The Last of the Medicine Men

The Last of the Medicine Men

by Benedict Allen, Dorling Kindersley Publishing Staff
     
 

In The Last of the Medicine Men, author Benedict Allen, explores the mysterious and dramatic world of healers, who are popularly referred to as witchdoctors. In the diverse communities of the world, healing roles are assumed by faithhealers, shamans, psychotherapists, priests, performers, and even poets. Specifically, The Last of the Medicine Men examines the form and… See more details below

Overview

In The Last of the Medicine Men, author Benedict Allen, explores the mysterious and dramatic world of healers, who are popularly referred to as witchdoctors. In the diverse communities of the world, healing roles are assumed by faithhealers, shamans, psychotherapists, priests, performers, and even poets. Specifically, The Last of the Medicine Men examines the form and function these enigmatic characters take in four different cultures -- the provincial towns of Haiti and the Dominican Republic, the jungles of Siberut Island, the wastes of Siberia, and the arid mountains of Mexico. The author investigates roles of medicine men by observing their customs -- even taking part in these rituals himself -- unveiling the varied, complex, and colorful spirits of Shamanism and suggesting what we in the Western world can learn from them.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
In this companion to the BBC television series, four different cultures are examined through observations of customs and rituals. Allen is a marvelous explorer and raconteur whose mission to find the healers of Haiti, Indonesia's Siberut Island, Siberia, and the mountains of Mexico is filled with the mystery and intrigue of the spirit world. His unique voice discloses incredible data, creating an open window into everyday life and faith. Haiti feels like the home of voodoo, where people have felt threatened by man and nature. The cruelty of the physical world is evident. Shamanism has become the official religion in Siberia, where medicine men also serve in the role of priest. The barren Sierra Madre Mountains of Mexico are home to the Huichols, who grow maize and worship sun gods. The direct connection between faith and agricultural success is emphasized in these little communities. Siberut Island forests provide medicines for every want imaginable, and the people take comfort in knowing that their needs are filled in this isolated environment. The remarkable powers that Allen has witnessed come alive for the reader in his text, and fabulous photographs document his experiences. This lengthy reference source is appropriate for middle schoolers as well as high school and college level researchers. Although tribal vocabulary words are italicized throughout the text, a glossary is not included. Index. Photos. Maps. Biblio. VOYA CODES: 4Q 3P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2000, DK, 240p, $30. Ages 11 to 18.Reviewer: Nancy Zachary

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789471840
Publisher:
DK Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2000
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
9.46(w) x 6.42(h) x 1.15(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >