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The Life and Times of Cicero (Biography from Ancient Civilizations Series)
     

The Life and Times of Cicero (Biography from Ancient Civilizations Series)

by Kathleen Tracy
 
Brilliant, arrogant, passionate, ambitious, and, ultimately, enduring, Cicero is considered the greatest of all Roman orators. Determined to be famous from a young age, Cicero first made a name for himself in his twenties as a fiery attorney, who won many cases solely on the power of his speeches. He entered politics and quickly worked his way up the Roman political

Overview

Brilliant, arrogant, passionate, ambitious, and, ultimately, enduring, Cicero is considered the greatest of all Roman orators. Determined to be famous from a young age, Cicero first made a name for himself in his twenties as a fiery attorney, who won many cases solely on the power of his speeches. He entered politics and quickly worked his way up the Roman political hierarchy until he fulfilled his dream of joining the all-powerful Roman Senate. It was there that Cicero delivered some of his most famous orations in an effort to prevent political corruption, civic unrest, and general incompetence from diminishing the republic he loved. In his later years, Cicero wrote philosophical essays on the law and the duties of public servants that are still studied in university law schools. In the end, it was Cicero's political outspokenness that cost him his life. But dying for his beliefs insured that his dream of being remembered through the ages came true.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-While these titles are well illustrated and have simplified basic maps and glossaries, they fail to explain adequately the importance of these figures throughout history or their impact on society today. Cicero is particularly confusing. With no contextual explanation of the Roman political system, modern readers will be very perplexed. There are also inconsistencies and errors. Herodotus and Plato are choppily written, poorly organized, and incomplete. So little is known about Herodotus's life that most of the book rehashes the Persian War, misspelling a key player (it's Sicinnus, not Sinnicus). Plato focuses on the man's political writings and omits his famous allegory of the cave. Aristotle, a vast improvement over the other titles, is still only adequate. Margaret J. Anderson and Karen F. Stephenson's Aristotle (Enslow, 2004) is just as serviceable.-Ann W. Moore, Schenectady County Public Library, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584155102
Publisher:
Mitchell Lane Pub Inc
Publication date:
04/28/2006
Series:
Biography from Ancient Civilizations: Legends, Folklore, and Stories of Ancient Worlds Series
Edition description:
Library Edition
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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