The Linden and the Oak

The Linden and the Oak

5.0 4
by Mark Wansa
     
 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780981186306
Publisher:
World Academy of Rusyn Culture
Publication date:
08/28/2009
Pages:
533
Sales rank:
760,768
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.40(d)

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The Linden and the Oak 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
MichaelKMK More than 1 year ago
A jewel within its own category. The book and its message transcend the cultural context. Based on a compelling true-life story the book manifests the resilience of the human spirit driven by universal values. Frankly, it was almost impossible to put down the book once open. The use of colorful "old country" language ads character and atmosphere to the book. The story is exquisitely researched and provides a remarkable historical as well as a social context zoomed onto the almost unknown ethnic group - the Rusyns - before, during and after WWI - in Europe and America. Having said that, I am hopeful for a sequel. I have no doubt the story would provide for an amazing background for a timeless big format Oscar-category movie.
Derson More than 1 year ago
Is your ancestry near the Carpathian Mountains? You may be from an ethnic minority known as Rusyns / Carpatho-Rusyns. The book is a good historical novel that interjects words, settings, and culture of the Rusyns. Sets back during the early 1900's - I like the characters and learning more from that era.
DouglasRachko More than 1 year ago
The Linden and the Oak is a monumental work of historical fiction, as comprehensive and riveting as Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago and Tolstoy's War and Peace. While the latter two titles involve wealthy aristocratic families, The Linden and the Oak tells the story of poor village people living in the Carpathian mountains of Eastern Europe around the time of WWI. In their daily lives, the characters share their beliefs and participate in many customs, giving the reader a good appreciation for some of the characteristics of Rusyn immigrants and their descendants in the U.S. Through the story, the reader is provided with a thorough and instructive account of the events in Europe during the period 1900-1920. The final chapters of the book, dealing with the hardships and heartbreak of emigration, are especially poignant, and the reader develops renewed respect for the courage of people who currently immigrate to the U.S. I had grown so fond of the characters in this story; I was sad to reach the end of the book. I shared the book with a brother-in-law and a cousin (also descendants of Rusyn immigrants). We all separately concurred that the story is begging for a sequel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago