Lark in the Morning: The Early Years

The Lark in the Morning: The Early Years

5.0 3
by Steeleye Span
     
 
Lark in the Morning: The Early Years is a mid-priced, two-disc rendering of the band's first three records. Remastered for the first time, Hark! the Village Wait, Please to See the King, and Ten Man Mop are featured in their entirety, and in their original sequence, making this an absolute necessity for fans, and a perfect entry point for

Overview

Lark in the Morning: The Early Years is a mid-priced, two-disc rendering of the band's first three records. Remastered for the first time, Hark! the Village Wait, Please to See the King, and Ten Man Mop are featured in their entirety, and in their original sequence, making this an absolute necessity for fans, and a perfect entry point for the uninitiated. Steeleye Span are masters of arrangement, and nowhere is that more evident than on their debut. Though familial tension ran high during its recording, Hark! the Village Wait yielded some of the most agreeable tunes the band ever laid to tape. Beginning with the a cappella "A Calling-On Song," the group established itself as peerless singers, utilizing the dual lead vocals of sirens Gay Woods and Maddy Prior to a tee, particularly on "My Johnny Was a Shoemaker" and "Dark Eyed Sailor." The lineup is legendary, rivaling only Fairport Convention in their Sandy Denny/Richard Thompson heyday. Ashley Hutchings, Dave Mattacks, Tim Hart, future Pogue Terry Woods, and Gay and Maddy produced a landmark album that continues to inspire countless musicians and fans alike. For their follow-up, British-folk icon Marin Carthy and former classical violinist Peter Knight were brought in to replace the departed Woods family, resulting in a more challenging, folk-based approach. The disappearance of drums gave the songs on Please to See the King the distinct timbre of electric medieval music, using Hutchings' bass in lieu of a courtly tambourine. The record yielded beautiful ballads ("Lovely on the Water") and brutal electric dirges ("Boys of Bedlam") anchored by Prior's and Hart's lilting pipes and Knight's complex violin parts. The reissue includes a cover of the Buddy Holly hit "Rave On," explained by Hart as "an idea the record company had for a possible novelty hit." While not their strongest, Please to See the King signaled the beginnings of a real force in the burgeoning world of folk-rock. Ten Man Mop finds the group getting sparser still. Like the gritty live act they had become, the songs straddle the fence between hauntingly beautiful (the gorgeous "Wee Weaver") and drunk and jaunty ("Marrowbones" and "Four Nights Drunk"). An added bonus is the inclusion of "General Taylor," a long sought after piece of vocal magic that sounds right at home at disc's end. The excellent remastering job does wonders, especially on King and Mop, warming up the analog hiss and removing some of the more piercing elements that plagued earlier versions. A 12-page booklet with liner notes by the bandmembers, as well as some photos, rounds out this irreplaceable collection from one of folk-rock's -- or any genre for that matter -- most influential and rewarding outfits.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/16/2003
Label:
Castle Music Uk
UPC:
5050159178124
catalogNumber:
781

Related Subjects

Tracks

Disc 1

  1. A Calling-On Song
  2. The Blacksmith
  3. Fisherman's Wife
  4. The Blackleg Miner
  5. The Dark-Eyed Sailor
  6. Copshawholme Fair
  7. All Things Are Quite Silent
  8. The Hills of Greenmore
  9. My Johnny Was a Shoemaker
  10. Lowlands of Holland
  11. Twa Corbies
  12. One Night as I Lay on My Bed
  13. The Blacksmith
  14. Cold, Haily, Windy Night
  15. Jigs: Bryan O'Lynn/the Hag With the Money [Medley]
  16. Prince Charlie Stuart
  17. Boys of Bedlam
  18. False Knight on the Road

Disc 2

  1. The Lark In the Morning
  2. Female Drummer
  3. The King
  4. Lovely on the Water
  5. Rave On
  6. The Gower Wassail
  7. Jigs: Paddy Clancey's Jig/Willie Clancey's Fancy [Medley]
  8. Four Nights Drunk
  9. When I Was on Horseback
  10. Marrowbones
  11. Captain Coulston
  12. Reels: Dowd's Favourite/£10 Float/the Morning Dew [Medley]
  13. Wee Weaver
  14. Skewball
  15. General Taylor

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Steeleye Span   Primary Artist
Martin Carthy   Organ,Banjo,Guitar,Vocals,Bells
Tim Hart   Organ,Dulcimer,Fiddle,Guitar,Mandolin,Electric Guitar,Harmonium,Vocals,Bells,5-string Banjo,Electric Dulcimer
Maddy Prior   Tambourine,Vocals,Bells,Spoons,Tabor,5-string Banjo
Ashley Hutchings   Electric Bass,Bass Guitar,Vocals,Bells
Gerry Conway   Drums,Guest Appearance
Dave Mattacks   Drums,Guest Appearance
Gay Woods   Autoharp,Concertina,Vocals,Bodhran
Terry Woods   Mandolin,Concertina,Electric Guitar,Vocals,Mandola,5-string Banjo
Peter Knight   Organ,Fiddle,Mandolin,Bass Guitar,Vocals,Bells,Timpani,Tenor Banjo

Technical Credits

Martin Carthy   Arranger
Tim Hart   Arranger
Ewan MacColl   Composer
Maddy Prior   Arranger,Step Dancing
Steeleye Span   Producer
Ashley Hutchings   Arranger,Composer
Norman Petty   Composer
Jerry Boys   Engineer
Victor Gamm   Engineer
Bob Potter   Engineer
Roger Quested   Engineer
Gay Woods   Arranger,Step Dancing
Terry Woods   Arranger
Roger Mayer   Engineer
Sandy Roberton   Producer
Bill Tilghman   Composer
Sonny West   Composer
Nicolas Jones   Composer
Traditional   Composer
Peter Knight   Arranger
Geoff Wall   Liner Notes,Sleeve Notes

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The Lark in the Morning: The Early Years 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Marek More than 1 year ago
The first three releases by seminal "folk-rock" act Steeleye Span on two cd's. Unlike some repackaging, these discs maintain the same running order as they did when first released so the transition of the band is readily apparent. The first disc features session drummers as well as the wonderful vocals of Terry and Gay Woods as well as the superb Maddy Prior. Very polished for a first release in a new genre'of music. By the end of the first disc a major change has occured-no drumming-and no Terry and Gay Woods, but something equally important in Martin Carthy and the fiddle(violin?) of Peter Knight occurs. An excellent line up with great vocals, superb instruments as well as a great selection of songs. Too bad this line up had so short a history for the band would again morph into another line up shortly there after. Fine liner notes and a couple of interesting pictures as well as another song not included in the original releases.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago