The Ladies' Paradise (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) [NOOK Book]

Overview


The Ladies' Paradise catapults the reader into the present-day world of consumer culture and marketing. It seems as if the store owners of today's Bloomingdale's, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Neiman Marcus all read The Ladies' Paradise and made it their bible for creating desire for consumer goods. Emile Zola documents how the first department stores in nineteenth-century Paris made shopping into a religion, while he simultaneously woos readers with his gripping love story between the enterprising store owner Octave ...
See more details below
The Ladies' Paradise (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$3.49
BN.com price
(Save 12%)$3.99 List Price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview


The Ladies' Paradise catapults the reader into the present-day world of consumer culture and marketing. It seems as if the store owners of today's Bloomingdale's, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Neiman Marcus all read The Ladies' Paradise and made it their bible for creating desire for consumer goods. Emile Zola documents how the first department stores in nineteenth-century Paris made shopping into a religion, while he simultaneously woos readers with his gripping love story between the enterprising store owner Octave Mouret and the rags-to-riches heroine Denise Baudu.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author


Emile Zola, born in Paris in 1840, was raised in Aix en Provence in conditions of extreme poverty following the death of his father in 1847. In 1865, he decided to support himself by writing alone. The Ladies' Paradise is the eleventh novel in a series of twenty novels under the generic title The Rougon-Macquarts: the Natural and Social History of a Family Under the Second Empire. In this series, published between 1871 and 1893, Zola scientifically documents the effects of heredity and environment on the Rougon-Marquart family.
Read More Show Less

Introduction

Emile Zola's The Ladies' Paradise, published serially in 1882, catapults the reader into the present-day world of consumer culture and marketing. The novel is so prescient about marketing fantasy that it seems as if the store owners of today's Bloomingdale's, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Neiman Marcus all read The Ladies' Paradise and made it their bible for creating desire for consumer goods. Not only does Zola create a fascinating document about the rise of consumer culture but he also woos readers with his gripping love story between the enterprising store owner Octave Mouret and the rags-to-riches heroine Denise Baudu. The Ladies' Paradise celebrates the modern city and all of its bustling life in the latter part of the nineteenth century in Paris. The department store embodies the activity of modern life-the crowd, the spectacle, and of course, consumer culture. Zola documents how the first department stores made shopping into a religion in order to entice shoppers. The spectacle once associated with the church and its iconography of adored figures, such as statues of saints and the Virgin Mary, is replaced with the apparatus of luxury goods to be desired and coveted. In nineteenth-century society, the department store and consumer culture supplanted the church as the place where women could go to adore and be adored. The paradise for women is no longer associated with an afterworld but with the here and now and the teeming delights of shopping.

Emile Zola, born in Paris in 1840, was raised in Aix en Provence in conditions of extreme poverty following the death of his father in 1847. He attended the Collège Bourbon in Aix, followed by the Lycée Saint-Louis in Paris. He failed the baccalauréat in 1859 and subsequently held a series of poorly paid clerical jobs. In 1865, he decided to support himself by writing alone. The Ladies' Paradise is the eleventh novel in a series of twenty novels under the generic title The Rougon-Macquarts: the Natural and Social History of a Family Under the Second Empire. In this series, published between 1871 and 1893, Zola scientifically documents the effects of heredity and environment on the Rougon-Marquart family.

Zola, incorporating the positivist, scientific, and encyclopedic spirit of his age into his novels, was the originator and principal advocate of a new form of prose fiction called naturalism. Naturalism arose out of post-Darwinian biology in the mid-nineteenth century and proposed that man is determined by two kinds of natural forces: heredity and environment. Practitioners of this literary movement refused to idealize experience and believed that human life is strictly determined by natural laws. Naturalist writers depicted the mundane life of the lower classes, imbuing the novel with social history. In breaking with realism, naturalist writers privileged truth, however brutal and unpleasant it might be. Zola had a profound and lasting influence on the novel; one can chart the progression of naturalism and its variations through writers as diverse as Thomas Hardy, Sinclair Lewis, and Stephen Crane.

While the other novels in Zola's Rougon-Macquart series focus on documenting social history and depicting a prevailing pessimism, The Ladies' Paradise represents a break from the other novels in the series, as Zola explains: "I want in The Ladies' Paradise to write the poem of modern life. Thus, a complete change in philosophy: no more pessimism, first of all. Don't conclude with the stupidity and melancholy of life. On the contrary, conclude with its continual labour, the power and gaiety that comes from its productivity. In a word, go along with the century, which is a century of action, of conquest, of effort in every direction." In The Ladies' Paradise Zola creates a poem of city life-he paints the city as a place of life, activity, and commerce. The novel was a commercial success-so much so that it was the first of Zola's novels to be published in English.

In 1851, Britain held the Great Exhibition of the Crystal Palace, a gigantic building of iron and glass, showcasing on a global level the most recent technological developments of the age. The department store in Zola's novel, modeled after the Bon Marché (1852) and the Louvre (1855), is comparable to a gigantic commercial machine. Like the emerging cinema in the latter part of the century, the department store displays a moving parade of goods to be admired and coveted. Immediately on the first page of the novel, Zola links the department store to the railway and the city. Denise Baudu, the heroine of the tale, has just arrived in Paris from the country by railway, and she is "frightened and lost in this vast Paris," when all of a sudden she is "astonished" by the sight of The Ladies' Paradise. The store possesses the capacity to render people awestruck-the fantastical spectacle of the store capitalizes on desires evoked by looking into its windows and at the fantastical displays. Looking then takes on great meaning; it entails not simply the response everyone has uttered, "I'm just looking," when asked by a salesperson if he or she can help you. The look in this novel represents desire and ultimately love for consumer goods. It is no accident then that the love plot is secondary to the desire created by the department store.

The railroad in the nineteenth century helped to create the poem of modern life in the sense that it altered notions of time and space. The railroad, staged phantasmagorias, and early cinema all captured the fleeting quality of modern life-the cityscape became a moving parade of images. Along with the railroad, the textile industry grew enormously in the nineteenth century in France, and the railroad was able to transport quickly the textiles so lovingly described in The Ladies' Paradise. In order to accommodate the increasingly rapid circulation of goods and their consumers, Baron Haussman in the 1850s created a massive plan for the urban redevelopment of Paris that in effect modernized the city. He transformed the look of Paris by creating wide avenues and boulevards and sidewalks where people could walk and thereby look at one another. The emphasis on looking was further enhanced by advances in artificial lighting and the increase in window size. All of these developments focused on looking-but a new kind of looking, one that was fleeting, thereby increasing one's sense of desire. The French phrase for window-shopping is lèche-vitrines, which translated literally means "licking windows." This fleeting desire is paramount because it can never be fulfilled: it creates desire for more images. The narrator describes one of the store's window displays: "It was like a debauch of colour, a street pleasure, which burst forth there, a wealth of goods publicly displayed, where everybody could feast their eyes." Looking in the department store becomes associated with infantile and sexual gratification-one literally cannot stop looking because it feels so good.

The department store is the microcosm for the activity of modern life in the city; it stages the erotic of the city. The department store wants first and foremost to be adored. Everywhere in the novel objects are eroticized, and these objects are associated with the bodies of women. During one of the sales that structure the novel, Zola relates: "A fine dust rose from the floor, laden with the odour of woman, the odour of her linen and her bust, of her skirts, and her hair, an invading, penetrating odour, which seemed to be the incense of this temple raised for the worship of her body." At the same time that Zola creates a temple for the worship of women's bodies, he also portrays a machine that traffics in the exploitation of women's bodies. It is no accident that the store is founded on the body of the original woman owner, Madame Hédouin, who died from a fall while visiting the construction of the store. The narrator observes, "there's some of her blood in the foundation of that house." The dynamics of consumer culture are thus: woman must be seduced and once she yields she is scorned for giving in. That this language is sexual serves to create a double meaning for woman: on the one hand, she is adored; on the other, she becomes a victim of the vast machine of capitalism.

The duality of the image of woman pervades the novel. One could argue that the department store traffics in women's desires-their bodies actually become the site for exploitation and penetration. The novel is full of images of women's bodies being bloodied, such as when the narrator remarks: "And if woman reigned in their shops like a queen, cajoled, flattered, overwhelmed with attentions, she was an amorous one, on whom her subjects traffic, and who pays with a drop of her blood each fresh caprice…." However, the growth of the city and the department store actually had a liberating effect on women in that they were now free to shop on their own. They could walk the streets of the city and the department stores liberating them from the confines of the home. The cityscape then possessed the potentiality of creating unruly women in that they now could move freely in public space.

This duality produces a gothic effect. The novel creates two cities in one: the modern, teeming world of the department store and the bygone world of the small shop owners represented in all the images of decay Zola employs to describe the small shop owners' stores. This duality engenders two potentialities for women-one of liberation and one of confinement. In gothic novels the plot usually revolves around a castle or a house in which women are imprisoned. While Zola depicts the store in life-affirming images, still there is an underworld to this modern world that troubles the novel like a ghost. This underworld is displaced onto the body of Geneviève Baudu, the daughter of one of the small shop owners. She is described thus: "And there she lay, so very thin, under the bed-clothes, that one hardly suspected the form and existence of a human body. Her skinny arms, consumed by a burning fever, were in a perpetual movement of anxious, unconscious searching; whilst her black hair seemed thicker still, and to be eating up her poor face with its voracious vitality, that face in which was agonising the final degenerateness of a family sprung up in the shade, in this cellar of old commercial Paris." On her body is written the deleterious effects of consumer consumption.

But this is not the entire story. Zola uses the objects in the department store to create desires in women and those objects are closely aligned with the female body. Descriptions run riot, particularly when Zola depicts the three sales that provide the framework for all the action. Octave Mouret, the owner of The Ladies' Paradise, mounts fantastical store and window displays to fascinate and seduce women; similarly, Zola uses description to display women. But the fantastical parade of descriptions of the merchandise and its personification into women's bodies suggests that no matter how much consumer culture may render women into victims, they also cannot be captured. Here is a typical example of Zola's use of description of store goods and how they become associated with women's bodies:

The silk department was like a great chamber of love, hung with white by the caprice of some snowy maiden wishing to show off her spotless whiteness. All the milky tones of an adored person were there, from the velvet of the hips, to the fine silk of the thighs and the shining satin of the bosom. Pieces of velvet hung from the columns, silk and satins stood out, on this white creamy ground, in draperies of a metallic and porcelain-like whiteness: and falling in arches were also poult and gros grain silks, light foulards, and surahs, which varied from the heavy white of a Norwegian blonde to the transparent white, warmed by the sun, of an Italian or a Spanish beauty.

The obsessive use of description masks an anxiety that perhaps woman eludes a definitive marker that seeks to contain and control her. Instead, she remains a fleeting image, poised on the brink of becoming, but never fixed.

Zola uses the love plot between Denise and Mouret in interesting ways: it fuels desire for the store. In a sense, the love plot turns into the commodity that Zola dangles in front of his readers. Commercialism-in its making possible the democratization of objects or at least the fantasy of possession-also brings about the desire to tell a love story. The store workers need the love story to satisfy their desire for substitute gratification. The love plot serves as the spectacle for the consumption of the department store workers: Denise and Mouret become then the biggest display in the novel. Just as the shoppers window-shop, the store workers and ultimately the readers must have a fantasy love story that fulfills their desire for a happy ending.

The store workers are obsessed with the story of Mouret and Denise's love, and through their gossip Denise becomes an object of exchange to be bandied about from person to person. They even take bets on the outcome: Will she yield or not? Whoever possesses the story in the text possesses the power to fascinate, to stimulate desire. The story then becomes a valuable commodity to be passed on and embellished with the accoutrements of desire. In interesting ways, the gossip about Denise fuels a desire to be in her place. In the fantasy world of The Ladies' Paradise, seduction knows no gender.

The love plot indeed leads to the ultimate desire, marriage, or the acquisition of the place of The Ladies' Paradise. The love plot functions as a kind of commodity; it reflects the readers' and the employees' desire to see love conquering all. But Zola's plot reveals that even though Mouret wins Denise at the end through her withholding her sexuality-her "goods"-his emphasis is on the mechanics of plot itself and the artificiality of that construction. In other words, the love plot begins to resemble the text's point about the construction of women. Constructing woman as a multivalent sign, Zola points to the possibility of woman's desire escaping commodification. Similarly, the love plot in the mechanical gestures of the happy ending allows for the possibility of other plots and gestures. Using the love plot that contains the idea that virtue (sexual purity) will gain Denise her man, Zola emphasizes the love plot as a commodity to satisfy readers' desires for a "happy" ending. But the artificiality of this plot subverts the idea of a happy ending. At the same time that Zola's text contains a happy ending, he demolishes it with a critique of the desire for happy endings that bind loose ends and loose identities. The text's insistence on a succession of images and substitutions to describe woman tells a story of desire that cannot be contained. The desire to narrate woman cannot be foreclosed by the "happy" ending.

Contemporary interest in cultural studies and consumer culture has sparked a renewed interest in Zola's work and in particular The Ladies' Paradise. Our current endless appetite for reality television shows parallels Zola's efforts in the latter part of nineteenth century to document reality and to make the everyday world an apt subject for the novel. While in The Ladies' Paradise Zola documents social realism, he also creates a prose poem to the modernist city in all of its bustle and splendor. And at the center of this vast city is the department store, which encapsulates the wonders and desires afforded by commerce.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 23 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2012

    Department Store Winner

    Even in translation, Zola is a great read, and this is a book to appeal to all.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2013

    What a great story! While it's different in many aspects than t

    What a great story! While it's different in many aspects than the BBC-made tv program, "The Paradise" (or rather, "The Ladies' Paradise") is intriguing and lovely. It sure causes one to think, but also, entertains with the story of Mouret and Denise, et. al.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2014

    Excellent read!

    I purchased this book after enjoying the series, The Paradise, on PBS. The original story is different in many ways from the drama, but it was quite engrossing. Zola goes into intricate and fascinating description about the growth of a large department store in 19th century Paris. He pays a great deal of attention to the relationships of the people, including the owner, the employees, and the people who own and run the smaller local shops that are gradually put out of businesses. There is also a wonderful and complicated romance story. I didn't want the book to end!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2013

    This important book is a glimpse into the evolution of the retai

    This important book is a glimpse into the evolution of the retail department store in Paris in the late 1800s, couched in the changing social order and business practices of the times. As a businesswoman, I enjoyed the business issues and reasoning articulated by the colorful contrasting characters that populate this novel. It is at The Ladies Paradise - truly a department store palace - that social classes blend into a new social order of men and women and a new retail business model unfolds.  As a romantic, I was taken in by the love story and the personal struggles and triumphs that wind their way through the halls of The Ladies Paradise establishment and the streets of Paris, exposing the passions and whims of the people of the day. Business and social change clearly has victors and victims and folly and wisdom that informs and entertains the reader. The recent PBS series "The Paradise" is based on this novel. Although the characters and plot differ considerably they are equally fascinating. Zola offers us an historical and emotionally enlightening story in any format. A worthwhile read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2013

    Sapphirewing

    A turquoise teal blue she cat with white chest paws and tip of tail. I am looking fir a mate and wanting kits im only 19 moons.

    1 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 15, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    AudioBook Review Stars:  Overall: 4  Narration: 3  Story: 5 

    AudioBook Review
    Stars:  Overall: 4  Narration: 3  Story: 5 




    Prodigious barely can encompass the volumes added to literature by Émile Zola.  In this, his eleventh book that dealt with various familial and societal relationships, Zola creates captivating characters that both serve as witness to, and participants in the great changes that are occurring throughout Paris in the post 1860's world.   Now familiar to many as the genesis idea for the PBS Masterpiece Classic series The Paradise,  it was an interesting listen as I was able to work out the direct correlations between characters and the more composite or ‘informed by’ in the television version.  




    Having read excerpts in the original French several years ago, the one lasting impression from the writing of Zola is his rich and layered use of description.  Long unused, to attempt this book now, either in written or spoken version would be daunting – I would understand little at first go, yet the beauty of the phrasing and descriptions do resonate, even if their meaning is lost. 




    The audio version is narrated by Lee Ann Howlett, to mixed effect for me I must say.  While I can appreciate the effort put forth, the mispronunciation of Monsieur, Madame, Mademoiselle (often shortened to Mill for Mlle.) served to take me away from the story at each turn.  There were some affectations of pitch and tone to elucidate a ‘younger’ speaker that were little more than grating, and I was pleased to see that as the story progressed the variations in the pitch of the speech lessened in impact.  Howlett has a wonderful voice that was well suited to the narration of the story, and it would have been a far smoother listen for me had she not adjusted to accommodate changes in characters during conversations.  




    This is ultimately a story that focuses on changes, large and small, both to society, a city and to the people who inhabit it.  Historically it was a tumultuous time with wars, political unrest, the advent of more industrialized options for manufacturing, and most countries were dealing with economic hardships and food scarcity that often resulted in migration from small communities into the cities to find work.  Denise is no different, heading to Paris to help her uncle in his small yet struggling shop.  The new thing, a full-service department store full of ‘ready-made’ goods and providing goods to entice every consumer is opening, and she soon secures a position in the ladies department.  The story not only shows the growth and changes occurring in the country and the city, but inside the store and with Denise herself, as she learns to ‘polish’ her appearance, and uses her not inconsiderable sense and reasoning to rise within the hierarchy of the store.  Like all young women, Denise has secrets and dreams, and we are fortunate to see her journey.  Far from being a staid and boring story that only will appeal to fans of historic fiction, this story has a bit of everything: conflict, history, love, loss and even drama in varying doses as the characters from the store live their lives and serve their customers. 




    I received an AudioBook copy of the title via AudioBook Jukebox for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2013

    CrimsonWhisker and PaleDove's Bios

    Name- CrimsonWhisker<p>
    Gender- Tom<p>
    Description- Crimson red tom cat with white paws and amber colored eyes<p>
    Crush- No<p>
    Mate- Wants!!!!!<p>
    Kits- No<p>
    Parents- TsumaniTwist (mom) and TornadoSwarm (dad)<p>
    Siblings- MudslideTumble (brother) and HurricanePower (sister)<p>
    Rank- Warrior<p>
    Name~ PaleDove<p>
    Gender~ Tom<p>
    Description~ Dove grey tom with pale green eyes<p>
    Crush~ No<p>
    Mate~ Wants!!!!!<p>
    Kits~ No<p>
    Parents~ WolfTail (mom) and FoxSprint (dad)<p>
    Siblings~ CougarWhip (brother), BearClaw (brother), and CoyoteStripe (sister)<p>
    Rank~ Warrior

    0 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2013

    EclispeStone

    [NAME] EclispeStone <p> [AGE] 9 Molns <p> [LOOKS] Looks like a mini NightClaw with golden eye and speckles of red. <p> [HISTORY] Was adopted by a she named Sapphirewing. She told the clan tjat Nigjtclaw died. Eclispe got mad at her ad left her. Nightclaw became his adopted brother. <p> [CRUSH/MAT] None. <p> [PERSONALITY] Dark. <p> [KIN] Le same as NightClaw's) <p> Goodbye!

    0 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2013

    Startlingkit URGENT

    Im locked out of res 1!!!

    0 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2013

    Mistfur Bio Updated!!!

    Name---Uhhh......Is it Mistfur? Gender---Female. Duh. Age---Unknown but quite young. Mate---None yet!!! Crush---Swamp-oops!!! Kits---None but really wants some. Appearence---Beautiful white fur. Has silver tinges. (See Ivypools picture on the second book fourth series.) Blue eyes. Fluffy and silky fur. Feathery tail. Personality---Sweet and quiet. Cares deeply for Blackpaw. Chatty at some times. A bit stubborn. Super scared of water. Kin---Blacklight (mate missing) Lionkit and Flamekit (kits missing) Ghostwhisp (mom dead) Waterrush (dad dead) Snowfall and Sunleaf (sisters dead) Whitefoot (brother dead). History---A few seasons ago she lived in a Clan with a river running through it. One day when she was collecting herbs for the med cat a huge storm rolled in. She took residence in a cave. When she returned to camp she found her mate kits friends and family swimming for their lives. She was too high up on a hill to help her clanmates in the gorge. She saw them sink under the surface one by one. She tried to help but with no prevail. Later after the water level fell she ran to camp. She found every body except her mate and kits. She still belives they are alive.

    0 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2013

    LastRose,DistantPaw,GingerPaw

    ~•LastRose•~ <p>
    Rank~ Warrior <br>
    Gender~ Female <br>
    Mate~ BrackenStar <br>
    Crush~ BrackenStar <br>
    Kits~ DistantPaw•Son•,GingerPaw•Daughter• and CalicoPaw•Son• <br>
    Apperance~ A light brown tabby shecat with darker brown stripes. Her paws are white. Her chest is white with a reddish oak rose mark in the center. Shes slender with longlegs. <br>
    Family~ <br>
    DistantPaw~Son <br>
    GingerPaw~Daughter <br>
    CalicoPaw~Son <br>
    BrackenStar~Mate•^_^• <br>
    Theme Song~ Diamonds by Rhianana. <p>
    >}•3•)< DistantPaw <p>
    Male <br>
    Crush on Mistfur <br>
    No mate <br>
    No kits <br>
    Handsome tom, looks exactly like Brackenstar but with sunset orange eyes. <br>
    Family~ <br>
    Last~Mother <br>
    Bracken~Father <br>
    Ginger~Sister, <br>
    Calico~ Brother <br>
    No theme song <p>
    #Gingeh <p>
    SheCat <br>
    Apprentice <br>
    No crush or mate <br>
    Looks exactly like lastrose, green eyes. <br>
    Family~ Look at Distantpaws. <p>
    I rushed! I had to go!

    0 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2013

    Lilyghost and co. UPDATE

    Lilyghost . Shecat . Warrior . 20 moons . White she cat with pale pink legs with black paws with heather purple eyes with black on the edge .. she is nice talkative sweet can appear from no where . Crush maybe ;) . Mate no . Kits nope . Ghostjay is mom . Leech is dad . Moonjay is sister . Swampfire is a friend of moonjays . Panda is a friend of the family . My history is tooo boring . I rp her ........
    <p>g
    <p>g
    Moonjay . Shecat . Medcat . 20 moons . Silverish gray shecat with dark blue paws and chest she has ice blue eyes with teal on the edge .. is is nice caring loyal brave . crush nope . Mate nope . Kits nope . Ghostjay is mom . Leech is dad . Lilyghost is sister . Swampfire is my friend . Panda is a friend of the family . my history is just as boring as lilyghosts . Megan rps her . Megan also has cancer and cant rp much ..........
    <p>e
    <p>e
    Swampfire . Tom . Warrior . 19 moons . He is a brownish green tom with red paws and tail his tail is very puffy he has green eyes with flecks of gold in them ... nice strong brave overprotective . Crush is mistfur . Mate nope . Kits nope . Kin blazestorm is mom . Oakleaf is dad . Chickadeeclaw is sister . Calahan is kittypet sister . Lilyghost and moonjay are his friends . History is boring and i wonder why i fail in it . Josh rps him .....
    <p>h
    <p>h
    Pandaeye but he goes by panda . Tom . Warrior . 16 moons . He is a black tom with a white tail and paw he has black eyes but he has a blind eye that the blindness (u can tell he is blind because it is a milky white color ) is in the shape of a panda . caring gentle loyal can get overprotective at times . Crush it is a secret hint it starts with b. Mate nope . Kits nope . Halfpelt is mom . Angeldeath is dad . Halfface is sister . Cowstampede is brother . He is a friend to moonjays family . History cant tell u . Chris rps him .......
    <p>r
    <p>r
    Halfface . Shecat . Warrior . age unknown . she is a black she cat with silver stripes she has puffy paws and tail her good eye is gold with flecks of silver the other half of her face she lost when she was a kit she wont talk about it so DONT ask . Nice sweet good runner swift agile . Crush maybe . Mate nope . Kits nope . Kin is the same as pandaeyes . Histiry i wont tell u .... i rp her . I am julia btw ...........

    0 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2013

    Nightclaw

    NAME: Nightclaw AGE: 25 moons LOOKS: Hes a skinny jet black tom with blood red eyes, has long legs and a long tail, eyes twitches sometimes. CRUSH: Snowclaw MATE: Snowclaw KITS: Hopes to have some with Snowclaw sometime in the future. KIN: Soaringjay (brother missing) Wildheart (sister missing) Jaggedfur (brother missing) Dawnsky (sister dead) Shadowflame (father missing) Wolfsong (mother dead) EXTRA: Insane, sly, able to hide in shadows. INFO: Thinks of Eclipsepaw as his little brother, like Sonic and Tails. Has a scar over his right eye. Claws and fangs are unusually sharp. HISTORY: He used to live in Mistclan, but one day, Twolegs who were fishing got to smoking, and decided to drop their cigarettes, without putting them out.The fire roared and burned down the cats who had stayed in the camp, while the others on the hunting patrol survived. Nightclaw was devastated, searching moons for his family. The rest of the hunting patrol was never found, and nightclaw ran, wishing for a new life. He found Wingclan, and found his new home. He now lives there, staying in his den at the last result.

    0 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2013

    Snowclaw's bio

    Gender-She-Cat;Age-Around 22 moons; Eyes-Cyan;Pelt- Black and white;Siblings-Dead;Personality-Calm,Kind,Intelligent,;Crush/Mate-Nightclaw;Kits-None, hopefully Wispkit

    0 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2013

    Swiftkit

    Gender shecat five moons old has a dark past mate none rank kit grey pelt with iceblue eyes has a scar on her back if you look under her fur parent were assenins

    0 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2013

    Titan

    Im a well used to be rogue who got captured by abusive twolegs. Im all silver. With sea blue eyes. Im also 26 moons old

    0 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)