The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

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Overview

With his beloved Gothic tales, Washington Irving is said to have created the genre of the short story in America. Though Irving crafted many of the most memorable characters in fiction, from Rip Van Winkle to Ichabod Crane, his gifts were not confined to the short story alone. He was also a master of satire, essay, travelogue, and folktale, as evidenced in this classic collection.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow said, "Every reader has a first ...
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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

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Overview

With his beloved Gothic tales, Washington Irving is said to have created the genre of the short story in America. Though Irving crafted many of the most memorable characters in fiction, from Rip Van Winkle to Ichabod Crane, his gifts were not confined to the short story alone. He was also a master of satire, essay, travelogue, and folktale, as evidenced in this classic collection.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow said, "Every reader has a first book.... which, in early youth, first fascinates his imagination, and at once excites and satisfies the desires of his mind. To me, this first book was The Sketch Book of Washington Irving... The charm of The Sketch Book remains unbroken; the old fascination still lingers about it."

Illustrations by Arthur Rackham accompany this retelling of Irving's classic tale of a headless horseman.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Will Moses, the great-grandson of Grandma Moses, has illustrated this American classic with a liveliness that its creator might have appreciated. This conjuring tale is a Halloween must.
Rosemary Marotta
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW Washington Irving, illus. by Michael Garland. Boyds Mills, $8.95 ISBN 1-56397-605-6. Full-page oil paintings illustrate this unabridged edition of the classic spine-tingler. All ages. (Sept.)
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
"Paintings by Grandma Moses's great-grandson make a striking match for the classic story," said PW. Ages 5-up. (Aug.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Even before this spooky tale begins, the illustration on the cover of this book will send a shiver down the spine of most readers. This is the tale of an obnoxious school teacher, Ichabod Crane, and his attempts to win the hand of Katrina, the beautiful daughter of a rich, local farmer. Katrina is already being courted by the handsome and fearless Brom Bones who is famous for his tricks and practical jokes. Ichabod's greed and foolishness eventually lead him on a very long and eventful ride home from a party one night in the company of the headless horseman. Will Moses is the great-grandson of Grandma Moses, the painter famous for her primitive, folk art style and it shows. He has inherited both her style and talent, which are entirely appropriate for this deliciously scary retelling of Washington Irving's 1820 story.
Children's Literature - Elizabeth Bagg
This is an excellent rendition of the famous ghost story about the hapless schoolteacher and the headless horseman. Washington Irvings's lengthy descriptions and erudite vocabulary have been condensed to a comfortable reading level for upper elementary or middle school readers. The realistic and colorful illustrations really suit the mood of the tale. 1995 (orig.\
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Kelley makes a significant contribution to picture books for young adults with his skillful rendition of Irving's classic The Legend of Sleepy Hallow. Kelley drew his inspiration from the painters of the late 18th century. He uses style, color and light to reflect the tones of the Flemish masters and revive the Hudson Valley life of the early Dutch settlers. Green predominates, giving a woodsy feel while creating a strong sense of setting and time. Kelley also adopts the illustrative vision of the 1700's where he depicts a horse galloping with front and back legs extended, as they were in the period (artists didn't have photography to show them that a horse doesn't gallop that way). All these things add to the feeling of the period.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-- An unabridged version of the classic tale of Ichabod Crane, his affection for the wealthy and beautiful Katrina Van Tassel, and his confrontation with the Headless Horseman. Despite Irving's outmoded narrative style, this is still an excellent ghost story that combines appropriate amounts of humor and terror while integrating Germanic legend with New England folklore, specifically that of New York State. Garland's realistic oil paintings are either portraitures or landscapes. The former are reminiscent of Barry Moser's work, while the latter resemble those by Thomas Locker. While these illustrations act as a sophisticated balance to Irving's wordy narrative, they do not consistently evoke the mood of Arthur Rackham's interpretation (1990). In her retelling for younger children (1987, both Morrow), Diane Wolkstein avoids the African-American stereotypes that Irving used for ``comic relief'' and concentrates on telling a good story, eliminating the complicated and archaic language of the period. All in all, this new version is useful where additional copies of the unabridged edition are needed. --Andrew W. Hunter, Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg, Charlotte, NC
School Library Journal

Gr 5 Up- Grimly's interpretation of Irving's classic features quirky, creepy artwork that is strange in all the right ways. Calling to mind R. Crumb's crosshatched, wild-eyed, weirdly proportioned characters, Grimly's Ichabod Crane and the other townspeople are (predictably) grim caricatures. To cast the town in a perpetual twilight, the artist relies on a muted palette of grays, browns, tans, and oranges, which provides ample range and visual variety. The art and the text are not exactly symbiotic; Irving's prose, even with a few modifications, is simply too dense for modern readers. Youngsters may find themselves reading the text and examining the art separately, rather than absorbing both at the same time. More heavily graphic than an illustrated story, but still not quite a graphic novel, and equally at home in juvenile or young adult sections, this inventive but faithful adaptation deserves shelf space in most libraries.-Catherine Threadgill, Charleston County Public Library, SC

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Booknews
The unabridged text of Washington Irving's classic folktale is illustrated by Gary Kelley's evocative color chalk drawings and b&w gravestone rubbings. 8x13". Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Carolyn Phelan
Many folk-art paintings illustrate this simplified retelling of Washington Irving's "Legend of Sleepy Hollow". Varied in size from small vignettes to double-page spreads, the colorful paintings are reminiscent of the works of Moses' great-grandmother, better known as Grandma Moses. A large-format picture book that will fill a need in some libraries.
Kirkus Reviews
Abridged but not rewritten, the classic tale is decorated with a plethora of very small, comically gothic cartoons that add an air of spooky grotesquerie. An overall color scheme of pale browns and oranges adds a properly autumnal air to Sleepy Hollow's knobby woodlands, and the supporting cast includes nearly as many ghosts, toothy imps and the like as it does human figures. Grimly's not much for verisimilitude-party guests at the Van Tassels include African-Americans, and there's a glimpse of a generic Native American earlier on-but burly "rantipole hero" Brom Bones looks rightly massive next to the exaggeratedly gawky figure of Ichabod Crane. The Headless Horseman not only sports a particularly eerie-looking twig between its shoulders but rides a red-eyed, demonic steed, and in three views on the final page the decayed schoolhouse has a decidedly haunted air. Still, this is not a particularly scary rendition, and because its text is chopped into scattered, easily digestible passages tucked between or inside the panels, it may have more appeal to less-able readers than full versions. (Fantasy. 10-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781480020689
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/1/2012
  • Pages: 46
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Washington Irving is considered by many to be the father of American literature. He died in 1859.

Michael Garland has made an indelible mark on the world of children's literature. His rich,colorful artwork captures the flavor of Washington Irving's classic The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, Elizabeth Friedrich's Leah's Pony, Corinne Demas Bliss's Electra and the Charlotte Russe, and Ann Tompert's Saint Patrick and Saint Nicholas.

Mr. Garland wrote and illustrated Angel Cat, Dinner at Magritte's, Circus Girl, and My Cousin Katie, which was named an ALA Booklist Editors' Choice and a NCSS-CBC Notable Childrens Trade Book in the field of social studies. One of his paintings from The Legend of Sleepy Hollow was included in the 1992 Society of Illustrators' Annual Show, and the entire book was selected for the organization's "Original Art of Children's Books" exhibit also in 1992.

Mr. Garland was awarded Certificates of Merit in the Society of Illustrators' Annual Shows from 1981-1988 and in 1990-1992. A native New Yorker, Michael Garland earned a bachelor of fine arts degree from the Pratt Institute in 1974. An avid landscape painter in his leisure time, Mr. Garland lives with his wife and three children in Patterson, New York, not far from the scene of Washington Irving's great American folktale.

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Read an Excerpt

The Author's Account of Himself

I am of this mind with Homer, that as the snaile that crept out of her shel was turned eftsoones into a Toad, and thereby was forced to make a stoole to sit on; so the traveller that stragleth from his owne country is in a short time transformed into so monstrous a shape that he is faine to alter his mansion with his manners and to live where he can, not where he would.

I was always fond of visiting new scenes and observing strange characters and manners. Even when a mere child I began my travels and made many tours of discovery into foreign parts and unknown regions of my native city; to the frequent alarm of my parents and the emolument of the town cryer. As I grew into boyhood I extended the range of my observations. My holy day afternoons were spent in rambles about the surrounding country. I made myself familiar with all its places famous in history or fable. I knew every spot where a murder or robbery had been committed or a ghost seen. I visited the neighbouring villages and added greatly to my stock of knowledge, by noting their habits and customs, and conversing with their sages and great men. I even journeyed one long summer's day to the summit of the most distant hill, from whence I stretched my eye over many a mile of terra incognita, and was astonished to find how vast a globe I inhabited.

This rambling propensity strengthened with my years. Books of voyages and travels became my passion, and in devouring their contents I neglected the regular exercises of the school. How wistfully would I wander about the pier heads in fine weather, and watch the parting ships, bound to distant climes. With what longing eyes would Igaze after their lessening sails, and waft myself in imagination to the ends of the earth.

Further reading and thinking, though they brought this vague inclination into more reasonable bounds, only served to make it more decided. I visited various parts of my own country, and had I been merely a lover of fine scenery, I should have felt little desire to seek elsewhere its gratification, for on no country have the charms of nature been more prodigally lavished. Her mighty lakes, like oceans of liquid silver; her mountains with their bright aerial tints; her valleys teeming with wild fertility; her tremendous cataracts thundering in their solitudes; her boundless plains waving with spontaneous verdure; her broad deep rivers, rolling in solemn silence to the ocean; her trackless forests, where vegetation puts forth all its magnificence; her skies kindling with the magic of summer clouds and glorious sunshine-no, never need an American look beyond his own country for the sublime and beautiful of natural scenery.

But Europe held forth the charms of storied and poetical association. There were to be seen the masterpieces of art, the refinements of highly cultivated society, the quaint peculiarities of ancient and local custom. My native country was full of youthful promise; Europe was rich in the accumulated treasures of age. Her very ruins told the history of times gone by, and every mouldering stone was a chronicle. I longed to wander over the scenes of renowned achievement-to tread as it were in the footsteps of antiquity-to loiter about the ruined castle-to meditate on the falling tower-to escape in short, from the commonplace realities of the present, and lose myself among the shadowy grandeurs of the past.
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Table of Contents

Biographical Note
Introduction
Preface to the Revised Edition
The Author's Account of Himself 3
The Voyage 6
Roscoe 12
The Wife 18
Rip Van Winkle 25
English Writers on America 42
Rural Life in England 50
The Broken Heart 57
The Art of Book Making 62
A Royal Poet 68
The Country Church 81
The Widow and Her Son 86
A Sunday in London 93
The Boar's Head Tavern, East Cheap 96
The Mutability of Literature 106
Rural Funerals 116
The Inn Kitchen 127
The Spectre Bridegroom 129
Westminster Abbey 143
Christmas 158
The Stage Coach 163
Christmas Eve 169
Christmas Day 180
The Christmas Dinner 192
London Antiques 205
Little Britain 211
Stratford-on-Avon 224
Traits of Indian Character 242
Philip of Pokanoket 252
John Bull 267
The Pride of the Village 277
The Angler 285
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow 293
L'Envoy 321
App Sleepy Hollow 325
Notes 337
Reading Group Guide 357
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Reading Group Guide

1. Why does Iriving call this collection The Sketch Book? What effect is he trying to achieve with the preponderance of visual imagery?

2. How do the stories in The Sketch Book inform one another and function one another and function as a collection? How do the stories set in America--"The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle"--distinguish themselves from Geoffrey Crayon's vignettes about his travels in England?

3. Alice Hoffman says in her Introduction that Irving is thought to have created the short-story genre in America. What constitutes a short story, and what are the hallmarks of the American short story? How does it break with its European predecessors yet still work within tradition?

4. Why do you think Washington Irving uses the writing and narration of the fictional Diedrich Knickerbocker (the pen name he used in writing his famous spoof A History of New York) to bookmark "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"? What effect does this have on the story itself? does it lend credulity or only make it more fantastic?

5. The poem that Irving quotes at the outset of "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"--"The Castle of Indolence" by James Thomson--recounts the story of an enchanter who deprives all who enter his castle of their free will and their resolve. Why do you think Irving chose this particular poem? How does it inform your reading of the story?

6. How is this story influenced by the gothic literary tradition that preceded it, and how--in its setting, mood, plot, and message--does it embrace the gothic itself?

7. How has the village of Sleepy Hollow been affected or,conversely, unaffected by the American Revolution? In what context does the narrator refer to it?

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Customer Reviews

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    Then why did you kiss me? Why did you act as if you have even infinitesimal affection for me? Why toy with my heart like a cup? You use me once, then shatter me. Ahem, hem. I'm practicing Shakespeare. :D

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    *he sings Breath Into Me by RED.* If this is how it feels when I...ignore the words you spoke to me. If this is where I lose myself when I keep riding away from you... If this is who I am when, when I don't know myself anymore. If this is what I choose when...it's all left up to me.<br>*he hums the chorus.*<br>And this is how it looks when, I am standing on the edge... If this how I break apart, when...I...finally hit the ground. And this is how it hurts when I, pretend I don't feel any pain, and this is how I disapper, when I throw myself awaaaaay.

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    Cole

    *Flashes of images went through his head. Visions. Lives. Thruths. He looked at the dead man on the ground. He saw a photo laying beside him. He picked it up. He stared at it in shock. It was a picture of a wedding. Him, marrying Trish, with Zeke as his best man. The thing he had never gotten to do. His felt his brain overload as the pieces went into place. He couldn't accept it. Kessler was him. The future version of him. He groaned and he became unconcious. Falling onto the ground*

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