The Last Self-Help Book You'll Ever Need: Repress Your Anger, Think Negatively,Be A Good Blamer, and Throttle Your Inner Child

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Overview

"You can’t love someone until you learn to love yourself.” "Being healthy means being in touch with your feelings.” "Never lose hope." These are self-evident truths, right?Wrong charges best-selling psychologist Paul Pearsall in this provocative new book. Though everyone from talk show hosts to politicians mouths these platitudes, and self-help bibles are a dime a dozen, their advice simply hasn’t helped us live happier or more satisfying lives. Pearsall cites scientific evidence to challenge what he calls the ...

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Overview

"You can’t love someone until you learn to love yourself.” "Being healthy means being in touch with your feelings.” "Never lose hope." These are self-evident truths, right?Wrong charges best-selling psychologist Paul Pearsall in this provocative new book. Though everyone from talk show hosts to politicians mouths these platitudes, and self-help bibles are a dime a dozen, their advice simply hasn’t helped us live happier or more satisfying lives. Pearsall cites scientific evidence to challenge what he calls the McMorals of self-potentialism: the unsubstantiated prescriptions, programs, guarantees, and gurus that define our pursuit of The Good Life.His message is timely: we’re fed up with truisms masquerading as truth, and hungry for self-help that really helps. Filled with groundbreaking research and inspiring true stories from Dr. Pearsall’s clinical practice, The Last Self-Help Book You’ll Ever Need offers a powerful antidote to the mindless mental languishing that characterizes so much of modern life.The solution is not just to "get tough and suck it up.” Instead, Pearsall offers powerful if counterintuitive strategies. By abandoning the mandate to "stay hopeful,” for example, we can begin to savor today rather than focus desperately on tomorrow. By allowing ourselves the natural process of grieving instead of relentlessly treating grief as a disease, we can recover from tragedy.With Pearsall’s lively and informative roadmap to psychological health, we can say "goodbye” to our inner child and "hello” to a better life.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Kudos to Pearsall (The Pleasure Prescription) for arguing against the "platitudes of self-empowerment" that dominate the self-help bookshelves. Their relentlessly upbeat tone and unrealistic idea of happiness will only make you feel worse, he says. Using research studies to bolster his points, Pearsall takes on the "McMorals, tenets about life that go down easily but aren't good for our long-term well being," as well as popular practitioners, such as Dr. Phil. Pearsall, an adjunct clinical professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, wants readers to stop being so self-centered. It's more important, he says, to love others before oneself, and appropriate guilt and anxiety are essential to learning to live a better life. "Stop expressing yourself," he says. "Shut up and listen." And don't avoid blaming: "Finding the right person to blame is essential for mental health." He explains cogently why such statements make more sense than the usual self-help shibboleths. Sometimes, particularly in chapters that tackle diet and aging, Pearsall sounds preachy and falls into the self-help trap of making generalizations without backup. But this contrarian volume gives readers plenty to consider and offers a hopeful and helpful approach to being mindful and fully engaged in each moment-good or bad. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Drawing on current psychological research and insights gleaned from his fight with stage IV lymphoma, best-selling neuropsychologist Pearsall (The Pleasure Prescription) argues that the self-help industry has perpetuated a number of myth that actually prevent people from prospering. Among his conclusions are that low self-esteem is not a serious, widespread affliction, that addiction is usually a lifestyle choice rather than a debilitating compulsion, and that we would be better off concentrating on how to love others instead of how to love ourselves-all delivered in a satirical voice. Unfortunately, in his zeal to negate self-help tenets he considers counterproductive, Pearsall overshadows his own sensible advice of "mindful" living and savoring our less-than-perfect lives; he may also inadvertently encourage some readers to continue practicing harmful behaviors. Order on demand only.-Crystal Renfro, Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780465054862
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 5/9/2005
  • Pages: 243
  • Product dimensions: 6.36 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Pearsall, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized neuropsychologist, and is an adjunct clinical professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He is also a popular writer and speaker, and has appeared on national television and radio programs. His previous books include The Beethoven Factor and the best-selling The Pleasure Prescription. He lives in Honolulu, Hawaii.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 1, 2012

    Excellent.

    Excellent.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2014

    Nnaasm

    X ddd

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2006

    Refreshing antidote to too much positive thinking

    Fat? Unhappy? Looking for love? With 20,000 plus self-help titles on the shelves, people are still overweight, suicidal and unfulfilled. Neuropsychologist Paul Pearsall debunks the promises of the self-help genre. He exhorts you to treat it skeptically, being mindfully aware of whether its counsel fits your life. This is probably not the 'last self-help book you¿ll ever need ' it¿s certainly not the last self-help book Dr. Pearsall is likely to write (and he writes well, so that¿s fine). However, it will make you think and help you gain perspective on 'self-helpism.' Quit obsessing about the future and what you don¿t have. Seize the moment. A life well-lived must, in fact, be authentically lived, not just contemplated. We advocate Pearsall¿s contrary point of view as the antidote to way too much positive thinking.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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