The Life of Illness: One Woman's Journey

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A woman's account of life with kidney disease. Surviving her similarly afflicted siblings, she has lived for 20 years only because of kidney dialysis. An inspiration to others with long- term debilitating diseases, and an insight for health professionals into the patient's perspective. Also includes her sister's diary. Paper edition (unseen), $9.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Introductory Essay: Others

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Illness in My Family

Introducing My Work

Chapter 1. Epigraph for Joy

Joy's Diary

Chapter 2. Heartbeat Wrapped With Plastic

Past Lives

Machine Life

My Mother's Response to Illness

Darkness Threatens

Research Objects

Blood Tests

X-rays

Surgeries

Common Sense Research

Pure Water

To the Law Courts Building

Arthur and I Respond to Dialysis — 1975

Machine Progress

Blood

Blood Water

New Bone, New Life

Protection from Medicine

Patient Education for Individual Care

Informed Consent for Individual Care

Illness is Personal

Chapter 3. The Question of Technology

Children of Technology

Dialysis

The Meaning of Speaking and Listening

Chapter 4. The Question of Understanding

Can We Understand?

Hermeneutic Phenomenology

Expressing Our Response to Illness

Experience as Dialogue

Chapter 5. The Question of Theorizing

Theory Building

Theory Finding

Parsons' Theorizing: Professional Health Care

Critiques of Parsons' Theory

Two Revolutionary Experiments

Where Does "Theorizing in Order to Produce a Collective" Lead?

Heidegger's Theorizing: The Homecoming Journey

Chapter 6. A Pathway for Theorizing

Wonder at What Is: Language and Truthfulness

Speech in the Light of Logos: The Work of Art and Theorizing

Kierkegaard's Theorizing: The Freedom of Faith

Theorizing with Examples

Theorizing with Thematic Questions

Responding to Kierkegaard's Theorizing

Taking Up the Journey

Chapter 7. Ivan Ilyitch: One against the Other Searches for the Other

On The Death of Ivan Ilyitch : The Chaplain Speaks

Encounter with Death

Against Death

Against Deception

The Struggle for Truth

The Doctor Gives Hope

Against God

Listening to the Voice of Conscience

Against Self and Family

The Minister Gives Hope

From Hope to Hopelessness

The Miracle of Forgiveness

Set Free

The Meaning of the Last Moment

Letting Go of the Things

Caius to Ivan

Moments to Memories

Invalid to In-valid

Disease to Disease

Pain to Despair

Help to Hope

The needy master

Hope is a promise of help

Judgment to Mercy

All Moments to the Last Moment

Chapter 8. Pauline Erickson: One with the Other

On "Pauline's Diary": The Patient Speaks

Self-pity

Pain

Blessings

Changing

Giving

Transcending Captivity

Hope

Hope for Tomorrow

Peace

Hope for Today

The Struggle to be Born into a Life of Illness

Self-pity is Honorable as a Step Away from Self-pity

The Pain of Illness

The pain of illness is loss

The pain of illness is bearing the grief as hope

We Find Refuge in Blessings

Each of Our Days is an Invitation to Live as though it were our Dying Day

To Live is to Give

The Body, After All, is not the Source or the Limit of Our Being

Hope is Stronger than Death

Hope is the acceptance of blessings not yet received

Hope is the longing for healing

Hope is the acceptance of what we cannot understand

We bear the grief of death as hope

Life Gives Us Peace

Chapter 9. Doctor Rieux: One for the Other

On The Plague : The Doctor Speaks

The Fact of the Doctor's Diagnosis

The Doctor Finds Solace

The Meanings of Being a Doctor

To Have a Heart for Healing and No Cure

Life and the Doctor of Death

The Doctor Fights for Life

The Doctor Questions All Values

The Heart of Pity

Science does not Pity

Science because of Pity

The Heart of Pity is "A Sympathy Full of Regret" for "All the Pain"

The heart of pity is the manner of care

The heart of pity is the mortal helping the mortal

The heart of pity is renewed by death

Chapter 10. Florence Nightingale: One by the Other

On Florence Nightingale and Notes on Nursing: The Nurse Speaks

What Nursing Does

Seeing Illness

Light at Night

The Presence of Care

To Be There, a Nurse

To Be There, a Nurse, is to Ease the Dis-ease of Illness

To Be There, a Nurse, is to Remember that the Ill Person Feels Far From Home

To Be There, a Nurse, is to See Pain in the Light of Hope

Chapter 11. Lord Tennyson: One without the Other

On "In Memoriam,": The Mother Speaks

To Speak About Grief

Dark House

The Paradox of Calm

Sharing a Life

Life Stops (The First Christmas After)

"Be Near Me"

Learning to Trust

To be Silent About Grief

Life Goes On (The Second Christmas After)

Eulogy

Song of Hope

Chapter 12. The Homecoming

Children of God

Eddie's Homecoming

Chapter 13. Epilogue

Student of a Research Question

Researching Phenomenological Texts

Yields of the Literary Texts

Yields of the Writing

Friendship

Notes

Bibliography

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