The Last Blind Date

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Overview

A fun, charming memoir about a woman who falls in love, packs her bags, and starts over in the city that eats its young.

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Overview

A fun, charming memoir about a woman who falls in love, packs her bags, and starts over in the city that eats its young.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this era of cyber-romance, Yellin (Such a Lovely Couple) and Randy Arthur bucked the trend: they were set up by friends, courted via phone, and dated long-distance before their eventual marriage. Anyone who’s been gun-shy about romance will identify with the pairs’ initial resistance—Yellin, a divorcée, had endured more than enough of the titular blind dates, and Arthur was very recently divorced with shared custody of his two children. The author writes of the comfort of their “700-mile emotional safety zone” and notes that, for her, the “possibility of a relationship was easier to handle than an actual relationship.” But after two-plus years of edging ever closer, the pair decide to marry and Yellin moves from Chicago to join Arthur in New York City. The author’s depictions of her attempts to start a new life strike a nice balance between serious and funny, from the goings-on at her ill-fated new job to her earnest attempts to make friends at the gym, and at home with her stepchildren. Yellin’s story is not only a delight to read but an inspiring example of the good that can come from taking risks, even when it’s uncomfortable and scary. (Nov.)
From The Critics
"This is why Linda Yellin's The Last Blind Date is the perfect story of falling in love: it doesn't exist in the fairy tale realm. It happened here - well, in New York City. What you'll take from this charming, breezy memoir of a long-distance love affair is that romance in reality is all the more rewarding for the practical ups and downs that come along for the ride…For Linda, love arrived with Randy, her almost-divorced, father of two,who lives in the entirely wrong city. These kind of mundane obstacles never appear in romance novels, but reading about Linda and Randy working through long-distance problems, blending a family, and breaking down the walls around her scarred heart will give you a renewed sense of joy. Fairy tales do come true.”
Sally Koslow
“A valentine for optimism, risk-taking, and love itself. With self-deprecating charm, Yellin takes her reader on a journey from Chicago to Manhattan, eviscerating New York City folkways with gentle yet biting wit.”
BN Romance Blog Heart-to-Heart on The Last Blind Date
"This is why Linda Yellin's The Last Blind Date is the perfect story of falling in love: it doesn't exist in the fairy tale realm. It happened here - well, in New York City. What you'll take from this charming, breezy memoir of a long-distance love affair is that romance in reality is all the more rewarding for the practical ups and downs that come along for the ride…For Linda, love arrived with Randy, her almost-divorced, father of two,who lives in the entirely wrong city. These kind of mundane obstacles never appear in romance novels, but reading about Linda and Randy working through long-distance problems, blending a family, and breaking down the walls around her scarred heart will give you a renewed sense of joy. Fairy tales do come true.”
Jennie Fields
"Hilarious. Unexpected. Knife-in-the-Side Sharp. Somewhere, surely, Nora Ephron is smiling."
Amanda Robb
"As romantic and fun as When Harry Met Sally or Sleepless in Seattle, Linda Yellin's hilarious, heartfelt novel is an urban fairy tale of sophisticated humor and touching charm."
Mia March
"Reading Linda Yellin is like spending much-needed time with your funniest, dearest friend."
Anita Hughes
"Filled with a delightful cast of characters, What Nora Knew is a smart, laugh-out-loud love story with a sparkling heroine. I loved it!"
Kathryn Leigh Scott
"With What Nora Knew, Linda Yellin has written an irresistibly funny, authentic novel about the two-steps-forward-one-step-back pursuit of life, love and career in New York City. She writes for all of us with Molly Hallberg's laugh-out-loud, poignant inability to accept she's met her equal, while everyone around her takes the plunge. Yellin is a Nora Ephron inspired humorist with a voice of her own."
Emily Listfield
“I laughed my way through Linda Yellin's What Nora Knew—when I wasn't nodding in recognition. Witty, wise, insightful,and altogether charming.”
Tracey Jackson
“Linda Yellin’s lively story sparkles and dances off the page.”
Christine Haag
“An engaging romp through one woman's quest to find love and happiness in Manhattan, Linda Yellin’s novel is by turns touching and funny, and her heroine has charm and chutzpah to spare.”
Ann Hood
"Warm and funny and honest."
Elizabeth Villars
"Linda Yellin has moved into Wendy Wasserstein territory and made it her own.”
Susan Kenney
"Such a rare, ringing clarity of tone and vision...the emotions, the dialogue, the scenery are just dead on...I couldn't put it down."
Kirkus Reviews

A single, middle-aged, Midwestern author and magazine writer's life is transformed after being set up with a commitment-phobic man from New York.

Yellin (Such a Lovely Couple, 1991) recounts the trials of long-distance romance, becoming a stepmother and creating a life on the East Coast. Five years after a marriage that ended in heartbreak, the author finally acknowledged her loneliness. She was ready for romance, but she didn't want to experience the hassles that accompany dating. "I longed to skip the getting-to-know-you part and immediately jump to the rent-a-movie-and-order-in–some-Chinese part," she writes." Her relationship with Randy began with a long-distance phone call, progressed to longer calls and then trips to New York. After two years of dating, Yellin finally met his children. The couple married, and the author began the difficult adjustment to the unfamiliar terrain of her family and city. "When I wasn't trying to navigate the children," she writes, "I was trying to navigate New York." The majority of the narrative consists ofYellin's humorous accounts of decipheringthe subway system; understanding the differences between being Jewish and from Chicago and being Jewish and from New York; and becoming a good stepmother. The author also candidly describes the hothouse environment of her new job overseeing the advertising for a TV network. "The network was packed with women in their forties all going through their menopausal worst on the same day: throwing tantrums, screaming in the hallways, slamming doors," she writes. "I felt like I was in a women's prison movie except instead of a cell I had a corner office."Eventually, the author began to feel at home, and she made peace with her stepchildren.

Filled with lots of girl-talk, this memoir will appeal to readers who can't get enough of the beginning, middle and sweet endings of love stories.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781451625899
  • Publisher: Gallery Books
  • Publication date: 10/4/2011
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 693,623
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Linda Yellin writes humor pieces for More magazine. She wrote numerous short stories for Redbook magazine back when they still published short stories and was a regular guest on SiriusXM Radio’s women’s talk show, "Broadminded." Her writing career began in advertising where she wrote headlines for shampoos, hamburgers, and cheese. Get the scoop at LindaYellin.com.

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Read an Excerpt

Last Blind Date

When Randy Arthur of New York City separated from the first Mrs. Arthur, he left home with two suitcases, the stereo speakers, an agreement he’d get the children alternate weekends and every Tuesday and Thursday night, and a Five-Year Plan.

It broke his heart to leave the children, left him broke to leave Mrs. Arthur, but after years of feeling unappreciated by the woman he’d married twelve years earlier, it was a decision he felt compelled to make.

As Five-Year Plans go, Randy’s wasn’t up there with, say, Stalin’s Five-Year Plans to industrialize the Soviet Union, but still, he felt a strong commitment to it. He’d focus on work, the children, pay the bills—and have lots of short-term, noncommittal, no-strings-attached relationships with a variety of beautiful women.

He was honest with the women he dated; told them right up front that he didn’t want to get involved. But of course they never believed him. He was too attentive, too affectionate; in lieu of their names he called them “sweetheart” and “beautiful,” leaving each woman under the impression that she was his beautiful sweetheart.

As soon as anyone got too close, attempted to buy theater tickets for shows months away, or suggested he redecorate the living room of his small one-bedroom apartment, maybe hang some pretty curtains, he said a gentle good-bye. His priority was the children, whom he never introduced to any of the beautiful sweethearts; he didn’t want eight-year-old Phoebe and five-year-old Benjamin growing attached to women who would soon be moving on. It was a good plan, and because of his up-frontness with each succeeding participant, arguably an honorable plan, and should have been reasonably successful if he hadn’t screwed it up in Year Two.

His best friend Dan who now lived in California suggested Randy call Linda who lived in Chicago and was the best friend of Dan’s girlfriend Lynn. And if you failed to track that, ignore it, continue on, and go with the flow.

“What do I need with calling some woman who lives seven hundred miles away?” Randy asked Dan. In the interest of male bonding they spoke on the phone almost every week.

“My gut says you’ll like her.” Dan had a large gut so Randy tended to trust it. “She was here last year right before you were. She’s tall. Dark hair. Decent body. She wrote a book. You should read her book. See what you think.”

“What’s her book about?”

“Her dead husband.”

“Great. Already she sounds like fun.”

“What have you got to lose?” Dan said.

“Airfare,” Randy said.

But after Randy’s current girlfriend started mumbling things about maybe leaving a toothbrush at his apartment, Randy began to think there might be certain advantages to dating someone out of town. Get together. Share a few laughs. Score some easy gratuitous sex, then escape on a plane. Talk about your no strings attached. The only thing better than a woman you don’t plan to see again is a woman you’ll never run into again.

So he called me.

Fifteen years ago I published a novel to no acclaim whatsoever. If by any chance you did happen to read it (and if you claim to have done so, I know you’re lying unless you’re my mother, one of my two sisters, or a handful of ex-boyfriends who were just making sure I didn’t slander them)—well, if you were one of those six people, you’d already know the following:

Two weeks after college graduation I married a tall, handsome, damaged young man who’d spent three years in the Marines, one of them in Vietnam. He was sweet. He was confused. He was depressed. I was in over my head.

We had what was then called a whirlwind courtship, but I’d now call a what-the-hell-were-we-thinking courtship: engaged in six weeks. We met in college from different starting points. Small town—big city. Baptist—Jewish. He saw me as easygoing and uncomplicated. I saw him as strong and complex. The only other Vietnam vets I ever ran across were the ones I’d see on TV crime shows, their backgrounds always revealed during the big finish, right after they were arrested for hacking off a little old lady’s head.

“Why did he do it?” someone would ask, and a detective with a somber voice and a bad brown suit would offer up the answer: “’Nam.”

I loved that Teddy was a former Marine. What’s sexier than a man who looks good in a uniform, fights for his country, and can wield an M16?

Okay, probably a lot of things. But when I was twenty-two years old, the Marine credential seemed like a good enough reason to get married. I just didn’t know how to convince my new husband to maybe get a job. Or go back to school. To not stay in bed all day tormented and despondent.

In time he did rouse himself. He left me to drive to Alaska in his powder blue Volkswagen Bug with its oil leaks and broken heater. His plan was to find a job working on the pipeline. Seven weeks later he returned and announced he wanted to be a banker.

By then I was confused. How’d he turn into a banker?

He was hired by the First National Bank of Chicago to sit behind a desk on the main floor of their Erie Street branch opening new accounts and helping senior citizens balance their checkbooks. I worked in an advertising agency writing headlines for shampoo, a job he considered shallow.

We stopped talking, afraid to acknowledge the mistake that was us. We took separate vacations. One year Teddy went fly-fishing with his high school buddies while I visited my college roommate in Washington, D.C. Another year he went camping in Wisconsin with some guys he met at the bank while I visited a girlfriend who had moved to Boston.

After ten years of marriage, without ever really being married, we divorced. He moved to Oregon to learn carpentry and build furniture. I rearranged my closets and remained in Chicago. But we always stayed in touch, exchanging phone calls and letters.

He died of brain cancer four years later.

We were together his last nine months.

After the funeral I spent a year of sleepless nights blaming myself for every sad or lonely moment in his life—even the ones that took place before we met. I know it’s self-centered to think I’d been the cause of someone else’s every misery, but that’s how bad off I was: too angry at myself to realize I was too involved with myself.

While the world slept, I agonized.

Why’d I stay on the pill when he wanted a baby?

Why’d I say no when he wanted to move to La Jolla and study oceanography?

Why wasn’t I nicer to his mother?

I’d cry in the bathtub long past the water turning cold. I ignored my Bruce Springsteen tapes in favor of Billie Holiday. I felt so hopeless about the future that I didn’t contribute to my IRA. People who once desired my company were more likely having conversations like this:

“Let’s throw a party!”

“Swell idea.”

“But do we have to invite you-know?”

Linda? No way!” “Ugh.” “She’s a bummer!” “Miserable woman.” “She’ll bring down the whole night.”

Even I wanted to avoid me.

I had always been one of those cheery, hopeful types. Half-full glasses. Silver linings. Lemonade out of lemons. Among my friends, I was considered the optimist. But for me, Teddy’s death was the first time the words everything will turn out fine—turned out to be a lie.

At night I wrote in search of answers. During the day I dragged myself between my apartment and my job. Bus drivers admonished me, “Let’s see a smile!”—these were Midwestern bus drivers. The truly unaware and insensitive would ask, “Hey, lady—who died?”

Friends eager to fix me tried fixing me up. And sometimes, just to get everyone off my back—particularly the friends of my mother with eligible sons, nephews, or wards of the state—I’d say yes.

There was germ-phobic George, who invited me to his apartment for our first date. He was afraid to go outside and breathe the air. He sat behind his big mahogany desk and motioned me to the seat on the opposite side.

“Is this a date or an interview?” I asked.

“I’m waiting for a call from my lawyer,” he said, then proceeded to tell me about his previous home, the brownstone in the Gold Coast on State Street (which if you’ve never been to Chicago is code for: I’m rich) that turned out to be riddled with asbestos. Every nook. Every cranny. Just recounting the story was enough to make beads of sweat appear on George’s forehead.

Keeping his words measured and precise, apparently surmising that I could only understand if he spoke s-l-o-w-l-y, George explained that he had just upped and walked away, leaving behind his Ralph Lauren Purple Label sport coats, his Thomasville furniture, his twenty-gallon freshwater fish tank built into the wall of his master bedroom—and moved to his current apartment with the excellent ventilation system.

I wasn’t sympathetic sitting there on my side of the desk. I suggested that if he was so worried about creepy crawlers, maybe he should get his white carpets cleaned.

My dating skills needed some fine-tuning.

One week later, my friend Barbara wanted to fix me up with her depressed cousin, whose mother had just died of cancer.

“What do we have in common?” I asked. “Cancer and depression?”

My cousin Dolores fixed me up with a businessman friend of her husband’s who cooked dinner for me: shrimp curry and something so exotic I still can’t pronounce the name. After the strawberry parfaits—“made with real whipped cream, not Cool Whip,” he was quick to point out—he leaned back in his chair and smiled at me. “I have terrific hands,” he said. “Would you like me to crack your neck?”

Then there was Shish Ka-Bob, who took me to a Turkish restaurant and fancied himself a comedian. He’d say things like “May I be frank?” And when I said sure, he’d say: “Swell! Because my real name’s Bob!”

I feel sorry for myself just remembering these dates.

The low point came when I let my friend Liz talk me into attending a Jewish Singles Super Bowl Party. A theme party for lovers of football and Moses held in the paneled basement of a synagogue. The guests were more determined than the football players.

Or maybe it was the guy who left his dog in the car while he fed me, and then left me in the car while he walked his dog. This was a man I knew had dog hairs on his bed linens.

And why did I let my mother’s cleaning lady fix me up with one of her clients?

“I hear you’re really neat,” I said, when the client and I first spoke on the phone. His name was Martin. “I don’t mean as in really cool, but as in—you pick your socks up off the floor.”

There was a long pause.

“Well, I am rather tidy,” he said.

The conversation never got more heated than that.

I was angry at every man I met. In the back of my heart I felt disloyal to Teddy, like I was cheating on him by moving forward with my life, by being alive when he no longer was. At least I wasn’t cheating on him with anyone good.

I’d return home from dates and bury myself behind my computer.

Maybe my book didn’t sell because it had the all-time worst cover design in the history of, well . . . cover designs: a photo of a pathetic-looking girl with a Mamie Eisenhower hairdo making cow eyes and clinging to the arm of a young man clearly too good for her. A perfect cover if the book were a primer for low self-esteem.

But even if people have no intention of ever reading your book, they generally think it’s impressive that you’re published. Of all the monikers a person can slap on themselves—abolitionist, abortionist, arsonist (I’m starting with the A’s)—novelist is one of the better ones.

I was waiting for a box of free pencils at work one day when the man in charge of the office supplies closet said: “So, I heard you wrote a book.”

“Uh, yeah. I did.”

“What’s the name of it?”

I told him, only to see his immediate disappointment when I didn’t answer Lonesome Dove or War and Peace.

“Never heard of it,” he said, in an accusatory voice, like if he hadn’t heard of it, I wasn’t a real writer. “But, hey, I think it’s cool.”

Strangers felt compelled to tell me their life stories so I could write about them. My landlord requested my autograph on something other than a rent check. While sharing an elevator, the stamp-collecting neighbor who lived next door said, “Gee, I’m afraid to say anything. It might end up in a book.” While I thought: You should only be so interesting.

No one was prouder than my mother. The only thing that could have made her happier was if I found a new husband. She hated seeing me unattached. She was embarrassed that I wasn’t married with three kids.

Five years after Teddy’s death, even I admitted I was lonely. Not alone. But achingly lonely. Falling in love again didn’t sound so terrible. I just didn’t want to have to date to get there. I longed to skip the getting-to-know-you part and immediately jump to the rent-a-movie-and-order-in-some-Chinese part.

Which, in a way, is how I met Randy.

I flew to California the week of Valentine’s Day to visit my friend Lynn and avoid Valentine’s Day. California’s an excellent place to ignore a holiday. Lynn was newly in love with Dan, a Hollywood cameraman who once worked on a movie with Eddie Murphy.

“It’s a good thing you weren’t coming next week,” she told me while fluffing the pillows on the bed in her guest room. Lynn’s the nurturing type, a pillow fluffer and cookie baker. “Dan’s friend Randy is coming out from New York, so the guest room is booked.”

Months later I was home on a Sunday night watching a movie and eating Chinese when the phone rang.

“This is Randy Arthur,” the voice on the other end said. “Do you know who I am?”

“Sure,” I said. “You and I have slept in the same bed, only at different times.”

“Well,” he said, “timing is everything.”

We spoke for forty-five minutes. A record for me. But the guy lived out of town. What could be less threatening? And halfway through the Reader’s Digest versions of our life stories, it turned out to be one of those conversations where whatever either of you says, the other’s responding:

“Oh yeah? Me, too.”

“Really? Me, too.”

We both loved Gilligan’s Island. We both hated the musical Cats. We both preferred Swiss cheese over American. I found myself thinking: At last, somebody understands me.

I asked if he liked his mother and he said yes, he loved his mother, passing my Do you have issues with women? test.

He asked if I liked snakes, and I didn’t exactly say I loved snakes or sought out their company, but told him, no, I’m not afraid of snakes and how in high school science class I was the student who volunteered to wrap the visiting boa constrictor around my neck. Then he told me about Curly, his kids’ pet red-tail boa constrictor kept in a glass tank in the living room, passing his Do you have issues with cold-blooded animals? test, while promptly flunking my Good Taste in Living Rooms test.

He said, “I read your book.”

“Really? Me, too. That makes two of us now. How’d you end up reading it?”

“Dan insisted.”

“I should hire him as my publicist. It’s interesting waking up every day knowing you can be purchased used and new on Amazon for thirty-three cents.”

“I liked you in it,” Randy said.

“Really?”

“A lot.”

“It’s fiction,” I said.

“Yes, of course. Fiction.”

He kept calling. I wanted him to call. I know it sounds peculiar that I could break out of a depression after one good phone call, but by then I was looking for an excuse to be happy.

Leslie was a therapist and three-time divorcee. She tended to be a tad cynical about romance. “You should cut to the chase and go meet him,” she said. We were stretched out on lawn chairs in her backyard, tanning our arms and legs while wearing huge sun hats to avoid wrinkling our faces. “Otherwise you’ll start fantasizing about him, make him into some sort of Prince Charming, and be disappointed when he turns out to be just another maniac who spent his childhood drowning kittens.”

“What if he really is Prince Charming?”

“See. You’re doing it already.” She let out a long sigh. Everything about Leslie was long. Her legs. Her arms. Her wild, frizzy red hair spitting out from beneath her hat. Even her gold hoop earrings were long, practically grazing her shoulders.

Leslie had mixed a large pitcher of margaritas and we were each polishing off our second glasses.

“Randy’s got a great voice,” I told her. “Authoritative but sexy.”

Leslie snorted. “Voices don’t predict shit about a person. Visualize a radio DJ based on his voice and then get ahold of his photograph. It’s always unbelievable—that smooth, sultry voice belongs to that face?” She refilled her glass, held the pitcher up at a slight tilt to offer me more; she looked like a mother in a Kool-Aid commercial. “Have you seen a photo?” she asked.

“Yes. He’s cute. Owns a suit and tie.”

“Cute doesn’t mean diddly,” she said. “The man could still have body odor. Meet him before you waste any more time.”

In bed that night, listening to Springsteen’s “Roll of the Dice,” I phoned my friend Annabelle. She was planning to be in New York the following month for almost two weeks, on expense account, in a midtown hotel. Annabelle runs stress reduction seminars for top executives of large corporations. It’s a lucrative profession because everybody has stress and nobody wants it. I asked Annabelle if I could stay with her, visit over the weekend, so I could check out if Randy was a kitty-drowning maniac with body odor.

“Good plan,” she said. “The longer you wait to meet him, the more tension you may experience.”

Annabelle hated tension. Everything about Annabelle was relaxed. Her minimal makeup. Her flowing cotton dresses. Her languid hand gestures. Even her curls were relaxed.

“Start with dinner,” she advised. “Pay close attention to how he approaches dinner.” After extended personal research on her part, Annabelle believed that a man makes love the same way that he eats a meal. “If he dives in without paying any real attention to the experience, if he’s just focused on feeling full—he’ll be the same way in bed. A man who shoves his food around his plate, who’s not quite sure what to do with it, won’t know a vagina from a hole in the wall. But a man who savors each part of his meal, pausing to sniff, taste, and admire every course—well, then you’re heading toward dessert.”

After we hung up and I spent several minutes thinking I might never eat with Annabelle again, I called Randy.

“If I happen to be in New York Columbus Day weekend, will you buy me dinner?”

“Sure,” he said. “We can do more than dinner.” He must have paused to consult his calendar before he asked, “Would you like to go to a bar mitzvah?”

That I didn’t expect.

“For my friend’s son,” he added.

Okay. So it wasn’t the sexiest offer I ever got, but I said, sure, why not? If Randy turned out to be a disappointment, at least there’d be a sweet table.

Two weeks later Randy invited himself to Chicago. He said that waiting over a month to meet me was too long. I could picture him in New York surrounded by his guy friends all egging him on to find out sooner rather than later if I was a maniac.

We exchanged descriptions so we’d recognize each other at the airport.

“I have a hunchback, hairy legs, and two missing teeth,” I told him.

“My entire body’s tattooed with Grateful Dead lyrics,” he told me.

I wasn’t sure what first impression I wanted to convey. Sexy and mysterious? Happy-go-lucky? Maybe blasé and nonchalant—like those rock stars who show up on The Tonight Show wearing old blue jeans and torn T-shirts. I opted for pert and optimistic: a yellow culottes dress with an orange belt, orange espadrilles, and L’Oréal Medium Ash Brown.

I borrowed my cousin Dolores’s Lexus to pick him up.

Waiting for Randy at the gate, I started to have second thoughts, followed by third and fourth thoughts. What if we hate each other? This could be the longest, most painful blind date in history.

When the plane landed I watched the other passengers walk off and tried to guess which ones were the New Yorkers and which ones the Chicagoans. By the time a guy matching Randy’s photograph finally emerged, I was wondering if I’d been stood up. The only other people getting off the plane were crew members.

He waved at me as he approached. I waved back.

He wasn’t as tall as I expected, but tall enough; his hair more pepper than salt. The majority of the men I dated post-Teddy were bald, a circumstance I attributed to age and coincidence, not because I gravitated toward scalps. A head with hair earned definite brownie points along with the pressed khakis and the pin-striped shirt with the rolled sleeves. If I were writing a headline for his look, it would’ve been NATTY YET CLASSIC!

He walked closer with a big smile and an unzipped fly. I was too mortified for him to point it out.

He said, “Hello, sweetheart.”

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 7, 2011

    Loved it! Loved it! Loved it!

    I've been mourning Wendy Wasserstein for years - and here's an author with the same warm, funny wit and insightful charm. Welcome, Linda Yellin!
    So many memoirs are just plain out depressing and this one kept me smiling throughout. There are real issues - taking a risk for love - should you give up your life to move to a new city when you can never really be sure if the guy's worth it (this one definitely is); taking on stepchildren (the family scenes are reminiscent of the best of Erma Bombeck); being ostracized at a job in television (clearly Lifetime for Women although disguised in the book); and the sheer loneliness of not having girlfriends in a new city. (The chapter "Dating for Girlfriends" is both poignant and hilarious.) This is a terrific read that you'll want to share with your own girlfriends.

    12 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 24, 2011

    A Treat from Start to Finish

    The Last Blind Date is a joy to read, full of laugh-out-loud observations about human relationships and the reassuring truth that true love does get you through just about anything. Full of warmth, wonderful writing and wit, reading The Last Blind Date feels like a great girls night out date with your wisest, funniest (and most literary) girlfriend.

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 10, 2011

    Highly Recommended - A MUST Read!

    But 5 minutes ago I finished reading "The Last Blind Date." The book is funny, poignant and so relatable. It made me fall in love with Linda, Randy and New York. Yellin really has a gift. Her writing makes you feel as if she is your very best, very well-spoken, friend conversing with you about her life. I cannot wait to read the prequel, "Such A Lovely Couple" (I feel like my experience is slightly Star Wars-esque - though much more pleasant). "The Last Blind Date" is a page turner, a tear-jerker and an all together charming journey.

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 3, 2011

    I CAN'T IMAGINE ANYONE NOT LIKING THIS BOOK...

    read this ONLY IF YOU LIKE TO LAUGH, BE ENTERTAINED AND FEEL GOOD!!!

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 9, 2011

    Highly RecommendedI

    I really enjoyed this book. It's a fun, quick read and literally a page-turner since I kept waiting to see what crazy thing would happen next. This modern day memoir is not only a love story between a woman & a man, but a love letter to New York City. Yellin writes with a sense of humor that is both smart and strong. And the heartfelt ending gave me goose bumps - and that's a good thing! I can't wait to read her first book, "Such A Lovely Couple."

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 7, 2011

    Live To Read

    The reader will learn about Linda's life to an almost embarrassingly honest degree. Linda provides some background information for the reader: who she married, why she divorced, what she did with her free time, and her regrets. She manages to recount her experiences to the reader without making everything sound depressing. Readers don't always like depressing, especially for long chapters-no need to worry with this book.




    Linda attempts to date some other men that she is set up with, the vast majority are misses...then she meets Randy. Randy is the other side of Linda, he's funny and caring with his own quirks. She decides Randy might do. The rest of the memoir continues with Linda recounting how their relationship slowly developed with all the (un)usual bumps along the way. From expensive dinner parties to arguments over small expenses, Linda will have the reader laughing all the way. This memoir is terrific for young adults/adults.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 8, 2011

    Great read!

    Most of the book is just flat-out hysterical, but when she gets to the chapter about looking at assisted living places for her in-laws and writes about her own fears of outliving her husband and growing old alone without having had her own children, I wanted to call up the author and say, 'It's all right, I'll be happy to visit you."

    It would be a blast to sit there and listen to her stories.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 7, 2011

    I wanted to stay and read it!

    Heartwarming, Hilarious! I absolutely loved it!

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 18, 2011

    Great dialogue. Infectious humor.

    I loved spending time with Linda Yellin and her husband Randy. Their banter is like the best of the old Nick and Nora Thin Man movies or Bruce Willis going back and forth with Cybil Shephard in Moonlighting. (I realize these are old examples - but that demonstrates how rare and special it is to read about people who are clever and charming enough to make you want to eavesdrop on all their conversations.) This is a fun, fun memoir by a writer I am happy to discover.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2011

    Simply the Best!

    My girlfriend recommended this book to me. She's pretty critical of many things she reads and rarely gets excited so I knew this book must be special. It's more than special. It's a hope-filled, very funny love story. The kind that will get passed from girlfriend to girlfriend. Although my husband asked me what was making me laugh so much and now he is reading the book (and laughing) too.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 18, 2011

    Fun, Hopeful Love Story

    It's not often that I finish reading a book by an author and immediately hurry to find anything else she's written. This memoir is great fun and a great love story. Plus it is filled with hope for finding the right person. I was surprised - and pleased - to discover an earlier novel by Yellin. Surprised that I'd never heard of her before, and pleased that I could read more of her writing. The first book, Such A Lovely Couple, is only available as an e-book. Glad I own a Nook.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 2, 2011

    I love her world and how she wraps it around the reader

    There are those writers who invite you into their thoughts. Dorothy Parker was like that, but Linda wraps you in a warm blanket of love and laughter once you arrive. Her writing is the humor of the soul and each part touches the reader with its wonder and joy. I have a new favorite author and can't wait for her next book!

    Move over Tena Fey.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 27, 2011

    Highly Recommended

    Yellin writes with tremendous heart, wit and tenderness. Although her first book (a novel, but from references in her memoir, I suspect much of the novel's story is true) is often bittersweet, both books are humor-filled and written with a warmth and a personal feel. If you can, you might want to read Such A Lovely Couple first (and you will want to read both) - because after the sad events that take place in it, you will share the author's joy at the turn her life takes in the second book.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 2, 2011

    A big happy read.

    This up-tempo memoir is a gift. With nuanced humor and playful insights, Linda Yellin's transition from Chicago to New York as an older bride, her relationship with her new husband and his children, and her quest to feel at home in New York kept me smiling throughout her journey. This is a big happy book and a magical - yet real - love story.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 24, 2011

    Insightful Humor - start laughing on page one

    It's impossible not to care about the author as she struggles through a foreign culture that just happens to be New York. I really felt for her trying to make women friends later in life and to keep charging forward after her first dismal job. But ultimately this is a love story - albeit a keeps-you-smiling very funny one - between Linda and the husband who finally shows up in her life and the new city that becomes her home.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 23, 2011

    Laughed so hard I startled myself!

    This memoir is charming and so hilarious. My favorite parts were when the author's husband tries to explain New York children interviewing to get into private schools and the dinner party with all the New Yorkers name-dropping the fancy east coast colleges they attended. She hides in the bathroom rather than admit attending college in Illinois surrounded by cows and soybeans. Hysterical! I find her writing to be really authentic and I looooved this book!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 18, 2011

    Like a big box of chocolates.

    Feisty, upbeat author takes on New York at that stage in life when most people just want to stay home with a good book.like this one. Incredibly entertaining. Wonderful love story.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 9, 2011

    THIS IS A KEEPER!

    I want to share the news....Here is a woman humorist who puts herself out there and makes me laugh with genuine glee. Her voice is refreshing, her story line intriguing in this modern world of romance, and her sense of humor is spot-on and pure perfection. She writes in the tone of "everywoman", makes me feel comforted about the pursuit of love, and leaves you believing, despite everything you may believe, love is still possible at any age. Here is hope, honesty, and a page turner of rich emotional experiences couched in bundles of recognizable laughs....which always make you think! Pass it on....

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 2, 2011

    You'll Fall In Love With Yellin & The Last Blind Date

    I LOVED this book and couldn't put it down and then, couldn't stop thinking about it. Tina Fey's got nothing on Linda Yellin when it comes to wit and comedic timing. Yellin's voice is pitch perfect! Her memoir will make you laugh from cover to cover. It's honest, hilarious and highly, highly recommended. I can't wait to see what she writes next!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 25, 2011

    A Delightful Read

    Wonderfully engaging, Yellin's "The Last Blind Date" has Ephron's comic timing with a flavor that's uniquely Midwestern. A memoir about a woman who's relentlessly candid about her circumstances, yet does so in a way that makes you want to both root for and laugh with her until the turn of the final page.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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