The Knoxville Campaign: Burnside and Longstreet in East Tennessee

( 1 )

Overview

“Hess’s account of the understudied Knoxville Campaign sheds new light on the generalship of James Longstreet and Ambrose Burnside, as well as such lesser players as Micah Jenkins and Orlando Poe. Both scholars and general readers should welcome it. The scholarship is sound, the research, superb, the writing, excellent.” —Steven E. Woodworth, author of Decision in the Heartland: The Civil War in the West

In the fall and winter of 1863, Union General Ambrose Burnside and Confederate General James Longstreet vied ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (1) from $78.80   
  • Used (1) from $78.80   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$78.80
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(7737)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Like New
10-15-12 Hardcover FINE Crisp, clean, unread hardcover with light shelfwear to the dust jacket and a publisher's mark to one edge-Nice! 1.64 lbs.

Ships from: Harrisburg, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

“Hess’s account of the understudied Knoxville Campaign sheds new light on the generalship of James Longstreet and Ambrose Burnside, as well as such lesser players as Micah Jenkins and Orlando Poe. Both scholars and general readers should welcome it. The scholarship is sound, the research, superb, the writing, excellent.” —Steven E. Woodworth, author of Decision in the Heartland: The Civil War in the West

In the fall and winter of 1863, Union General Ambrose Burnside and Confederate General James Longstreet vied for control of the city of Knoxville and with it the railroad that linked the Confederacy east and west. The generals and their men competed, too, for the hearts and minds of the people of East Tennessee. Often overshadowed by the fighting at Chickamauga and Chattanooga, this important campaign has never received a full scholarly treatment. In this landmark book, award-winning historian Earl J. Hess fills a gap in Civil War scholarship—a timely contribution that coincides with and commemorates the sesquicentennial of the Civil War
     The East Tennessee campaign was an important part of the war in the West. It brought the conflict to Knoxville in a devastating way, forcing the Union defenders to endure two weeks of siege in worsening winter conditions. The besieging Confederates suffered equally from supply shortages, while the civilian population was caught in the middle and the town itself suffered widespread destruction. The campaign culminated in the famed attack on Fort Sanders early on the morning of November 29, 1863. The bloody repulse of Longstreet’s veterans that morning contributed significantly to the unraveling of Confederate hopes in the Western theater of operations.
     Hess’s compelling account is filled with numerous maps and images that enhance the reader’s understanding of this vital campaign that tested the heart of East Tennessee. The author’s narrative and analysis will appeal to a broad audience, including general readers, seasoned scholars, and new students of Tennessee and Civil War history. The Knoxville Campaign will thoroughly reorient our view of the war as it played out in the mountains and valleys of East Tennessee.

EARL J. HESS is Stewart W. McClelland Distinguished Professor in Humanities and an associate professor of history at Lincoln Memorial University. He is the author of nearly twenty books, including The Civil War in the West—Victory and Defeat from the Appalachians to the Mississippi and Lincoln Memorial University and the Shaping of Appalachia.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Hess’s account of the understudied Knoxville Campaign sheds new light on the generalship of James Longstreet and Ambrose Burnside, as well as such lesser players as Micah Jenkins and Orlando Poe. Both scholars and general readers should welcome it. The scholarship is sound, the research, superb, the writing, excellent.” —Steven E. Woodworth, author of Decision in the Heartland: The Civil War in the West
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781572339163
  • Publisher: University of Tennessee Press
  • Publication date: 10/15/2012
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 440
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

EARL J. HESS is Stewart W. McClelland Distinguished Professor in Humanities and an associate professor of history at Lincoln Memorial University. He is the author of nearly twenty books, including The Civil War in the West—Victory and Defeat from the Appalachians to the Mississippi and Lincoln Memorial University and the Shaping of Appalachia.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface xi

Acknowledgments xv

1 Burnside in East Tennessee 1

2 Turnaround 19

3 Lenoir's Station 37

4 Campbell's Station 53

5 Sanders Buys Time 77

6 Siege 95

7 Search for a Solution 125

8 Fort Sanders 151

9 Relief 175

10 Break Away 191

11 Bean's Station 207

12 Lonsstreet in East Tennessee 221

Conclusion 245

Orders of Battle 249

Appendix A The Forts of Knoxville 265

Appendix B Knoxville's Civil War Legacy 269

Notes 295

Bibliography 373

Index 413

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 30, 2013

    Earl J. Hess has written a deeply researched, profusely illustra

    Earl J. Hess has written a deeply researched, profusely illustrated and mapped account of the struggle between James G. Longstreet and his Army of Northern Virginia's First Corps(detached to the west in late 1863) and Ambrose E. Burnside's Union Ninth Corps for control of the East Tennessee community of Knoxville. East Tennessee Unionism was a siren song to Washington authorities that Lincoln and his War Department leaders had endeavored to persuade army leaders in the middle departments to heed, unsuccessfully, since the beginning of the war. Burnside was the first to attempt lifting Confederate domination of the region, which he skillfully accomplished with superior numbers. Burnside quickly found, however, that his reluctant predecessors had been correct; keeping an army supplied without rail lines & with undependable water transportation placed impossible logistical demands on the troops, as they also did on Longstreet's army after his arrival. Longstreet tried to surprise elements of  Burnside's army outside Knoxville, but failed due to Burnside's adroit maneuvering of his detachments, withdrawing into the Knoxville fortifications (designed by his chief engineer, Orlando M. Poe) without serious losses. Longstreet dithered for almost a week, before settling into a semi-siege (he simply lacked the manpower to cut the city off from all outside connection, which allowed Burnside to receive limited local food and forage from Loyalists outside the lines.) Longstreet then ordered a frontal attack on a key position, Fort Sanders, which was a costly failure, either because inadequate scouting did not uncover the depth of a ditch at the base of the fort, or because the attack's commander, Lafayette McLaws, failed to provide adequate scaling ladders. Believing the latter, and unwilling to accept responsibility for the former, Longstreet preferred court-martial charges against McLaws; McLaws was subsequently found not guilty of all the charges.The failure of the Fort Sanders assault & the concurrent confirmation of Braxton Bragg's overwhelming defeat at Chattanooga, gave Longstreet two choices: either turn immediately and move south to sustain Bragg or retreat into western Virginia, go into winter quarters with a view to returning to Lee's Army of Northern Virginia for the spring, 1864, campaign. Longstreet chose the latter course, thus effectively giving up Confederate control of East Tennessee.
    Despite the cover blurb's that the Knoxville campaign has been "understudied," Hess' work invites comparison with Alexander Mendoza's 2008 "Confederate Struggle for Command: General James Longstreet and the First Corps in the West." The two books do not simply cover the same ground. however. Mendoza's work covers the entire sojourn of Longstreet and his men in the West, so much attention is focused on Longstreet's role in the Union defeat at Chickamauga; the first half of his book is devoted to that battle. Mendoza's focus is on the Confederates, while Hess focuses on the Knoxville campaign & gives equal time to, and evaluation of, both commanders. Hess devotes an entire chapter to Longstreet's attack and repulse at Fort Sanders, Mendoza, little more than a page. Yet on a number of things the two authors are agreed: Bragg's detachment of Longstreet to Knoxville when Grant was increasing his forces was clearly a disaster, caused more by personal friction than by any strategic vision. Both authors find Longstreet abysmal as an independent commander; apparently "Lee's war horse"  needed his rider to be successful. 
    Hess's study is a fine campaign study, giving due attention to some of the minor characters that are missing or only touched on fleetingly in other accounts. Burnside's rehabilitation as an army commander, following the disaster of Fredericksburg in 1862, was strongly enhanced by his performance in a largely defensive role at Knoxville. Hess' work, like Mendoza's, is a welcome addition to the literature of the Civil War in the West, and well worth the cost for both buffs and serious scholars alike.
       

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)