The Linux Cookbook: Tips and Techniques For Everyday Use

Overview

The Linux Cookbook shows Linux users at all levels how to perform a variety of everyday computer tasks such as: printing stationery; converting and managing files; editing and formatting text; working with digital audio; and creating and manipulating graphics. The quick-reference, "cookbook"-style format, includes step-by-step Linux "recipes."

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Overview

The Linux Cookbook shows Linux users at all levels how to perform a variety of everyday computer tasks such as: printing stationery; converting and managing files; editing and formatting text; working with digital audio; and creating and manipulating graphics. The quick-reference, "cookbook"-style format, includes step-by-step Linux "recipes."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781886411487
  • Publisher: No Starch Press San Francisco, CA
  • Publication date: 4/28/2001
  • Pages: 402
  • Product dimensions: 7.32 (w) x 9.17 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Stutz was one of the first journalists to write about Linux and the free software movement in the mainstream press. A Linux user since the early 1990s, he has contributed to the GNU Project and the Linux Documentation Project. He is the architect of the Design Science License.

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Table of Contents

Preface 1
Format of Recipes 1
Assumptions, Scope, and Exclusions 2
Typographical Conventions 3
Versions, Latest Edition, and Errata 5
Acknowledgments 5
Part 1 Working with Linux 7
1 Introduction 9
1.1 Background and History 9
1.2 What to Try First 15
1.3 If You Need More Help 16
2 What Every Linux User Knows 17
2.1 Controlling Power to the System 17
2.2 Accounts and Privileges 18
2.3 Console Basics 20
2.4 Running a Command 22
2.5 Changing Your Password 24
2.6 Listing User Activity 24
2.7 Listing System Activity 26
2.8 Help Facilities 28
3 The Shell 35
3.1 Keys for Command Line Editing 35
3.2 Redirecting Input and Output 39
3.3 Managing Jobs 40
3.4 Command History 43
3.5 Recording a Shell Session 45
3.6 Customizing Your Shell 45
4 The X Window System 51
4.1 Running X 51
4.2 Running a Program in X 54
4.3 Manipulating X Client Windows 57
4.4 Moving around the Desktop 58
4.5 Running a Shell in X 59
4.6 Configuring X 59
Part 2 Files 63
5 Files and Directories 65
5.1 Naming Files and Directories 68
5.2 Changing Directories 69
5.3 Listing Directories 70
5.4 Copying Files and Directories 75
5.5 Moving Files and Directories 76
5.6 Removing Files and Directories 78
5.7 Giving a File More than One Name 79
5.8 Specifying File Names with Patterns 80
5.9 Browsing Files 81
6 Sharing Files 83
6.1 Groups and How to Work in Them 83
6.2 File Ownership 84
6.3 Controlling Access to Files 85
7 Finding Files 89
7.1 Finding All Files That Match a Pattern 89
7.2 Finding Files in a Directory Tree 89
7.3 Finding Files in Directory Listings 96
7.4 Finding Where a Command Is Located 97
8 Managing Files 99
8.1 Determining File Type and Format 99
8.2 Changing File Modification Time 99
8.3 Splitting a File into Smaller Ones 100
8.4 Comparing Files 101
8.5 Compressed Files 102
8.6 File Archives 103
8.7 Tracking Revisions to a File 105
Part 3 Text 109
9 Viewing Text 111
9.1 Perusing Text 111
9.2 Outputting Text 113
9.3 Streaming Text 116
9.4 Viewing a Character Chart 117
10 Text Editing 119
10.1 Choosing the Perfect Text Editor 119
10.2 Emacs 121
10.3 Running a Vi Tutorial 128
10.4 Selecting Text 128
10.5 Editing Streams of Text 129
10.6 Concatenating Text 130
10.7 Including Text Files 132
11 Grammar and Reference 135
11.1 Spelling 135
11.2 Dictionaries 139
11.3 Checking Grammar 142
11.4 Word Lists and Reference Files 145
12 Analyzing Text 149
12.1 Counting Text 149
12.2 Making a Concordance of a Text 150
12.3 Text Relevance 151
12.4 Finding Anagrams in Text 152
12.5 Finding Palindromes in Text 153
12.6 Text Cut-Ups 153
13 Formatting Text 155
13.1 Spacing Text 155
13.2 Paginating Text 158
13.3 Underlining Text 160
13.4 Sorting Text 161
13.5 Numbering Lines of Text 162
13.6 Reversing Text 163
14 Searching Text 165
14.1 Searching for a Word or Phrase 165
14.2 Regular Expressions--Matching Text Patterns 166
14.3 Searching More than Plain Text Files 171
14.4 Outputting the Context of a Search 172
14.5 Searching and Replacing Text 172
14.6 Searching Text in Emacs 173
14.7 Searching Text in Less 175
15 Typesetting and Word Processing 177
15.1 Choosing the Right Typesetting System for the Job 178
15.2 Converting Plain Text for Output 179
15.3 LyX Document Processing 185
15.4 Typesetting with TEX and Friends 189
15.5 Writing Documents with SGMLtools 193
15.6 Other Word Processors and Typesetting Systems 196
16 Fonts 199
16.1 X Fonts 199
16.2 Console Fonts 201
16.3 Text Fonts 202
16.4 Other Font Tools 204
Part 4 Images 205
17 Viewing Images 207
17.1 Previewing Print Files 207
17.2 Viewing an Image in X 208
17.3 Browsing Images in a Console 211
17.4 Viewing an Image in a Web Browser 212
17.5 Browsing PhotoCD Archives 212
17.6 Additional Image Viewers 213
18 Editing Images 215
18.1 Transforming Images 215
18.2 Converting Images between Formats 223
18.3 Editing Images with the GIMP 225
18.4 Interactive Image Editors and Tools 226
19 Importing Images 229
19.1 Taking Screen Shots 229
19.2 Scanning Images 230
19.3 Extracting PhotoCD Images 232
20 PostScript 235
20.1 Manipulating PostScript Pages 235
20.2 Manipulating PostScript Documents 238
20.3 Converting PostScript 239
Part 5 Sound 241
21 Sound Files 243
21.1 Sound File Formats 243
21.2 Adjusting the Audio Controls 244
21.3 Playing a Sound File 245
21.4 Recording a Sound File 247
21.5 Other Sound File Tools 248
22 Audio Compact Discs 249
22.1 Controlling CD Audio 249
22.2 Sampling Sound from a CD 251
22.3 Writing an Audio CD-R 252
22.4 Other Audio CD Applications 254
23 Editing Sound Files 255
23.1 Working with Selections from Sound Files 255
23.2 Sound Effects 256
23.3 Converting Sound Files 259
23.4 Other Tools for Sound Editing 261
Part 6 Productivity 263
24 Disk Storage 265
24.1 Listing a Disk's Free Space 265
24.2 Listing a File's Disk Usage 266
24.3 Floppy Disks 266
24.4 CD-ROMs 268
25 Printing 271
25.1 Making and Managing Print Jobs 271
25.2 More Recipes for Printing 273
25.3 Preparing Files for Printing 275
26 Cross-Platform Conversions 279
26.1 Using DOS and Windows Disks 279
26.2 Using Macintosh Disks 280
26.3 Converting Text Files between DOS and Linux 282
26.4 Converting Microsoft Word Files 283
27 Reminders 285
27.1 Displaying the Date and Time 285
27.2 Playing an Audible Time Announcement 286
27.3 Calendars 286
27.4 Managing Appointments 288
27.5 Contact Managers 291
27.6 Reminding Yourself of Things 294
28 Mathematics 297
28.1 Calculating Arithmetic 297
28.2 Outputting a Random Number 299
28.3 Listing a Sequence of Numbers 299
28.4 Finding Prime Factors 300
28.5 Converting Numbers 301
28.6 Other Math Tools 302
Part 7 Networking 305
29 Communications 307
29.1 Connecting to the Internet 307
29.2 Faxing 309
29.3 Calling Out on a Modem 312
30 Email 315
30.1 Sending Mail 315
30.2 Receiving Mail 317
30.3 Managing Mail 319
30.4 Mail Attachments 323
30.5 Making an Email Signature 324
30.6 Picking the Right Mail Application 325
31 The World Wide Web 327
31.1 Browsing the Web 327
31.2 Viewing an Image from the Web 330
31.3 Reading Text from the Web 330
31.4 Browsing the Web in Emacs 333
31.5 Getting Files from the Web 336
31.6 Writing HTML 338
31.7 More Web Browsers and Tools 340
32 Other Internet Services 343
32.1 Connecting to Another System 343
32.2 Transferring Files with Another System 345
32.3 Reading Usenet 348
32.4 Listing Online System and User Activity 350
32.5 Sending a Message to Another User's Terminal 353
32.6 Chatting with Other Users 354
Appendix A Administrative Issues 359
A.1 Linux and Hardware Compatibility 359
A.2 Installing Software 360
A.2.1 Getting and Installing Debian 360
A.2.2 Installing a Debian Package 360
A.2.3 Upgrading a Debian Package 361
A.2.4 Installing a Shell Script 362
A.3 Administrating Users 363
A.3.1 Making a User Account 363
A.3.2 Letting Users Access Hardware Peripherals 363
A.3.3 Letting Users Mount Drives 363
A.4 Displaying Information about the System 364
A.4.1 How Long Has the System Been Up? 364
A.4.2 What Version of Linux Am I Running? 364
A.4.3 What Version of Debian Am I Running? 365
Appendix B Linux Resources on the Web 367
Appendix C License 369
C.1 Design Science License 369
C.2 Applying Copyleft to Your Work 372
Program Index 373
Concept Index 379
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Introduction

I wrote this book because I want everyone to know how to use free (or "open source") software, because I think everyone deserves the freedom that comes with it. Linux is becoming ever more powerful and popular, and the free software movement is gaining ground -- everyone should know what it is all about, and how they can use it in their lives. Linux isn't hard to use, but if you're used to a completely different way of doing things, you might need someone to show you what to do. When you want to use your computer to do some task, you can break down the task into a "recipe" -- and that's what I've done to make it easy to use Linux. And anyone can follow a recipe. This book aims to give all of the easiest and most effective "recipes" for people who want to use a Linux-based computer system to get things done. Proprietary software denies you the freedoms that should be your right. You deserve better than that; you deserve the freedom of free software. Learn how to get it with The Linux Cookbook.
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