The Little Green Math Book: 30 Powerful Principles for Building Math and Numeracy Skills

Overview

For Math Aficionados From All Walks of Life!

The Little Green Math Book reads like a collection of math recipes to help us blend problems, principles, and approaches in creating our own lineup of splendid math cuisine. The book's four chapters include: (1) Basic Numeracy Ingredients, (2) Wonderful Math Recipes, (3) Favorite Numeracy Dishes, and (4) Special Math Garnishments. Along with 30 of the most fundamental, recurring math principles and rules, you’ll find a three-tier ...

See more details below
Paperback
$13.32
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$14.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $6.01   
  • New (7) from $13.18   
  • Used (3) from $6.01   
The Little Green Math Book: 30 Powerful Principles for Building Math and Numeracy Skills (3rd Edition)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.99
BN.com price

Overview

For Math Aficionados From All Walks of Life!

The Little Green Math Book reads like a collection of math recipes to help us blend problems, principles, and approaches in creating our own lineup of splendid math cuisine. The book's four chapters include: (1) Basic Numeracy Ingredients, (2) Wonderful Math Recipes, (3) Favorite Numeracy Dishes, and (4) Special Math Garnishments. Along with 30 of the most fundamental, recurring math principles and rules, you’ll find a three-tier system to rate the difficulty level of all problems -- one chili (“mild”), two chilies (“hot”), and three chilies (“very hot”).

Fine-tune your numerical mindset with a quantitative review that serves as a refresher course and as a tool for perceiving math in a new way. Whether you’re a high school or college student, test-prep candidate, or working professional, this book’s wealth of explanations and insights makes it a perfect learning companion.

Enjoy the benefits of your own self-paced math course:

*Contains 120 all-star problems to help readers discover the secrets of basic math.

*Develop a feel for how numbers behave and what makes math problems tick.

*Learn to solve equations by translating math into words and thinking conceptually.

*Watch for pitfalls when working with percentage increase and decrease.

*Use simple math to solve “business” scenarios involving price, cost, volume, profit, and break-even, as well as how to calculate markup versus margin and efficiency.

*Be able to glance at graphs and grasp their underlying meaning.

*Understand correlation: weak or strong, positive or negative, linear or nonlinear.

*Gain a newfound confidence with an increased competency with numbers.

Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

Rick Frishman
This book brilliantly shows the structure and subtlety of basic math. Math is a global language that knows no borders and opens opportunities for us all. (Rick Frishman, author, speaker, and media expert; treasurer and secretary for the Dr. Mark Victor Hansen Foundation, "literacy to end poverty")
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781897393505
  • Publisher: Maven Publishing
  • Publication date: 3/15/2010
  • Pages: 282
  • Sales rank: 309,910
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Meet the Author

Brandon Royal (CPA, MBA) is an award-winning writer whose educational authorship includes The Little Blue Reasoning Book, The Little Red Writing Book, The Little Gold Grammar Book, and The Little Purple Probability Book. During his tenure working in Hong Kong for US-based Kaplan Educational Centers – a Washington Post subsidiary and the largest test-preparation organization in the world – Brandon honed his theories of teaching and education and developed a set of key learning “principles” to help define the basics of writing, grammar, math, and reasoning. A Canadian by birth and graduate of the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, his interest in writing began after completing writing courses at Harvard University. Since then he has authored a dozen books and reviews of his books have appeared in Time Asia magazine, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal of America, Midwest Book Review, The Asian Review of Books, Choice Reviews Online, Asia Times Online, and About.com. Brandon is a five-time winner of the International Book Awards, a five-time gold medalist at the President’s Book Awards, as well as a winner of the Global eBook Awards, the USA Book News “Best Book Awards,” and recipient of the 2011 “Educational Book of the Year” award as presented by the Book Publishers Association of Alberta.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 5, 2011

    "Shiny green gem"

    The green math book is a gem. I can only wonder why these concepts are not taught like this in high school. This book gives you the math principle and then problems to support that principle. That's it. Here's the opening quiz on the kind of things it covers. (They're true/false questions...just imagine though you're doing them without the answers right in front of you... ;-) Quiz 1. If the ratio of females to males at a business conference is 1:2, then the percentage of people who are female at this conference is 50%. False. The percentage of people who are female at this conference is or 33%, not 50%. See tip #13, chapter 1. 2. For a given product, markup is always a smaller percentage than margin. False. For a given product, markup is always larger than margin. See tip #18, chapter 3. 3. A couple charged $132 on their credit card to pay for a meal while dining out. This $132 figure included a 20% tip which was paid on top of the price of the meal, which already included a sales tax of 10%. The actual price of the meal before tax and tip was $92.40. False. The cost of the meal before tax and tip was $100. Calculation: ($132/1.2)/1.1 = $100. See tip #14, chapter 2. 4. Ratios are useful tools that tell us some­thing about actual size or value. False. Ratios tell us nothing about actual size or value; they tell us instead about relative size or value. See tip #11, chapter 2. 5. Multiplying a number by 1.2 is the same as dividing that same number by 0.8. False. Multiplying a number by 1.2 is the same as dividing the number by the reciprocal of 1.2, which is 0.83, not 0.8. Case in point: $100 multiplied by 1.2 is the same as $100 divided by 0.83. See tip #16, chapter 2. 6. Break-even occurs exactly where profit equals total fixed costs. False. Break-even occurs exactly where variable revenue (sales revenue less variable costs) equals total fixed costs. See tip #21, chapter 3. 7. A store item that has been discounted first by 20% and then by 30% is now selling at 50% of its original price. False. The store item is now selling for a 44% discount, or 56% of its original price. For example, $100 less 20% equals $80, and $80 less 30% equals $56. A $44 discount on $100 is 44%. The trap here is that you can't add (or subtract) the percentages of different wholes. See tip #6, chapter 1. 8. A fast-food vendor registered 100 individual sales during the intermission at a sporting event. The vendor sold 60 hamburgers and 35 hot dogs, and 20 people made purchases which did not include hamburgers or hotdogs. Based on this information, we can conclude that 25 people bought both hamburgers and hot dogs. False. Fifteen people bought both hamburgers and hotdogs, as calculated using the formula below. See tip #1, chapter 1. Hamburgers + Hotdogs - Both + Neither = Total 60 + 35 - x + 20 = 100 x = 15 9. If product A is selling for 20% more than product B, then the ratio of product A to product B is 100% to 80%. False. If product A is selling for 20% more than product B, then the ratio of product A to product B is 120% to 100%. See tip #15, chapter 2. 10. Data with a high standard deviation is "bunched." Data with a low standard deviation is more "spread out." False. Data with a high standard deviation is spread out. Data with a low standard deviation is bunched. See tip #29, chapter 4.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)