The Last Housewife

Overview

Born into slavery, George Washington Carver became one of the mostprestigious scientists of his time. This biography follows Dr. Carver's lifefrom childhood to his days as a teacher and discoverer.

Born into slavery, George Washington Carver became one of the mostprestigious scientists of his time. This biography follows Dr. Carver's lifefrom childhood to his days as a teacher and discoverer.

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Overview

Born into slavery, George Washington Carver became one of the mostprestigious scientists of his time. This biography follows Dr. Carver's lifefrom childhood to his days as a teacher and discoverer.

Born into slavery, George Washington Carver became one of the mostprestigious scientists of his time. This biography follows Dr. Carver's lifefrom childhood to his days as a teacher and discoverer.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
A onetime Wall Streeter, Kit Deleeuw is now a station-wagon driver, Labrador walker and principal caregiver to his children. He's also the PI star of Katz's Suburban Detective series (The Family Stalker) and a living lexicon of political correctness. This entry, the third and best, begins when Shelly Bloomfield, one of New Jersey's last professional moms, is accused of shooting the new-and feminist-junior high school principal. Shelly, whose husband's gun was the murder weapon and whose son was on the verge of suspension from the school for sexual harassment incidents involving bra-snapping and groping, hires Kit to exonerate her. Katz writes as though his readers were visiting from Mars as his hero-narrator endlessly details suburban, child-centered life, pats himself on the back for being a caring dad and only occasionally pauses to let the plot inch forward. Yet, while most of the characters whine at being torn between parenting and power-lunching, dark hints of evil lurking in the minds of children surface to give the tale some depth. Ultimately, however, Katz shies away from such possibilities to offer a pat solution that draws on hormones and peer pressure.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A onetime Wall Streeter, Kit Deleeuw is now a station-wagon driver, Labrador walker and principal caregiver to his children. He's also the PI star of Katz's Suburban Detective series (The Family Stalker) and a living lexicon of political correctness. This entry, the third and best, begins when Shelly Bloomfield, one of New Jersey's last professional moms, is accused of shooting the new-and feminist-junior high school principal. Shelly, whose husband's gun was the murder weapon and whose son was on the verge of suspension from the school for sexual harassment incidents involving bra-snapping and groping, hires Kit to exonerate her. Katz writes as though his readers were visiting from Mars as his hero-narrator endlessly details suburban, child-centered life, pats himself on the back for being a caring dad and only occasionally pauses to let the plot inch forward. Yet, while most of the characters whine at being torn between parenting and power-lunching, dark hints of evil lurking in the minds of children surface to give the tale some depth. Ultimately, however, Katz shies away from such possibilities to offer a pat solution that draws on hormones and peer pressure. Major ad/promo; author tour. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Formerly executive producer of CBS and now media critic for New York, Katz also writes witty little mysteries aimed at the heart of suburban America (Death by Stationwagon, Doubleday, 1993). Here, the self-styled "last housewife" in one typical town is accused of slaughtering the middle school's feminist principal.
Emily Melton
Unemployed after being tainted by a Wall Street scandal, sensitive guy Kit Deleeuw decides to stay home with the kiddies. While playing Mr. Mom, Kit applies for his private investigator's license and then puts it to good use when neighbor Shelly Bloomfield, accused of murdering local school principal and ardent feminist Nancy Rainier-Gault, asks Kit to prove her innocence. It seems that Shelly's learning-disabled son, Jason, was about to be expelled from school for snapping girls' bra straps. Kit wonders briefly whether Shelly might be the killer but, like the sensitized guy he is, decides to apply the old maxim of innocent until proved guilty. Katz's television background shows in the slick writing and facile dialogue; unfortunately, the story is rife with suburban yuppie cliches and hyperpolitical correctness. Still, this is the third installment of Katz's Suburban Detective series, and the premise seems to be popular. Recommended for libraries, probably in suburbia, where the earlier titles found an audience.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780613070096
  • Publisher: San Val, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/28/2002
  • Product dimensions: 5.32 (w) x 7.71 (h) x 0.49 (d)

Table of Contents

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