The Little Blue Reasoning Book: 50 Powerful Principles for Clear and Effective Thinking (3rd Edition) [NOOK Book]

Overview

For Reasoning Aficionados From All Walks of Life!

This guidebook addresses one of the most critical yet seldom taught skills. Reasoning skills help us make sense of the world, including how to better make decisions, tackle opportunities, evaluate claims, and solve problems. Interwoven within the book’s five sections – Perception & Mindset, Decision Making, Creative Thinking, Analyzing Arguments, and Mastering Logic – reader’s will discover...
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The Little Blue Reasoning Book: 50 Powerful Principles for Clear and Effective Thinking (3rd Edition)

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Overview

For Reasoning Aficionados From All Walks of Life!

This guidebook addresses one of the most critical yet seldom taught skills. Reasoning skills help us make sense of the world, including how to better make decisions, tackle opportunities, evaluate claims, and solve problems. Interwoven within the book’s five sections – Perception & Mindset, Decision Making, Creative Thinking, Analyzing Arguments, and Mastering Logic – reader’s will discover 50 reasoning tips that summarize the common themes behind classic reasoning problems and situations. Appendixes contain summaries of fallacious reasoning, analogies, trade-offs, and a review of critical reading skills. A wealth of examples, charts, and insightful problems makes The Little Blue Reasoning Book an invaluable guide for any individual wanting to further sharpen his or her thinking skills.

Enjoy the benefits of your own self-paced reasoning course:
*Gain insights into the four classic mindsets and how each influences one’s outlook.
*Make better decisions by framing problems with quantitative tools.
*Employ creative thinking to bypass “roadblocks” and unlock novel solutions.
*Evaluate claims by challenging the strength of key assumptions.
*Use logic to break down arguments in a clear, easy-to-understand manner.
*Review the 10 classic trade-offs to speed recognition of core issues.
*Read with added clarity, whether your goal involves pleasure or profit.
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Editorial Reviews

Dr. William A. McEachern, author, award-winning teacher, and founding editor of The Teaching Economist
“A wonderful work that shows how reasoning is challenging, yet engaging, rewarding and fun. Because reasoning involves people, it is an art as well as a science. And to remind ourselves just why it’s not always easy to mix the two, we owe a cheerful salute to Nobel prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann who observed: ‘Think how hard physics would be if particles could think.’”
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016530284
  • Publisher: Maven Publishing
  • Publication date: 1/1/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 294
  • Sales rank: 682,548
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Brandon Royal is an award-winning writer whose educational authorship includes The Little Red Writing Book, The Little Gold Grammar Book, and The Little Green Math Book. During his tenure working in Hong Kong for US-based Kaplan Educational Centers – a Washington Post subsidiary and the largest test-preparation organization in the world – Brandon honed his theories of teaching and education and developed a set of key learning “principles” to help define the basics of writing, grammar, math, and reasoning. A Canadian by birth and graduate of the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, his interest in writing began after completing writing courses at Harvard University. Since then he has authored a dozen books and reviews of his books have appeared in Time Asia magazine, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal of America, Midwest Book Review, The Asian Review of Books, Choice Reviews Online, Asia Times Online, and About.com. Brandon is a five-time winner of the International Book Awards, a five-time gold medalist at the President’s Book Awards, as well as a winner of the Global eBook Awards, the USA Book News “Best Book Awards,” and recipient of the 2011 “Educational Book of the Year” award as presented by the Book Publishers Association of Alberta.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 30, 2010

    An excellent choice for anyone who thinks or wants to

    This is the kind of book I wish I had in high school. No one teaches the art of thinking but every once in a while we have to give our brains a tune-up. One of my favorite topics is how the four classic mindsets influence how we view the world. I love how this single problem says so much about the way we think and how every answer choice is both right and wrong. Take the following excerpt for example:

    Which of the following five sports is least like the other four?

    A) Baseball
    B) Cricket
    C) Soccer (Football)
    D) Golf
    E) Ice Hockey

    This is indeed an interesting question highlighting the possibility of multiple solutions and subjective interpretations. Not only would such a question never be chosen for an IQ test, but it also hints at ambiguity so often present whenever individuals make choices.

    Most people find themselves choosing choice D insofar as golf is primarily an individual sport while the other sports are team sports. Golf is also the only sport here in which a lower score beats a higher score. Some pontificate whether the distinction rests on the degree to which golf is more mental than physical while the other four sports are more physical than mental. Certainly physical speed is of obvious importance in all sports except golf.

    Choice E is likely the next most popular answer. Ice hockey is essentially a winter sport, whereas the other sports are typically played in warmer weather. In ice hockey, players use skates, whereas in the other sports players use sporting shoes. Ice hockey is also played with a puck, the others, with balls! (Pun intended < ice hockey is notorious for being one of the roughest of sports and the only one listed above where you can legitimately ³check² another player.)

    A number of people view soccer (football) as least like the other three. After all, the other sports are played with stick-like objects: golf requires clubs, irons, and putters; ice hockey requires sticks, and baseball and cricket require bats. Football (soccer) also is played with an air-filled object, not a solid ball or puck.

    People who choose choice A point to the fact that baseball has no true world championship < the ³World Series² is an American phenomenon. Choice B (cricket) represents a sport that is played primarily in Commonwealth countries.

    Every answer choice is both right and wrong! In summary, there are at least four distinct ways in which individuals draw broad contrasts among these different sports. Some people tend to focus first on the number of people who play the sport (individual vs. team sport), some focus on the speed with which each sport is played (walking vs. running), some focus on the objects used to play the sport (puck vs. ball, inflatable object vs. non-inflatable object, stick-like object vs. non-stick-like object), while others see these sports in the context of when (winter vs. summer, cold weather vs. warm weather) or where they are played (within a particular country or region).

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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