The Lincoln Deception

( 21 )

Overview

A deathbed confession and a long-hidden conspiracy are at the heart of a riveting historical mystery centered on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

In March 1900, as former Congressman John Bingham of Ohio lies dying, he begins to tell a strange tale to his physician, Dr. Jamie Fraser. Bingham famously prosecuted eight members of John Wilkes Booth's plot to kill Lincoln. But during the 1865 trial, conspirator Mary Surratt divulged a secret ...

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The Lincoln Deception

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Overview

A deathbed confession and a long-hidden conspiracy are at the heart of a riveting historical mystery centered on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

In March 1900, as former Congressman John Bingham of Ohio lies dying, he begins to tell a strange tale to his physician, Dr. Jamie Fraser. Bingham famously prosecuted eight members of John Wilkes Booth's plot to kill Lincoln. But during the 1865 trial, conspirator Mary Surratt divulged a secret so explosive it could shatter the republic.

Though Bingham takes the secret to his grave, Fraser cannot let go of the mystery. Bored with small-town medical practice, he begins to investigate, securing an unlikely ally in Speed Cook, a black, college-educated professional ballplayer and would-be newspaper publisher. Cook is fascinated by Fraser's inquiry and, like Fraser, thinks the accepted version of Lincoln's assassination rings false. Was Booth truly the mastermind or were other, more powerful forces pulling the strings?

From Maryland to New York City, from Indiana to Washington, Fraser and Cook track down key figures and witnesses—including Mary Surratt's neurotic daughter Anna, Booth's nephew, actor Creston Clarke, and Clarke's attractive business manager, Mrs. Eliza Scott. Piece by piece the truth emerges—separating fact from rumor, innocent from guilty, and revealing a story of greed, ambition, courage, and tragedy.

Blending real and fictional characters, The Lincoln Deception is a superbly researched, brilliantly plotted and thoroughly gripping mystery that explores one of the nation's darkest and most fascinating eras and the conspiracy that changed world history.

Advance Praise For David O. Stewart And The Lincoln Deception

"David O. Stewart has done more than write an historical novel: The Lincoln Deception is concocted in the best traditions of the genre. He's unearthed a remote, fascinating and still-relevant tidbit from the past, then brought it to breathless, riveting life with vivid prose, top-notch research, stunning evocations of turn-of-the-century America, and masterful urgency. Entertaining, educating, and elevating." —David L. Robbins, author of War of the Rats and The Devil's Waters

"David O. Stewart dramatically reopens the file on the Lincoln assassination conspiracy with a nail-biting, historically grounded page turner. Where the facts end and the fiction begins will inspire plenty of debate. Meanwhile enjoy this for the terrific read Stewart provides." —Harold Holzer, author of Lincoln, official young adult companion book to the Steven Spielberg film

"David O. Stewart, a distinguished writer of historical nonfiction, brings off a remarkable feat in his debut novel. Seizing on the enigmatic last words of the man who prosecuted the Booth conspirators, Stewart transforms a little-known aspect of Lincoln assassination lore into a gripping mystery story. With its sharp plotting and engaging characters, the novel succeeds as both a thriller and a historical inquiry." —Daniel Stashower, author of The Hour of Peril: The Secret Plot to Murder Lincoln Before the Civil War

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Set in 1900, this impressive debut novel from historian Stewart (American Emperor) opens with Jamie Fraser, an Ohio country doctor, agonizing over the cryptic deathbed revelation of 85-year-old John Bingham, the respected statesman who tried the conspirators in the 16th president’s murder: Mary Surratt, an accomplice to assassin John Wilkes Booth, privately confessed to Bingham a secret that threatened “the survival of the republic.” Along with Speed Cook, a black ex-baseball player and aspiring newspaperman, Fraser obsesses over parsing this secret, which could reveal a conspiracy that reaches beyond Booth to the higher powers of the Union and the Confederacy. Traversing New York City, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., the amateur sleuths confront henchmen of the shadowy Sons of Liberty, racist mobs, and powerful financiers, whose cotton-trading connections are somehow tied to the fateful night at Ford’s Theater. Eschewing the wild fantasies of many conspiracy thrillers, Stewart constructs a plausible version of history that works as both fiction and speculative inquiry. Agent: Will Lippincott, Lippincott Massie McQuilkin. (Sept.)
Library Journal
09/01/2013
Physician Jamie Fraser is stunned when his dying patient, John Bingham, the lead prosecutor for the Lincoln assassination trials, confesses that there was more to the Lincoln case than was ever revealed. John alludes to an evil force that would have threatened the nation's survival. Later, Jamie searches through John's letters and papers for evidence to bolster that tantalizing possibility. Meanwhile, Speed Cook, a confident and college-educated black man who dreams of publishing his own newspaper, strolls into Jamie's life. He, too, feels compelled to learn more about this mystery. Jamie and Speed forge an uneasy alliance fortified by subsequent battles and close calls with assorted bad guys as they pursue false leads and uncover surprising new facts in Baltimore, New York, and Washington, DC. VERDICT Historian Stewart's (Impeached; American Emperor) debut novel, set in 1900, is dense with detail and intrigue, making a hearty read for conspiracy addicts.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780758290670
  • Publisher: Kensington Publishing Corporation
  • Publication date: 8/27/2013
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 198,398
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

A former attorney, David O. Stewart is the author of The Summer of 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution, which won the Washington Writing Award as Best Book of 2007, Impeached: The Trial of President Andrew Johnson and the Fight for Lincoln’s Legacy, and American Emperor, Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America. He lives in Maryland and his website is at www.davidostewart.com.
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Read an Excerpt

The LINCOLN Deception


By DAVID O. STEWART

KENSINGTON PUBLISHING CORP.

Copyright © 2013 David O. Stewart
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-7582-9068-7


CHAPTER 1

"I've been recalling Mrs. Surratt," the old man said. "A perfect she-lion, she was." His blue eyes glinted briefly, then faded to a vague, watery look.

Leaning over the bed, Dr. Jamie Fraser placed his stethoscope against the old man's narrow chest. The heartbeat was feathery. Fluid rasped in the lungs. Always slender, John Bingham seemed to have shrunk further. Nothing in particular was killing the most distinguished man ever produced by Cadiz, Ohio. After eighty-five years of life, he was wearing out. In 1900, not many in eastern Ohio lived long enough to wear out. Bingham had been tougher than he looked. Emma Bingham, who shared the big house on Main Street with her father, hovered on the other side of the bed.

"Mrs. Surratt?" the doctor ventured. "She was the one involved in killing Lincoln?"

The old man shook his head slightly. "Jamie," he breathed. "Someday you must learn about the world around you. It was the greatest crime of our age. It ranks with the murder of Julius Caesar."

"Of course you're right, sir, but as soon as I sit down with a worthy book or magazine, I inevitably receive a message that some thoughtless creature like Mrs. McDade over in Hopedale has gone into labor, and off I go."

"Or some old duffer like me takes his own sweet time about dying."

"Rest, sir," Fraser said in his warmest professional tone, "that's what you need. Spring is coming, though there's not much feel of the season out there. By the time the tulips are up, you'll be back out on your front porch, admiring the butterflies and greeting your friends."

"That's a poor lie," the old man said, "to a man who soon will meet his maker." He turned his eyes back to the doctor. "There's no risk I'll meet Mrs. Surratt."

Fraser dropped into the chair on his side of the sickbed. "They hanged her, didn't they? Was there any injustice in it?"

Bingham showed a trace of a smile. "Barely the beginning of justice." He stirred and frowned. "Can my head be higher?"

Emma stacked pillows and bolsters behind him, her narrow face yellow in the kerosene light. Fraser preferred the brightness of his new gaslights, but the old man probably couldn't afford the innovation. Mr. Bingham's treasures from Japan had long since vanished, sold to support his two daughters and grandson. When the patient leaned back on the imposing structure of supporting cushions, his head was nearly upright. He asked for a cup of broth. Expelling a quick breath that might have been exasperation, Emma left.

"There was a week that summer," he began, "a hellish one. We had in hand the verdicts for all eight of those wretches in Booth's conspiracy. But the judgments, you see, couldn't be announced until President Johnson approved them." He coughed shallowly and closed his eyes. After a small sigh, he resumed, his eyes bright again. "It was hot. Washington is the veriest inferno in summer. That prison held the heat perfectly, like sitting inside a brick oven.

"I was called to Mrs. Surratt's chamber, a complaint of her daughter. After hearing the girl out—she was rather hysterical, a pale whelp of the original she-lion—I informed her I couldn't help. It was something about food, nothing to do with me as prosecutor."

Fraser nodded, pleased by Bingham's sudden energy and the subject of his conversation. Bingham rarely talked about his public career. He preferred to inquire about other people's business or to hold forth on current affairs. Fraser knew the basics about the old gentleman that everyone in Cadiz knew. He had prosecuted the Lincoln conspirators, securing convictions of all eight and death sentences for four. He wrote the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution, led the effort to impeach President Andrew Johnson, and for twelve years was the U.S. Ambassador to Japan. Fraser wished he knew more about the Lincoln case.

The old man picked up his story. "Mrs. Surratt sat there, perfectly composed in that heat, monstrous in her lack of remorse.

All that was missing were snakes sprouting from her head. She told the daughter to leave us. 'Mr. Bingham,' said she, 'the verdicts are in, are they not?' I assured her I could make no statement on the matter. 'We are to be hanged,' she said, 'are we not?' Again, I said I could say nothing. 'I don't think that very Christian of you,' she went on. 'I suppose we will be told soon enough.'"

Bingham paused, his eyes straying into the middle distance. He shifted toward Fraser. "Then began the most remarkable exchange." The old man shook his head. "What she told me. You must understand, I was no babe in arms. I was in Congress during vicious times before the war. As Judge Advocate General, I prosecuted our disloyal men. I knew the horrors of the bloodiest war man has fought, of the horrors of which the human spirit is capable. And yet that woman unsettled my very soul.

"Afterward, I went to Stanton." Fraser knew about Edwin Stanton, from nearby Steubenville, who had been Lincoln's rock, the redoubtable Secretary of War. "I never saw that great good man so vexed as when I related Mrs. Surratt's confession." Bingham's eyes drifted again to the far wall. The memory seemed to seize his entire attention.

"Finally, we agreed," Bingham added slowly. "Her confession was too ... terrible. To reveal it would be to risk the survival of the republic."

Fraser wasn't sure he heard correctly. "Sir, the survival of the republic?" He used a coaxing tone. What could Bingham mean? What secret part of the assassination plot, what beyond the murder of the martyr-president had held the power to destroy the nation?

Bingham's eyelids slowly descended. His jaw went slack. He sagged back onto the massed pillows and his breath became shallow. Disappointed that the story had petered out, Fraser reminded himself that sleep was good for Mr. Bingham.

With a clatter, Emma placed a tray on a nearby table. Her father didn't stir. Fraser placed his stethoscope in his black bag and rose to leave.


The next evening, Emma met the doctor at the door with a fretful look. As Fraser peeled off his coat, damp from a punishing sleet, she explained that her father slept much of the day, taking only a piece of dry toast and some water. Reverend McGregor from United Presbyterian had stopped in, but the old man had not known him. Fraser took her hands. "Let me have a look," he said quietly. She led him into the sickroom.

The weak blue eyes opened when he called the old man's name.

"Hello, Jamie," he said. "Nice to see you." With a quick movement, Emma placed a balled-up handkerchief to her mouth. She sat again on the hard chair across the bed from the doctor. "Dear child," Bingham said to her, "our Savior will watch over me. And I have no pain."

"Will you have tea, Father? Some toast?"

"If I must."

Emma smiled and patted his arm. "I'll get them while Jamie keeps you company."

As she left, Fraser drew his stethoscope from his black bag.

"Must you?" Bingham asked.

"It is," Fraser answered, "what I am supposed to do."

"Emma's idea is better. Keep me company. How did Mrs. McDade fare?"

Fraser reported the delivery of a new daughter to the McDades of Hopedale. For the last year, births had not been entirely happy events for the doctor. His mind always returned to the death of his wife, Ginny, in their own house. Grieving for their little son, who lay cold and still in his arms, he had been slow to notice Ginny's weakening, her bleeding mostly internal. Her life slipped away while he—her physician-husband—feverishly applied packing and douches to no good end. He had sent the midwife for old Doc Marcotte, but it was too late. He lost them both. Fraser still gave thanks to God for every birth, but he could never suppress his resentment over the careless way He took Ginny and his baby.

The catastrophe strengthened Fraser's tie with Bingham. The old man took the new widower in hand. For two days, he shielded Fraser from the well-meaning people who came to call. Then Bingham made him wash and shave, dress decently, and face the world. Combining stern words with a vibrant sympathy that dwelt in those deep-set eyes, the old man brought Fraser back from the darkness.

Not all the way back, though. Part of Jamie remained in that room with Ginny and the baby—helpless, blundering, stupid, unmanned by innocent death.

After Fraser described the raw mid-March weather to Bingham, they fell into silence. The doctor could not restrain himself.

"Sir," he began, "last night you mentioned an interview you had with Mrs. Surratt, just before her hanging. I read a bit about the case this morning and remembered your description of her as so fierce. A she-lion, you said. She was portrayed far differently at the time."

"I suppose you were looking at Townsend's little volume? Ah, she fooled a great many, even old Gath." He smiled slightly. "But she knew she hadn't fooled me. So on that day she didn't even try."

"You mentioned a confession," Fraser said, "the one you discussed with Mr. Stanton. Well, sir, I was ... I wondered if perhaps now, after so many years, it would be well to get it out? Why, after all, did she confess if not to have it known?"

"Ah, Jamie, you're exactly right. She wanted it known. Even from the grave, she meant to continue her evil mischief against our poor nation. That was why Stanton and I would never reveal it." After a pause, Bingham said, "I gave my word. Stanton took the secret to the grave. So shall I."


A few days later, to honor John Bingham's passing, a thousand people and more crushed into the Harrison County courthouse, a great stone temple that crowned the central hill of Cadiz. Businesses closed and every lawyer and Union Army veteran from three counties streamed into town. The mourners overflowed into side rooms and corridors where they could neither hear nor see.

The service was long, as befitted a man of such distinction. The condolence messages had poured in, beginning with one from President McKinley, a cousin of some description. Reverend McGregor would not be satisfied with less than an hour's oration, having delivered a speech almost as long during the family service that morning. Seated at the front as a pallbearer, Fraser found himself wondering, uncharitably, about the black-clad figures of the two Bingham daughters. Small and slim like their father, they had his haunted, sunken eye sockets. Yet they somehow had missed his spirit and grace. On him, the great eyes conveyed a depth of soul; on them, they called to mind the raccoon family.

For fifteen years, since returning from Japan, the old gentleman was a paternal presence Fraser had not known before. Bingham had been a good friend to Fraser's father, Captain Robert Fraser of the 30th Ohio, who returned from the Civil War an empty husk. He had fallen to fever in the swamps near Vicksburg and never really recovered. Recurring bouts of illness sapped his body and spirit for the few more years he had, pretending to run the family's dry goods store.

Fraser, born months after his father marched off to war, had tried to imagine his father as a vital leader of men. As a boy, he gazed at the daguerreotype of the handsome captain of the 30th Ohio. Now, Fraser resembled the man in that frame, tall and sandy haired, with broad shoulders, not at all like the distantly remembered parent with a wracking cough and no energy.

For years, Fraser's mind held only the piercing gaze of that young soldier in the gilt frame. After losing Ginny and the baby, that image faded. In its place came a long-suppressed memory of a slender man whose gentle gaze made Fraser feel awkward when it fell on him. On cold days, the man sat by a wood stove in the store, a blanket over his legs, while Jamie's mother sold sheets and towels, cloth and thread, ready-to-wear jackets and work pants, even delicate items for ladies. Sometimes an old man or two sat with his father, but the boy didn't. He ran errands for his mother or hurried off with friends, escaping the invalid who seemed to haunt the store. The revived memory hurt. Fraser had been too young to know the Union soldier, and too ashamed to know the ailing husk who came in his place.

Bingham showed a special interest in young Jamie, smoothing his way when he became Dr. James Fraser. In Cadiz, being John Bingham's doctor was a sure ticket to medical and social acceptance. Sometimes Bingham had remembered the vital Captain Fraser, who shared his passions for ending slavery, for the Republican Party, and for the novels of Sir Walter Scott. That man had driven Bingham to political meetings, sometimes using his bulk to shield the fiery young congressmen from those who feared the end of slavery would mean the end of the nation. For Fraser, it was like hearing about a stranger.

When the memorial service concluded, the crowd began to shuffle by Bingham's coffin in a ragged file. At either end of the open casket, uniformed veterans of the Grand Army of the Republic stood at attention. Fraser stepped quickly out of the building. He needed air.

Looking over the hills under a cloud-mottled sky, he felt the hint of a warmer season. The shops and houses marched downhill in each direction, fading after a few blocks into tidy farms. He thought again, with a surge of emotion, of what he had lost. First his father, later his mother, then Ginny and the baby, now Mr. Bingham. He felt empty. Yet the story of Mrs. Surratt's confession lingered in his mind. Why had the old man told him about it without revealing what her confession was?

"Care for a nip?" Charles Nugent, a fellow pallbearer, nudged him. "Still cool, ain't it?"

"That's a kindness," Fraser said, accepting a metal flask of corn whiskey. After taking a swallow, and a second one, he added, "That's got some backbone."

"John preferred it that way."

"Charles, you were as close a friend as Mr. Bingham had."

"We got on. He wasn't quite the saint that Reverend McGregor would have him, but I've never known as fine a man."

"Nor I," Fraser said quickly. "But I've wondered, in the times you were together, did he talk much about the Lincoln trial, about Mrs. Surratt?"

"Oh, now and again, when something would come out from some Democrat still angry about the war, trying to stir up the flames again. You know how they say the trial was unfair or that the Surratt woman was innocent. He might pass a remark on it."

"Did he ever say he knew something about her that these other people, these ones doing the complaining, didn't know?"

"Not that I recollect. You know, Jamie, I don't believe John lost a minute's sleep over that case. Not so I could see. He was proud of sending those villains to the gallows. I think he would've liked to hang all of them."

Fraser nodded. He hunched his shoulders against a cold gust. "I should get back inside."

To Fraser's eye, close to half the crowd had filed past the coffin, gazing respectfully at the old man in whom they took such pride. Fraser assumed a formal stance at the spot where the line turned away from the coffin, the point where some broke their silence and murmured to a neighbor. Cheeks were damp, hard features clenched against strong feelings. Mr. Bingham had touched many. Fraser was stirred by the visible grief.

A man with a café-au-lait complexion stood at the coffin. During the ceremony, the colored mourners had gathered in a side room. Bingham stood high in the area's small Negro community.

His opposition to slavery before the war had propelled him into the fight for the rights of the freed slaves after it. If the colored mourners were reaching the coffin, Fraser thought, the line must be nearing its end.

The man wore a black woolen suit that would look well on any lawyer or merchant. His collar was high, starched, and a brilliant white. A silver watch chain dangled across his waistcoat. When he turned toward Fraser, his eyes were glassy, but his movements were sure. He looked familiar, but Fraser couldn't place him. His hair had early flecks of gray, as did his thick mustache. He passed close to Fraser, leading several other Negro mourners.

Turning back to the line, Fraser was surprised to find white people still inching toward the coffin. The rest of Harrison County's colored weren't even in view yet. The man in black had been far ahead of his turn.

The Union Army veterans, wearing the faded uniforms they had cherished for thirty-five years, took charge of the burial. Fraser thought of the American soldiers again fighting and dying, this time in the Philippines, halfway around the world.
(Continues...)


Excerpted from The LINCOLN Deception by DAVID O. STEWART. Copyright © 2013 David O. Stewart. Excerpted by permission of KENSINGTON PUBLISHING CORP..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 21 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 2, 2013

    You know him from his three, thoroughly crafted non-fiction book

    You know him from his three, thoroughly crafted non-fiction books from which he enriched our understanding of the United States Constitution and how it was created, from the point of view of those 55 men who created it in that, Summer of 1787.

    He also delved into the question of why a president, who simply fired his Secretary of War, was Impeached and nearly convicted in the Senate for doing so.

    And in his latest offering, he treats us to an investigative and most perplexing portrait of a sitting vice president who killed our nation’s first Treasury Secretary in 1804. But it was the author’s treatment of Aaron Burr’s frightening political vision, in stark contrast to what the founders fought for, that makes American Emperor such a compelling and thought-provoking read.

    It’s instructive to realize that some authors have trouble making the transition from one writing style (in this case, non-fiction) to another (fiction), but not this author.

    In his debut performance as a fiction writer, David O. Stewart proves once again that his prowess as a page-turning author and storyteller has not wavered one iota from his non-fiction offerings.

    In The Lincoln Deception, Mr. Stewart takes a factual event—the dying utterance of John Bingham, the man who prosecuted the Lincoln conspirators—and spins it into a period yarn that is an historic eye opener. He successfully crafted each chapter that compels the reader on, the sign of a great suspense writer.

    And something more esoteric that can easily be missed by anyone who reads a period work; Mr. Stewart very specifically captured the flavor of race relations in turn-of-the-century 1900 America with regard to the Jim Crow laws and how our protagonists (one white male and one black male) were treated by other characters as well as how they reacted to each other.

    Yet another triumph for Mr. Stewart that should find its way into the classroom!

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 25, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Samantha Rivera for Readers' Favorite The assassina

    Reviewed by Samantha Rivera for Readers' Favorite

    The assassination of Abraham Lincoln is one of the biggest pieces of the history of the United States. Not only was it an important event when it occurred, but in 1900, when this story takes place, it is still near the front of many people’s minds. No one ever found out for sure why the assassination took place or who was pulling the strings but Dr. Fraser and Speed Cook are determined to do just that. They aren’t willing to let history be written without all of the necessary facts, which means a little digging and danger of their own. That’s because in The Lincoln Deception some people have too much to lose to let the secrets come out.

    This story follows two men as they try to figure out exactly how and why President Lincoln was assassinated. It’s intriguing the way this story develops from one man’s deathbed confession into a huge quest that they can’t seem to walk away from, no matter how dangerous it gets. Stewart took an event that was perhaps one of the biggest mysteries in history and turned it into an even bigger one. This story is steeped in enough historical facts that you’ll be amazed by what you learn and, of course, amazed by the great way it all plays out in the end. You’ll learn things you never knew about the history of America and the people who helped on both sides of the Civil War. It’s never too late to learn the truth in The Lincoln Deception.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    A good read

    Very good book for those who like historical fiction. It gives a number of interesting theories.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2014

    Great read!

    Enjoyed this thoroughly.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2014

    Great book

    The plot to kill lincoln had to involve greater political will then just the known conspirators. This is a great book.

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  • Posted March 20, 2014

    The author is no doubt a fine historian, but this novel demonstr

    The author is no doubt a fine historian, but this novel demonstrates that he lacks skill of a story teller.  I am fewer than 50 pages from the end, but I'm throwing in the towel.  A fundamental of good storytelling is "show us what we need to know."  Far too much time is spent on filling us in about historical events and relationships.  Alternate theories of Lincoln'S assignation are told to us, not developed. The pedantic is sprinkled with various attacks against our heroes, but these do no move the plot. The Noel might be somewhat more engaging for those who are fans of conspiracy theories or Mr. Stewart.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 8, 2014

    Interesting story

    This was an interesting read of historical fiction. Check it out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2014

    Good read

    This book for the first couple of pages was a good read. Not overly thrilling, though it may improve.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 10, 2014

    Very Interesting, Very Readable.

    This is a fun historical novel with a lot of info.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2014

    Excellent yarn.

    A must read for history buffs. From one grain of factual data, Stewart spins a believable yarn of possibilities.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2014

    1st book in this genre first of many

    Enjoyed this book a lot of different elements involved given the period. 2 men different backgrounds able to be friends

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2014

    Makes you think....

    The story is very interesting and quite plausable. Did Boothe act alone? Could one man commit, plan and finance such an elaborate coup d' esta? The deathbed statement by an active participent who was there needed to be explored even if it was a fictional romp through history. Good story and amust read for Licoln followers and conspiracy zealots

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2013

    Uhhh

    Cool thats interesting

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2013

    G

    Y

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

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    Posted May 11, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2014

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    Posted March 27, 2014

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    Posted January 11, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2013

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