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The Laws
     

The Laws

4.0 2
by Plato
 

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Plato's Republic represents his great unattainable ideal: a model society governed by Guardians trained in moral philosophy. But in the real world - where philosopher-kings are in short supply - Plato knew that the only foundation for stable and just society is the rule of law. In this, his last and longest dialogue, therefore, he sets out in fascinating

Overview

Plato's Republic represents his great unattainable ideal: a model society governed by Guardians trained in moral philosophy. But in the real world - where philosopher-kings are in short supply - Plato knew that the only foundation for stable and just society is the rule of law. In this, his last and longest dialogue, therefore, he sets out in fascinating detail a comprehensive system of legislation to cover every aspect of his life - from sexual conduct to sport, from drinking parties (as a means of education) to divorce. His extraordinary achievement is put into context by Professor Saunders's fine Introduction, which looks at Plato's whole career against its historical background and shows that if modern critics have rightly found some totalitarian tendencies in Plato, he is still a uniquely stimulating and provocative writer.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781605018928
Publisher:
MobileReference
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Series:
Mobi Classics
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
371 KB

Meet the Author

PLATO was born about 427 B.C.E. into the distinguished Athenian family of Ariston and Perictione. Although interested in politics as a young man, he became disenchanted with the cruel and immoral behavior of Athenian rulers. Some small ray of hope emerged when Athens deposed its dictators and established a democracy; however, when the citizens put the philosopher Socrates on trial and later executed him for impiety, Plato left Athens to travel abroad.

In 387 B.C.E., Plato finally returned to Athens and created the Academy, an intellectual center for philosophy and science that offered scholarly training in such fields as astronomy, biological sciences, mathematics, and political science. From this influen­tial institution emerged Aristotle, Plato's most famous student. Plato dedicated himself to the Academy until his death in about 347 B.C.E.

During his lifetime Plato wrote a number of supremely important dialogues, which presented and critically analyzed significant philosophical ideas in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and social and political philosophy—all of which con­tinue to engage posterity. His better-known dialogues include: The Apology, Cratylus, Crito, Euthyphro, Gorgias, The Laws, Meno, Parmenides, Phaedo, Phaedrus, Protagoras, The Repub­lic, The Sophist, The Symposium, Theaetetus, and Timaeus.

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The Laws 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago