yarn

3.9 20
by Clara Parkes
     
 

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Not all yarns are alike. Some make our hearts and hands sing, some get the job done without much fanfare, and some cause nothing but frustration and disappointment. The gorgeous pair of socks that emerged from their first bath twice as long as when they went in. The delicate baby sweater that started pilling before it even came off the needles. The stunning

Overview

Not all yarns are alike. Some make our hearts and hands sing, some get the job done without much fanfare, and some cause nothing but frustration and disappointment. The gorgeous pair of socks that emerged from their first bath twice as long as when they went in. The delicate baby sweater that started pilling before it even came off the needles. The stunning colorwork scarf that you can’t wear because the yarn feels like sandpaper against your neck. If only there were a way to read a skein and know how it would behave and what it wanted to become before you invested your time, energy, and money in it. Now there is! With The Knitter’s Book of Yarn, you’ll learn how to unleash your inner yarn whisperer.

In these pages, Clara Parkes provides in-depth insight into a vast selection of yarns, giving you the inside stories behind the most common fiber types, preparations, spins, and ply combinations used by large-scale manufacturers and importers, medium-sized companies, boutique dye shops, community spinneries, and old-fashioned sheep farms. And, because we learn best by doing, Parkes went to some of the most creative and inquisitive design minds of the knitting world to provide a wide assortment of patterns created to highlight the qualities (and minimize the drawbacks) of specific types of yarns.

The Knitter’s Book of Yarn will teach you everything you need to know about yarn: How it’s made, who makes it, how it gets to you, and what it longs to become. The next time you pick up a skein, you won’t have to wonder what to do with it. You’ll just know–the way any yarn whisperer would.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Un. Real. There is no other way to describe...well, that’s a lie because I'll come up with more. But my first impression of The Knitter's Book of Yarn? Un. Real. I open the hardcover to reveal a fiber family tree. Smitten. Smitten on the spot. This book is, without a doubt, everything you ever wanted to know not just about fiber but were afraid to ask….This is absolutely a MUST HAVE book, and I don't say that often.”
—MelissaKnits, blog
Library Journal

Many longtime knitters are not all that knowledgeable about the yarns they use in their craft and would be hard-pressed to distinguish a cellulose from a synthetic yarn, let alone expound on fiber characteristics. Parkes, publisher of the wildly popular KnittersReview.com weekly, has made it her mission to explore the potential uses and quirks of yarns, from simple two-ply yarn to chenille and bouclés. She has visited large manufacturers, importers, small dye shops, and sheep farms and learned how fibers are prepared, spun, and plied and what types of projects might best bring out the assets of a particular yarn. She tells all in this readable book that also includes a variety of projects suitable for each type of yarn. This marvelous resource belongs in every knitting collection.


—Jan Zlendich

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307352163
Publisher:
Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony
Publication date:
10/16/2007
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
178,453
Product dimensions:
7.77(w) x 9.29(h) x 1.11(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

CLARA PARKES left her career in the booming high-tech industry to pursue her love of knitting. She lives on the coast of Maine in a farm house full of yarn. She is the publisher of KnittersReview.com and a contributing editor to Interweave Knits.

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The Knitter's Book of Yarn: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing, Using, and Enjoying Yarn 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I didnt know I would be able to know so much about yarn just after 30 minutes with this book! DId you know that angora and cashmire is 8 times warmer then wool from a sheep :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a knitter, I am fascinated by everything related to the craft. This is a great book that teaches you everything you could possibly want to know about yarn. Definitely worth the read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this book full of information to help me understand the nature of fiber better. It has greatly improved my craft. Also, I find I go back to the Maine Morning Mitts pattern again and again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the number one book i recommend to new knitters. Well written and extremely informative.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is really useful for knitters who enjoy working with vintage patterns or otherwise enjoy swapping out yarns from patterns, or who design their own knitting patterns. I particularly found the sections on how to work with a fiber's natural tendencies the most useful. If you have a large yarn stash that you're trying to use in other patterns this book will help you choose fibers that work with what you have. I really am not a knitter who enjoys wearing or knitting socks so if you do, a lot of the information in this book is extremely helpful for you. I also didn't particularly like any of the patterns that are in the book (many of them are sock patterns to boot). However, as they are incidental bonuses to the main information, it doesn't particularly bother me either way, as the other information is detailed enough that I still feel my purchase was worth the investment. One major drawback to this book is that it does not cater to crocheters at all. While the general yarn information still holds, keep in mind that crochet tends to be a heavier-weight fabric and it therefore is a good idea to remember that drape, stretching, and shrinking issues may be affected differently by crochet stitches.
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JuliaMVD More than 1 year ago
This is a lovely book and delivers what the title promises: knowledge of yarn for knitters. I truly enjoyed learning so much about each type of yarn and the knowledgeable comments on how each yarn behaves and which kind of projects are where they're shown in their best light. I'm not giving it 5 stars because I haven't had any luck with the projects I tackled. I'm a new knitter and still have lots to figure out, but the two-ply cardigan for children, which starts with "It doesn't get any easier than this sweet little cardi"... well, the mixing of measurements in stitches, rows and centimeters didn't turn out well. I made the sleeves about four times and they never got really well, in the final version they're really a size bigger than the body! Part of the problem, I think, lays in that there isn't an explanation on how to do the increases and the buttonholes were impossible to figure out (I gave up at the 4th attempt and I stitched invisible pressure buttons and the "real" buttons where the buttonholes were supposed to be). Also, the garment pictured has a finish around all edges that is not included in the instructions. That's not fair. However this misfortune (I'm sorrier about the fact that I don't feel I have learned much about how to knit a cardigan, only what not to do), I think it's a great book and it's a treasure in my reference library. I enjoy just opening it and reading it, and I've given it as a present for new knitters. Even if the projects are a bit unfriendly.