The Little Skyscraper

The Little Skyscraper

5.0 1
by Scott Santoro
     
 
The little skyscraper didn't always seem so little. At one glorious time he was the tallest and most impressive building in the entire city. People traveled from near and far to take in the view from his observation deck and pass the time in his pretty little park. But as time passed and the city grew and grew, people forgot about the little skyscraper. His bright,

Overview

The little skyscraper didn't always seem so little. At one glorious time he was the tallest and most impressive building in the entire city. People traveled from near and far to take in the view from his observation deck and pass the time in his pretty little park. But as time passed and the city grew and grew, people forgot about the little skyscraper. His bright, shiny spire became dull and tarnished, and his beautiful park was turned into a parking lot. Then, just when his own future looked darkest, the little skyscraper learns that he hadn't been forgotten. And all it took was the determination of an old friend to change the minds of an entire city.

Author Biography: Scott Santoro has worked on many of the most successful animated films of our time. He was head of animation for Disney's The Lion King, was part of the story team for DreamWorks' The Prince of Egypt, and is currently at work on DreamWorks' Spirit, Stallion of the Cimarron.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this chipper, if saccharine, historic preservation fable, a skyscraper (with hybrid features that resemble the Chrysler and the Empire State Buildings) faces destruction until an architect who fell in love with the edifice as a child rallies the city to save it. The boy, Jack, who "look[s] up to the little skyscraper," stands on a corner with his parents as vintage cars drive by and The Fountainhead plays at the cinema across the street. Later, he grows up to fight City Hall on the building's behalf. Despite the simplistic, old-fashioned text, Santoro (Isaac the Ice Cream Truck) draws on his experience as an animator to create a breezy, cinematic perspective and a heightened sense of space (though the book's overlong vertical format may present shelving challenges). He captures both the exhilarating bustle and growth of a metropolis, as well as the sense of menace that the ever-encroaching urban canyon represents to the beleaguered building. The artist makes the most of the little skyscraper's two cathedral-window eyes and mouth to communicate emotions, from joy to chagrin as well as an attack of vertigo ("Sometimes even the little skyscraper got dizzy from looking down"). Even youngest readers will get the heavy-handed message that when something wonderful from the past is preserved, everybody stands tall. All ages. (Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
There is a feeling of stepping back in time when you pick up this book—the illustrations are simple paintings, the buildings all have faces, the cars all have fins. Santoro tells the story of a skyscraper who dominated the city with his fine limestone facade, gold spire and silver trim. People came from all over to look at the city from his observation deck. However, as time passes, other buildings that are much taller than him begin to take over the blocks and the little skyscraper begins to show signs of age. When a sign appears announcing his demolition, an architect who grew up loving the skyscraper rallies for its preservation as an historical landmark. The building is saved and restored to the original glory. 2001, Price Stern Sloan, $12.99. Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer: Carol Lynch

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780843176773
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
10/01/2001
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 14.88(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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The Little Skyscraper 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book for reminding each of us the importance of preserving those things from our past that enrich our lives today, that make us who we are. It is especially appropos given the unity and spirit that has been ignited among the American people by the World Trade Center incident. A heart-warming book in troubling times to read and share with young ones just beginning to learn life lessons!