The Life and Legacy of Annie Oakley

Overview

With a widowed mother and six siblings, Annie Oakley first became a trapper, hunter, and sharpshooter simply to put food on the table. Yet her genius with the gun eventually led to her stardom in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show during the latter half of the nineteenth century. The archetypal western woman, Annie Oakley urged women to take up shooting to procure food, protect themselves, and enjoy healthy exercise, yet she was also the proper Victorian lady, demurely dressed and skeptical about the value of women’s ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (21) from $2.07   
  • New (6) from $12.10   
  • Used (15) from $2.07   
The Life and Legacy of Annie Oakley

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.99
BN.com price
(Save 39%)$19.95 List Price

Overview

With a widowed mother and six siblings, Annie Oakley first became a trapper, hunter, and sharpshooter simply to put food on the table. Yet her genius with the gun eventually led to her stardom in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show during the latter half of the nineteenth century. The archetypal western woman, Annie Oakley urged women to take up shooting to procure food, protect themselves, and enjoy healthy exercise, yet she was also the proper Victorian lady, demurely dressed and skeptical about the value of women’s suffrage. Glenda Riley presents the first interpretive biography of the complex woman who was Annie Oakley.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
When many people think of Annie Oakley, they may have a vague memory that she was a real person and may wonder how much was myth and how much reality when it came to her legendary prowess as a sharpshooter. The existence of a well-known Broadway musical, replete with songs by Irving Berlin, doesn't usually support the idea that a person has any basis in history. With Annie Oakley, however, the legend is largely true. What is missing, however, is at least as interesting. She was a complex, independent woman who was responsible for supporting her widowed mother and younger siblings, even while she was still a child. For all her independence, she was in many ways cool to the idea of women's suffrage; her area of interest lay more in encouraging women to engage in athletics, and freeing them from hats and corsets. For all her many years of touring in Wild West shows, Oakley maintained much of her privacy. Although she disliked the label "new woman" (used then to describe nonconformist women who had careers and sought education), Annie Oakley was indeed one of those wonderful "new" women of the 19th century who led the way for so many dramatic changes in the 20th century. Because of her enigmatic nature, there is much we may never know, but Glenda Riley (a professor of history at Ball State University) has done an excellent job of presenting the facts and considering the placement in social history of Oakley's legacy. Recommended for all libraries. KLIATT Codes: SA—Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 1994, Univ. of Oklahoma Press, 252p. illus. notes. index., Gillen
Library Journal
Those who know of Annie Oakley largely through film and theater portrayals by Barbara Stanwyck, Ethel Merman, or Betty Hutton will find a more nuanced and complete biography of "Little Sure Shot" (as Chief Sitting Bull called her) at the hands of Riley. Author of Western studies such as A Place To Grow: Women in the American West (Harlan Davidson, 1992), the author here provides not only a biography of Oakley but also an evaluation of her legend and influence-a woman who sought economic equality and recognition for women in a male-dominated profession, but who, as a proper Victorian lady, opposed suffrage for women. Riley's is the latest and most scholarly in a long line of biographies, including Shirl Kasper's excellent study, Annie Oakley (LJ 3/15/92).-Nicholas C. Burckel, Washington Univ. Libs., St. Louis
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780806135069
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
  • Publication date: 10/28/2002
  • Series: Oklahome Western Biographies Series
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 972,655
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.77 (d)

Meet the Author

Glenda Riley, the author of numerous books regarding women in the American West, is retired as the Alexander M. Bracken Professor of History at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)