The Lemonade Cookbook: Southern California Comfort Food from L.A.'s Favorite Modern Cafeteria

The Lemonade Cookbook: Southern California Comfort Food from L.A.'s Favorite Modern Cafeteria

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by Alan Jackson, JoAnn Cianciulli
     
 

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The Lemonade Cookbook takes the bold flavors, imaginative dishes, and southern California lifestyle that have made the brand an instant hit and captures them in a fresh, beautifully-designed, full-color book. Like Los Angeles, Lemonade's cuisine is carefully blended with variety. L.A. is agents and movie grips, surfers and yoga moms, students and celebrities

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Overview

The Lemonade Cookbook takes the bold flavors, imaginative dishes, and southern California lifestyle that have made the brand an instant hit and captures them in a fresh, beautifully-designed, full-color book. Like Los Angeles, Lemonade's cuisine is carefully blended with variety. L.A. is agents and movie grips, surfers and yoga moms, students and celebrities, and a wide mix of different culinary traditions. At Lemonade the marketplace salads, unique sandwiches, and slow-simmered stews taste as though every culture stirred a bit into the pot—for example, the skirt steak with grilled onions and piquillo peppers with its smoky depth, pairs perfectly with the snappy salad of Chinese long beans, plums, and scallion vinaigrette.

A comfortable place where locals and visitors enjoy a rotating daily spread of deliciousness, the recipes, more than 120 in all, stress simple cooking preparation with a global taste, and are a perfect fit for today's on-the-go lifestyles and perceptive palates. And, of course, it wouldn't be L.A. without the amazing desserts—from banana mascarpone layer cake to caramel fleur de sel macaroons to peanut butter milk chocolate cookies, there are recipes for treats galore, plus ten different recipes for delicious flavors of lemonade. The Lemonade Cookbook: Southern California Comfort Food from L.A.'s Favorite Modern Cafeteria speaks to all cooks who want to make sophisticated highly-urban "comfort food" with ease.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
10/21/2013
Alan Jackson, the man behind the successful Los Angeles-based food chain Lemonade café, shares his take on SoCal comfort foods in this bright and cheerful collection. With recipes like these, it is easy to understand why his cafe is so popular among locals: corn chowder, beef stroganoff, mac and cheese, chicken chili, and basic chocolate chip cookies are never-fail classics, and the lion's share of the cuisine. Jackson also offers inventive riffs like roasted parsnips with pecorino cheese and a farro and spaghetti squash salad with pomegranate vinaigrette. There are also thoughtful applications for leftover buttermilk baked chicken, beef short ribs, and chicken basque—three dishes that require more preparation but are surely worth the effort. Virtually all of his recipes are well thought-out and clearly explained; novices as well as pros will find something that's worth a try. Fans of Ina Garten's simple approach to tasty food will savor this attractive and accessible collection. (Nov.)
From the Publisher

“Lemonade. Just the word conjures up sunshine, picnics, memories of childhood, and the wonderfully simple things in life.” —The Beach Reporter

“With a menu featuring ingredients such as champagne vinaigrette, black kale, lemongrass, and saffron creme fraiche, you will be wishing there were four meals a day.” —Everything L.A. blog

“Grab a tray and choose from an array of salads...or try one of the pot roasts simmering in colorful cast-iron cookware. Wash it down with ginger peach lemonade.” —The New York Times Travel Section

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781466838666
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
10/29/2013
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
897,667
File size:
11 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

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The Lemonade Cookbook

Southern California Comfort Food from L.A.'s Favorite Modern Cafeteria


By Alan Jackson, JoAnn Cianciulli, Victoria Pearson

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2013 Alan Jackson and JoAnn Cianciulli
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4668-3866-6



CHAPTER 1

MARKETPLACE VEGETABLES


EATING YOUR VEGETABLES SHOULDN'T FEEL LIKE PUNISHMENT. Lemonade has become famous for the freshness and originality of our menu, showcasing the abundance of seasonal vegetables in a fun and creative way. We do this by using bold flavors and daring colors to make the vegetables "cravable." At the center of every dish is the unadulterated vegetable, be it broccoli, avocado, or cabbage. The goal is to take that key ingredient and elaborate on it, while still keeping the vegetable at the heart of the final dish.

I call these dishes "Marketplace Vegetables" because I don't consider them traditional "salads" by any means. Think about it, when you order a typical salad isn't the lettuce just filler and it's really about the delicious yummy nibbles you inevitably dig for? Think chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, sharp cheeses, and toasted nuts. Here, we showcase those crunchy, chewy, satisfying elements on their own and ditch the greens altogether. With the exception of Arugula, Fig, Blue Cheese, none of our Marketplace Vegetables include greens or lettuce, and even in that recipe, the arugula acts more as the garnish for fruity figs and pungent blue cheese.

The thing to remember is that all of the Marketplace dishes complement one another, some are completely vegetarian, and others have grains and animal protein (see the next two chapters). When served together, these dishes are an enjoyable vegetable medley of varying tastes and textures that impress dinner guests with a meatless meal worth bragging about.


BEET, PICKLED RED ONION, HAZELNUT VINAIGRETTE


MAKES 4 CUPS

There is an ethnic stretch of Eastern-European bakeries and delis on Santa Monica Boulevard in the Fairfax district of L.A. The colorful display of pickled foods they offer is staggering — cabbage, cucumbers, and beets just to name a few. As a kid, my mother, Alana, would often bring home a pungent vinegar-infused Russian vegetable dish, chock-full of beets, onions, and dill, and coated in tangy sour cream. Here, the nutty richness of hazelnuts replaces sour cream to create a modern-casual adaptation.

1 pound red beets (about 3 medium), tops trimmed
1 cup Pickled Red Onion, coarsely chopped (recipe follows)
½ cup blanched hazelnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
¼ cup Hazelnut Vinaigrette (recipe follows)
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper


TOASTING NUTS

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Spread the nuts out in a single layer on a rimmed baking pan. Bake, checking the nuts and shaking the pan every few minutes, until they are fragrant and lightly toasted; this should take anywhere from 8 to 12 minutes, depending on the type of nut. For example, pine nuts toast faster than walnuts.

BRING A LARGE POT OF SALTED WATER TO BOIL. Submerge the beets, cover the pot, reduce the heat to low, and simmer for 25 to 30 minutes. To check for doneness, insert a paring knife into the center of the beets; it should slide in without any resistance.

DRAIN THE BEETS IN A COLANDER and when cool enough to handle, rub the skins off with paper towels or an old dish towel. Set the beets aside in the refrigerator to chill. The beets can easily be prepared in advance, covered, and refrigerated.

WHEN THE BEETS ARE CHILLED, cut them in a small dice and put into a mixing bowl. Warning! You may want to wear rubber gloves and put a piece of wax paper on your cutting board so you don't stain everything red!

TO THE BEETS, ADD THE PICKLED ONIONS, hazelnuts, and vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper; toss thoroughly to combine.


PICKLED RED ONION

This indispensable condiment adds the perfect crunch, tang, and snap to burgers, sandwiches, and tacos.

1 cup Champagne vinegar
1 cup water
¼ cup sugar
1 tablespoon pickling spice
1 large red onion, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced


COMBINE THE VINEGAR, WATER, SUGAR, AND PICKLING SPICE IN A MEDIUM POT. Slowly bring to a simmer over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally to dissolve the sugar. Put the onions in a heatproof container, pour the hot liquid on top, and toss to coat evenly; the onions should be completely submerged in the liquid.

COVER AND COOL TO ROOM TEMPERATURE. The longer the onions steep the better; shoot for at least 2 hours. Chill before serving. The pickled onions keep for months stored covered in the refrigerator. Be sure to keep them completely submerged in the brine.

Makes about 2 cups


HAZELNUT VINAIGRETTE

When making the hazelnut oil for the base of this vinaigrette, it's important to take the time to lightly toast the hazelnuts to bring out their innate nuttiness, and then immediately blend the nuts with the oil while they're still warm. The residual heat provokes the hazelnuts to release their essential oils and infuse the vinaigrette with flavor.


HAZELNUT OIL

¼ cup blanched hazelnuts, toasted
2/3 cup canola oil

VINAIGRETTE

¼ cup sherry vinegar
2 tablespoons honey or agave nectar
1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon orange juice
½ small shallot, minced
1 teaspoon coarse salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2/3 cup hazelnut oil (from above)


TO PREPARE THE HAZELNUT OIL, combine the nuts and oil in a blender. Blend at high speed for about 1 minute or until the nuts are completely broken down and incorporated into the oil. Pour into a jar or container and set aside. As the oil sits, the ground nuts will settle to the bottom.

TO PREPARE THE VINAIGRETTE, in a mixing bowl combine the vinegar, honey, lemon and orange juices, shallot, salt and pepper. Gently blend with a whisk.

ONCE THE BASE INGREDIENTS ARE COMBINED, pour in the hazelnut oil along with all of the ground nut "goop." Lightly whisk until the ingredients just come together; this is not an emulsified vinaigrette. Pour the vinaigrette into a plastic container or jar and shake it up just before you are ready to dress the vegetables. Keep any leftover vinaigrette covered in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Makes 1 cup


BRUSSELS SPROUT, SHAVED PARMESAN, SHERRY VINAIGRETTE


MAKES 4 CUPS

Brussels sprouts are on the top of many peoples' most hated vegetable list because when they're boiled to death and overcooked, the result is a mushy and bitter mess. A different beast entirely, this golden-crusted version has the ability to turn even the most vigilant Brussels sprout–haters around to the other side. Delicate and hearty at the same time, these badass baby cabbages are terrific served either hot or cold. If serving hot for a holiday dinner, skip adding the vinaigrette after roasting, and simply toss with shaved Parmesan and a couple of knobs of butter.

1½ pounds Brussels sprouts, ends trimmed, yellow outer leaves discarded
1 cup Sherry Vinaigrette
Coarse salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup shaved Parmesan cheese (about 2 ounces)


PREHEAT THE OVEN TO 350 DEGREES F. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat.

HALVE THE BRUSSELS SPROUTS LENGTHWISE and add them to the boiling water. Par-cook for 2 minutes until softened slightly. Drain the sprouts in a colander and transfer to a mixing bowl.

While the sprouts are still warm, toss with ¼ cup of the vinaigrette to coat. Because the sprouts are still warm, they really absorb the vinaigrette and soak up the flavor.

TRANSFER THE SPROUTS TO A LARGE BAKING PAN and spread them out into a single layer. Season generously with salt and pepper. Roast the Brussels sprouts for 25 minutes, until slightly charred on the outside and tender on the inside; shake the pan from time to time to brown the sprouts evenly.

Put the sprouts into a bowl and allow to cool to room temperature. The Brussels sprouts can easily be prepared in advance, covered, and refrigerated.

TO THE COOLED ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS, add the remaining ¿ cup of vinaigrette, cheese, and season with salt and pepper.


CAULIFLOWER, GOLDEN RAISIN, ALMOND, CURRY VINAIGRETTE


MAKES 4 CUPS

Cauliflower can be a little bland on its own, but blasting the florets in a hot oven concentrates its natural sweetness and makes the lily-white vegetable transformed to a crisp caramel brown. Tossing the roasted cauliflower with Curry Vinaigrette brightens the charred flavor. This is a universal side that goes especially well with Harissa Chicken, or lamb chops; or for a complete meal, toss with shredded rotisserie chicken from the deli counter.

1 head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
¼ cup olive oil
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup whole almonds, toasted
¼ cup golden raisins
½ cup Curry Vinaigrette (recipe follows)


PREHEAT THE OVEN TO 400 DEGREES F.

PUT THE CAULIFLOWER ON A LARGE BAKING PAN, drizzle with the oil, toss to coat, and spread out in a single layer. Season generously with salt and pepper. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes until tender and slightly charred, shaking the pan from time to time. Put the roasted cauliflower in a mixing bowl; add the almonds and raisins. Toss with the curry vinaigrette to evenly coat. May be served warm, cold, or at room temperature.


CURRY VINAIGRETTE

This dynamite Curry Vinaigrette starts with making a flavorful curry oil, which can also be used for sautéing scallops or frying potatoes. The robust vinaigrette will make more than you need for the roasted cauliflower, which is a good thing. Drizzle on a flaky piece of grilled halibut or use as a dip for toasted pita bread.

1 cup canola oil, plus 2 tablespoons
1 Granny Smith apple, halved lengthwise, cored, and coarsely chopped
1 small onion, coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons turmeric
1 tablespoon curry powder, preferably Madras


VINAIGRETTE

1 tablespoon whole-grain Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon honey or agave nectar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
Juice of ½ lemon
1 tablespoon orange juice
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper


CORING AN APPLE

Cut the apple in half lengthwise, from top to bottom. Simply remove the core with the help of a melon baller or teaspoon, giving it a quick twist around the seeds to scoop them out. Cut off the stem and bud end of the apple with a knife. Then slice the apple as directed in the recipe.

TO PREPARE THE CURRY OIL, put a small pot over medium-low heat and coat with 2 tablespoons of the canola oil. When the oil is hot, add the apple and onion. Cook and stir until soft and fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the turmeric and curry, and cook until the spices begin to darken slightly, about 1 minute, taking care not to allow the spices to burn.

POUR IN THE REMAINING 1 CUP OF OIL and stir everything together. Increase the heat to medium and bring the oil to a boil. Boil for 1 minute, then remove the oil from the heat and allow to cool to room temperature. Strain the oil into a container to discard the pieces of apple and onion. Let the curry powder settle to the bottom of the container. To keep the oil clear, try not to disturb the curry sediment.

TO PREPARE THE VINAIGRETTE, in a mixing bowl combine the mustard, honey, vinegar, lemon, and orange juices. Gently blend with a whisk; season with salt and pepper. Pour in the oil, taking care not to disturb the curry sediment settled at the bottom, and lightly whisk until the ingredients just come together; this is not an emulsified vinaigrette.

POUR THE VINAIGRETTE into a plastic container or jar and shake it up just before you are ready to dress the vegetables. Keep any leftover vinaigrette covered in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Makes 1 cup


BROCCOLI, RICOTTA, CHAMPAGNE VINAIGRETTE


MAKES 4 CUPS

When fresh broccoli is roasted like it is here, the florets char slightly and take on a wonderful, earthy flavor. The Champagne Vinaigrette has an elegant floral sweetness, which elevates a seemingly basic broccoli dish to something out of the ordinary.

2 heads broccoli (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
¼ cup olive oil
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup grated ricotta salata
½ cup Champagne Vinaigrette (recipe follows)


RICOTTA SALATA

Ricotta salata is a hard cheese with a mildly salty, nutty, and milky flavor. Ricotta Salata is typically made from sheep's milk, and has a distinctive, snowy white color, which stands out strikingly against vivid hues like emerald-colored broccoli.


PREHEAT THE OVEN TO 400 DEGREES F.

PUT THE BROCCOLI ON A LARGE BAKING PAN, drizzle with the oil, toss to coat and spread out in a single layer. Season generously with salt and pepper. Roast, shaking the pan from time to time, until tender and slightly charred, 20 to 25 minutes. Transfer the roasted broccoli to a mixing bowl and set aside to cool. The broccoli can easily be prepared in advance, covered, and refrigerated.

TO THE COOLED ROASTED BROCCOLI, add the cheese and vinaigrette; season with salt and pepper. Toss well to combine. Served chilled or at room temperature.


RAW EGG

The FDA suggests caution in consuming raw eggs due to the slight risk of salmonella or other food borne illness. To reduce this risk, I recommend you use only fresh, clean, properly refrigerated, grade A or AA, preferably organic eggs with intact shells, and avoid contact between the yolks or whites and the shell.


CHAMPAGNE VINAIGRETTE

A universal Champagne Vinaigrette should always be on the refrigerator door. Good on just about everything, drizzle on vegetables that are low in acidity, such as avocado, zucchini, kale, and broccoli. The Champagne Vinaigrette has the right amount of acidity and sweetness to complement these vegetables.

1 large egg yolk
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon honey or agave nectar
2 tablespoons Champagne vinegar
½ teaspoon coarse salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
¾ cup canola oil
½ small shallot, minced


IN A BLENDER, combine the egg yolk, mustard, honey, vinegar, salt, and pepper. Blend on medium speed for a few seconds, and then reduce the speed to low. With the motor running, slowly add the oil until emulsified. Pour into a container or jar and mix in the shallot. Keep any leftover vinaigrette covered in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

Makes 1 cup


GREEN TOMATO, SWEET CORN, PEPITA, AND ANCHO CHILI VINAIGRETTE


MAKES 4 CUPS

It may sound odd, but fresh corn is so much better unadulterated and cut straight off the cob! Here, the small sweet kernels are tossed with tart tomatoes, crunchy pepitas, and smoky Ancho Chili Vinaigrette; perfect for a backyard barbecue. For a little more gusto, add grilled shrimp or black beans to make this vegetable dish more substantial or serve as a piccalilli relish to crown succulent crab cakes.

3 ears fresh corn, shucked, kernels cut from cob (about 2 cups)
2 medium Green Zebra tomatoes, cored and chopped (about 2 cups)
¼ cup pepitas (pumpkin seeds), toasted
½ cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
½ cup crumbled cotija cheese, (optional) (about 2 ounces)
½ cup Ancho Chili Vinaigrette(recipe follows)
½ teaspoon coarse salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper


IN A LARGE BOWL, combine the corn, tomatoes, pepitas, cilantro, and cheese, if using. Pour the vinaigrette over the vegetables, season with salt and pepper, and toss to combine. Serve chilled or at room temperature.


GREEN TOMATOES

I prefer Green Zebra tomatoes (which have telltale streaky green-and-white skins) for their slightly tart taste. Truth is, almost any firm green tomato will do the trick. Actually, if you're jonesing for this fresh vegetable dish before green tomatoes show up at your market, simply swap in whichever red or other more vibrantly hued variety you prefer.


ANCHO CHILI VINAIGRETTE

Ancho is a sweet dried chili that imbibes a seductive, smoky depth. I love that it possesses full flavor but won't blow your head off with fiery spice. The coffee-colored Ancho Chili Vinaigrette also works as a marinade for Latin American-flavored grilled flank steak or drizzled on sweet tropical fruit, such as mango and papaya.

1 tablespoon ancho chili powder
1 chipotle pepper in adobo, seeded if desired and minced
1 jalapeño, halved, seeded, and minced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
¼ cup Champagne vinegar
Juice of 1 lime
1 tablespoon honey or agave nectar
1 cup canola oil
1 teaspoon coarse salt


IN A BLENDER, combine the ancho powder, chipotle, jalapeño, garlic, cumin, vinegar, lime juice, and honey. Blend until smooth. With the motor running, slowly add the oil until emulsified. Season with salt. Pour the vinaigrette into a plastic container or jar and keep any leftover covered in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Makes 1 cup


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Lemonade Cookbook by Alan Jackson, JoAnn Cianciulli, Victoria Pearson. Copyright © 2013 Alan Jackson and JoAnn Cianciulli. Excerpted by permission of St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Meet the Author

ALAN JACKSON's mini-chain of Lemonade cafes are taking Los Angeles by storm. Five years ago, Jackson left the fine-dining scene to open the fast-casual restaurant Lemonade in West Hollywood; it was so successful, he opened eight additional locations, with more to come. Alan has had a love affair with food and creating memorable meals in Los Angeles since the mid-90s, when he opened Jackson's and The Farm in Beverly Hills. Alan lives with his family in L.A.

JOANN CIANCIULLI has written nearly a dozen cookbooks, most recently the acclaimed L.A.'s Original Farmers Market Cookbook and Recipe Rehab. As a culinary producer, her television credits include Top Chef, Master Chef, Recipe Rehab, and The Next Iron Chef. She lives in L.A.


ALAN JACKSON's mini-chain of Lemonade cafes are taking Los Angeles by storm. Five years ago, Jackson left the fine-dining scene to open the fast-casual restaurant Lemonade in West Hollywood; it was so successful, he opened eight additional locations, with more to come. Alan has had a love affair with food and creating memorable meals in Los Angeles since the mid-90s, when he opened Jackson's and The Farm in Beverly Hills. Alan lives with his family in L.A.
JOANN CIANCIULLI has written nearly a dozen cookbooks, most recently the acclaimed L.A.'s Original Farmers Market Cookbook and Recipe Rehab. As a culinary producer, her television credits include Top Chef, Master Chef, Recipe Rehab, and The Next Iron Chef. She lives in L.A.

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The Lemonade Cookbook: Southern California Comfort Food from L.A.'s Favorite Modern Cafeteria 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you love the food at Lemonade, this is a must have for the home cook. Easy to follow recipes, delicious results.