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The Last Self-Help Book You'll Ever Need: Repress Your Anger, Think Negatively, Be a Good Blamer, and Throttle Your Inner Child
     

The Last Self-Help Book You'll Ever Need: Repress Your Anger, Think Negatively, Be a Good Blamer, and Throttle Your Inner Child

2.7 3
by Paul Pearsall
 

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Although the tenets of self-help have been attacked before, Pearsall is the first psychologist to expose these deeply entrenched ideas to scientific scrutiny. And unlike other debunking books, The Last Self-Help Book You'll Ever Need goes beyond skepticism to propose a set of life-affirming (and refreshingly contrarian) axioms that can help anyone lead

Overview

Although the tenets of self-help have been attacked before, Pearsall is the first psychologist to expose these deeply entrenched ideas to scientific scrutiny. And unlike other debunking books, The Last Self-Help Book You'll Ever Need goes beyond skepticism to propose a set of life-affirming (and refreshingly contrarian) axioms that can help anyone lead the Good Life.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Kudos to Pearsall (The Pleasure Prescription) for arguing against the "platitudes of self-empowerment" that dominate the self-help bookshelves. Their relentlessly upbeat tone and unrealistic idea of happiness will only make you feel worse, he says. Using research studies to bolster his points, Pearsall takes on the "McMorals, tenets about life that go down easily but aren't good for our long-term well being," as well as popular practitioners, such as Dr. Phil. Pearsall, an adjunct clinical professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, wants readers to stop being so self-centered. It's more important, he says, to love others before oneself, and appropriate guilt and anxiety are essential to learning to live a better life. "Stop expressing yourself," he says. "Shut up and listen." And don't avoid blaming: "Finding the right person to blame is essential for mental health." He explains cogently why such statements make more sense than the usual self-help shibboleths. Sometimes, particularly in chapters that tackle diet and aging, Pearsall sounds preachy and falls into the self-help trap of making generalizations without backup. But this contrarian volume gives readers plenty to consider and offers a hopeful and helpful approach to being mindful and fully engaged in each moment-good or bad. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Drawing on current psychological research and insights gleaned from his fight with stage IV lymphoma, best-selling neuropsychologist Pearsall (The Pleasure Prescription) argues that the self-help industry has perpetuated a number of myth that actually prevent people from prospering. Among his conclusions are that low self-esteem is not a serious, widespread affliction, that addiction is usually a lifestyle choice rather than a debilitating compulsion, and that we would be better off concentrating on how to love others instead of how to love ourselves-all delivered in a satirical voice. Unfortunately, in his zeal to negate self-help tenets he considers counterproductive, Pearsall overshadows his own sensible advice of "mindful" living and savoring our less-than-perfect lives; he may also inadvertently encourage some readers to continue practicing harmful behaviors. Order on demand only.-Crystal Renfro, Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465054879
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
01/28/2007
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
572,797
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 1.00(h) x 10.00(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Paul Pearsall, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized neuropsychologist, and is an adjunct clinical professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He is also a popular writer and speaker, and has appeared on national television and radio programs. His previous books include The Beethoven Factor and the best-selling The Pleasure Prescription. He lives in Honolulu, Hawaii.

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The Last Self-Help Book You'll Ever Need: Repress Your Anger, Think Negatively, Be a Good Blamer, and Throttle Your Inner Child 2.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
X ddd
nuuknuuk More than 1 year ago
Excellent.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago