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The Little Book of Likes: Social Media for Small (and Very Small) Nonprofits
     

The Little Book of Likes: Social Media for Small (and Very Small) Nonprofits

5.0 1
by Erik Hanberg
 

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The Little Book of Likes is dedicated to helping small (and very small) nonprofits build an audience on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter.

This short guide leads Executive Directors and nonprofit marketing managers through the ins and outs of a simple social media strategy that is effective and sustainable. With real-world practical advice, it

Overview

The Little Book of Likes is dedicated to helping small (and very small) nonprofits build an audience on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter.

This short guide leads Executive Directors and nonprofit marketing managers through the ins and outs of a simple social media strategy that is effective and sustainable. With real-world practical advice, it recognizes that nonprofit managers usually have better things to be doing than updating Facebook.

Like The Little Book of Gold, it was written specifically for small nonprofits as a "road map" to the often confusing and changing world of social media.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780982714553
Publisher:
Gold Book Development
Publication date:
04/01/2013
Pages:
108
Sales rank:
755,298
Product dimensions:
5.06(w) x 7.81(h) x 0.22(d)

Meet the Author

Based on his years of nonprofit fundraising and leadership, Hanberg published The Little Book of Gold, a fundraising guide for small (and very small) nonprofits.

When he was just 23, Erik Hanberg was hired to run a non-profit arts organization with an annual budget just over $600,000. Two years later, he had increased the budget to $800,000, and increasing fundraising more than 400%.

Since then he has worked in development at multi-million dollar non-profit, and has volunteered on many boards.

He was most recently the Executive Director of a small civic non-profit and currently sits on the distribution committee for a foundation that gives away more than $200,000 a year.

In 2013 he published The Little Book of Likes, a social media guide for small and (and very small) nonprofits based on his social media and marketing experience for nonprofits, small businesses, and his own election to public office in 2011.

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The Little Book of Likes: Social Media for Small (and Very Small) Nonprofits 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
wtneary More than 1 year ago
What's useful about this book is that it is very practical. The author starts from the point of view of a very small nonprofit, and retains a reasonable and measured voice throughout. Most social media books are written by people who promise breathless wonders from social media. There’s almost an effort to convey some shame: “there’s something wrong with you if you don’t take my advice; you’re missing all the excitement! Breathless breathless etc etc.” But Hanberg has lived the life of a small nonprofit staffer and stays consistent and reasonable throughout the book. If you know someone who has anything to do with a nonprofit’s use of social media, I’d suggest giving the book to them, even if you have to say, “I’m sure you already know everything in here, but it never hurts to read more” or something tactful like that. As someone involved in corporate social responsibility at a tech company,  I work regularly with at least 200 nonprofits a year. Maybe 20 are practicing the holistic, effective approach that Hanberg describes in the book. There is enormous potential out there. Hanberg  begins by encouraging the person to choose a reasonable goal, not one created by an overeager volunteer or donor or a social media consultant or “expert.” He holds someone’s hand as they explore blogging, Twitter, Facebook, and email newsletters. Here again, the book is wise because too many groups are putting all their hopes on one format, such as Facebook. That’s great for Facebook, but not necessarily the way the nonprofit is going to get donors or volunteers. In fact, as the book describes, you want to have multiple approaches. The people who figure that out are then often scared away by what they think will be the workload. Hanberg encourages people to keep things simple and just do what makes sense for your organization. Along the way, he provides countless tips on HOW to keep things simple, HOW to decide what’s right for the group and more important, for you, and HOW to calibrate and weigh the effectiveness of your efforts. If the book has a down side, it’s that the book is short. I guess that’s also a plus, but it could have used more information on what to do when something goes wrong, like when a psycho or eccentric takes you on in social media. Maybe the author didn’t want to scare people away. There’s certainly plenty of advice available online on the topic. There’s also the problem that some very, very small nonprofits that I know of even in my area have staff who can’t write in a conventional way. They could use some coaching on how to incorporate volunteers into trying to do all Hanberg describes. But the big win is that the book said, with an economy of words, exactly what I  would say to about 180 nonprofits in my area about how to achieve their potential through social media tools. You can’t go wrong getting “The Little Book of Likes” if you’re in this field, or want to help someone who is.