The Lion Is In: A Novel

( 8 )

Overview

“‘There are no miracles,” says Rita …. ‘Miracles are simply misunderstandings. Or worse, cons.’” –The Lion Is In

Tracee is a runaway bride and kleptomaniac. Lana’s an audacious beauty, a recovering alcoholic. Rita is a holy-roller minister’s wife, desperate to escape her marriage. One warm summer’s night, these three women go on the lam together. Their car breaks down on a rural highway in North Carolina and they’re forced to seek shelter in a seemingly abandoned nightclub. ...

See more details below
Paperback
$13.02
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$16.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (38) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $1.99   
  • Used (32) from $1.99   
The Lion Is In: A Novel

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview

“‘There are no miracles,” says Rita …. ‘Miracles are simply misunderstandings. Or worse, cons.’” –The Lion Is In

Tracee is a runaway bride and kleptomaniac. Lana’s an audacious beauty, a recovering alcoholic. Rita is a holy-roller minister’s wife, desperate to escape her marriage. One warm summer’s night, these three women go on the lam together. Their car breaks down on a rural highway in North Carolina and they’re forced to seek shelter in a seemingly abandoned nightclub. Which is where they meet Marcel. And soon everything changes. Marcel, you see, is a lion.

Written with the deftness, humor, and sparkling wit that mark her books, plays, and movies, Delia Ephron’s The Lion Is In is an unforgettable story of friendship, courage, love—and learning to salsa with the king of the jungle.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"One of the sharpest observers of human behavior around, Ephron, with her trademark mastery of smart, snappy dialogue, delivers a read-in-one-sitting, feel-good celebration of resiliency and hope." –Booklist (starred review)

“Imagine if Siegfried & Roy had written Water for Elephants…. The Lion Is In is off to the races from the first sentence. [A] fun ride.” –San Antonio Express News

“Readers seeking a heartfelt, offbeat adventure will adore Ephron's fragile but feisty heroines…The perfect getaway for readers who long to reconnect with their inner selves, this quirky comedy's sense of wonder will delight and inspire.” –Shelf Awareness for Readers

“Three women embark on a journey of self-discovery, facilitated by a giant feline, in Ephron’s whimsical but winsome third novel.” –Kirkus Reviews

“A gentle fable.”  -O: The Oprah Magazine

“The best kind of chick lit — an engaging feminist romance from which the reader emerges with a welcome mood boost. Twinkling with wit and warmth, it also packs a moral punch: We need to forgive not just each other, but ourselves, make amends wherever we can and just ease the heck up already.” –Newark Star Ledger

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780452298934
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/29/2013
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 326,747
  • Product dimensions: 5.37 (w) x 8.02 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

Delia Ephron

Delia Ephron is a bestselling author and screenwriter. Her movies include The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, You’ve Got Mail, Hanging Up (based on her novel), and Michael. She has written novels for adults and teenagers, and books of humor, including How to Eat Like a Child. Her essays have appeared in The New York Times, O: The Oprah Magazine, Vogue, More, The Wall Street Journal, and The Huffington Post. Recently, she collaborated with her sister Nora Ephron on the hit play, Love, Loss, and What I Wore, which ran for more than two years Off Broadway and has been performed all over the world, including Paris, Rio, and Sydney. She lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

INTRODUCTION

Three women are stranded in a small town when their getaway car breaks down. While hiding themselves from their pasts, and their secrets from each other, they find themselves bound in friendship and facing down their demons. The Lion is In is a whimsical but unforgettable story of three very different women embarking on a journey of self discovery influenced by the wise counsel of a retired circus lion.

ABOUT DELIA EPHRON

Delia Ephron is a bestselling author and screenwriter. Her movies include The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, You’ve Got Mail, Hanging Up (based on her novel), and Michael. She has written novels for adults and teenagers, books of humor, including How to Eat Like a Child, and essays. Her journalism has appeared in The New York Times, O: The Oprah Magazine, Vogue, More, and The Huffington Post. Recently, she collaborated with Nora Ephron on a play, Love, Loss, and What I Wore, which ran for two years off–Broadway and has been performed in cities around the world, including Paris, Rio de Janeiro, and Sydney.

A CONVERSATION WITH ALEXANDRA FULLER

1) What was your inspiration for this book?

A dream.

A most vivid dream about three women and a lion. There were two women in their twenties. I knew their names: Lana and Tracee. Lana was wearing ripped jeans, a t–shirt and those flat plastic shoes called Jellies. Tracee was in a wedding dress and veil. I knew that they were best friends from childhood, and there was an older woman with them, who, when I woke up, I named Rita. Lana, Tracee and Rita were in a strange place-a roadhouse bar, perhaps a seedy nightclub, built of all different construction materials hammered every which way. Living inside this odd looking roadhouse by the side of a rural highway in North Carolina (a state I had never visited in my life) was the bar’s mascot-Marcel, the lion. When I woke up, I wondered for a second if what I dreamed was real. Then I knew it was my next novel. For the two years I lived inside this world –– three women on the run, each with secrets, each with transgressions, real and imagined –– and the lion who would change their lives.

2) Did you consider any other animals as your focus or was the story always built around a lion? Does the lion symbolize something to you?

Marcel, my lion, was in the dream. And the dream told me the story. But I have a dog. I absolutely love dogs - and it changed my life to have a dog. They are so playful, and funny, and calming, and magical. One of my regrets is that I didn’t have dogs my whole life, and I transferred some of my affection for my dog to Marcel. But Marcel is a lion. He never does anything that a lion wouldn’t/couldn’t do (he was vetted by an expert at the San Diego Wild Animal Park) but in the course of the novel he is friend, shrink, higher power, dance partner, role model, in a way even lover. He’s in a cage, that’s important. He needs to be free, as do they all of the things that are holding them back. In our lives, sometimes to change we have to get in the cage with the lion. And sometimes we need to roar.

3) Which character did you most identify with?

All my characters are personal. With Rita, I especially identified with how trapped she was in her life, and her need to find the bravery to change. “Who I am is not a life sentence,” says Rita. That is the central issue for all the characters. With Tracee, I identified strongly with her need for love, and with Lana I identified with the struggle against her own demons. Lana has to believe in herself. I also believe in sisterhood - they all needed each other to get through, and that is something I feel about my close friends, how much braver they make me.

4) Most readers would look at Harry and his treatment of Rita with aversion. What are your feelings on Harry? Do you find it difficult to write unlikeable characters?

I don’t find it difficult to write unlikeable characters. It’s fun actually. It’s important, however, that they are complex. Harry’s tyrannical for sure, but he’s weak and needy and a little lost too. I have empathy for him. He doesn’t know joy.

5) What is your next project?

I always have a few things cooking. A book of essays. A screenplay about a close friend of mine who had a very romantic life. And a novel about a couple on vacation that goes haywire.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  • What are your thoughts on the structure of the book? What did you think of the alternating narrators? Is there a true protagonist? If so, who?
  • Why does Lana try so hard to keep Tracee from trouble while Lana seems to relish finding it for herself?
  • The novel touches on many themes, including divinity, redemption and forgiveness. Which did you feel was the most important?
  • How do the women change and evolve throughout the novel? Are there particular moments in the story that lead to their transformations?
  • What do you think is next for Lana at the end of the book? If Marcel could speak, would he deem her cured?
  • What exactly is it that Marcel offers Rita and Lana? Is it his refusal to judge them or his ability to listen? Do you believe there is something divine or magical about him?
  • While Rita and Lana find a higher power in Marcel, Tracee finds strength in Tim and his “Theory of One.” Do you believe that Tracee has grown enough for this relationship to be successful, or is her attraction to Tim doomed by her dependent nature?
  • How did the male characters benefit through their connection to Marcel? What role did he play in their worlds? How did they change?
  • Why were Tracee and Rita able to find happiness in a small town? Why did Lana need to move on? Do you wish the women had remained together?
  • Tracee and Lana are troubled by the idea of Rita’s departure. How was Rita an integral part of their lives?
  • The poem “The Highway Man” is referenced by Rita on multiple occasions. What is the significance of the poem to her? She sees Tracee as Bess and calls Tim the Highway Man, but makes no connection to herself. Which character do you think Rita would be?
  • Many of the characters seem to be caged by something in their lives. What is holding each of them back from reaching their full potential?
  • Tracee’s view of Marcel’s confinement is different than Rita and Lana’s. Why do you think she feels this way?
  • Lions are sometimes symbolic of bravery, nobility and strength. Is that what the author intended here?
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    I loved this book! I picked it up on a whim when I needed a qui

    I loved this book! I picked it up on a whim when I needed a quick read that was not too heavy and would draw me in quickly. The back cover was so intriguing that I couldn't resist. It is funny, whimsical, and makes you truly care about each character. I'm a slow reader, yet I finished this book in about 3 sittings. The author weaves in the characters past history to help you understand the conflicts in the present, and moves the characters through revelations and redemption and new found love. The relationships developed among the characters are unique and endearing. It is one of those feel good stories with an ending that is hopeful and tied up with a nice bow!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 15, 2012

    Great Book

    The Lion Is In is one of those wonderful books that you will fly through in a short time. The adventures of three women,on the run begin when they find themselves stuck in a small North Carolina town and working in a bar that houses a lion named Marcel (yes, a real lion). This majestic king of the jungle has a mystical and wise sense about him. Lana, Tracee, and Rita, each have their own struggles that we learn of that have led to them to being on the run, but through their relationships with each other and Marcel, over time each of the women begins to heal the wounds of their pasts and find a new road to travel in life. The Lion Is In starts off as a whimsical, joy-ride of a book fueled by Ephron-style humor but by the final page, the deep meaning about the power we have to change the course of our lives and the power of the human and animal spirit to rebound will touch you deep in your heart and bring a smile to your face.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2013

    Very good!

    Very thought-provoking book, enjoyed it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 25, 2013

    Don't waste your money!

    While there were some cute passages in this book, on the whole I would say it is sophomoric at best, and ridiculous at worst. I think anyone beyond their 20's would agree with me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 21, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    3.5/5 I'm always interested in the origins of a book - how do wr

    3.5/5
    I'm always interested in the origins of a book - how do writers come up with their ideas? Does something specific spark that first line? In Delia Ephron's case the answer is yes......

    "This book happened because of an anxiety attack. I was worried about something… something that I knew wasn’t going to be resolved for a while, and I thought how can I ever get through this? And that night when I went to sleep, I had a dream. A most vivid dream about three women and a lion. When I woke up, I wondered for a second if what I dreamed was real. Then I knew it was my next novel."

    Lana and Tracee (who is wearing a wedding dress) pull over to the side of the road with a flat tire. And along comes Rita, calmly walking down the side of the highway, on her way to - well, she doesn't really know where. Rita helps fix the tire and accepts a ride to wherever the young women are headed. The trip ends in North Carolina when the old Mustang breaks down again. Between the three of them, they have little money, no clothes, no anything. So, they break into a shabby looking roadhouse for the night. And discover that the name of the bar - The Lion - is, in fact reality based - there is a huge old lion in a cage inside. And so begins The Lion is In.

    I was engaged right away - I wanted to know the reasons behind that wedding dress and the older woman walking alone on a highway. A lion in a bar promised quirky and Ephron delivered on that promise.

    Each of the characters (including the supporting cast)is flawed or wounded to a certain degree. But they're all trying to find their footing and break away from what's holding them back. And segue to the lion - Marcel -yes, that's his name - though caged, is the catalyst and the impetus that sets them free.

    The Lion is In was a quick, fun read for me. Yes, you have to suspend disbelief a few times, but if you're in the mood for a heartwarming, feel-good read, this is a good bet. Nothing too deep, although I did like Tim's Theory of One. " All you need is one person to make a difference in your life. You can have the world's most awful life....but if one person believes in you, you'll be okay."

    Delia Ephron is also a screenwriter - remember that movie - You've Got Mail? The Lion is In has the same feel - lots of off-centre, quirky characters (Tim is a favourite), odd situations and the hope that it will all work out in the end. I could easily see this book being made into a movie.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2012

    Outstanding !!

    Great read. Fun, gripping, and touching. Fast read that has depth and little side stories that give it holding power. Highly recommend if you like animals and the human spirit.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)