The Littlest Owl

The Littlest Owl

by Caroline Pitcher, Tina Macnaughton
     
 


Deep inside a willow tree, three newly hatched owlets curiously examine the fourth, quiet egg. Is there an owl in there, they wonder. When at last the fourth owlet struggles free, he doesn't look much like the others. Dumpy, small, and downy white, he is left behind while his siblings learn to fly. No matter how hard he tries, he can't quite do it. "I will," he… See more details below

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Overview


Deep inside a willow tree, three newly hatched owlets curiously examine the fourth, quiet egg. Is there an owl in there, they wonder. When at last the fourth owlet struggles free, he doesn't look much like the others. Dumpy, small, and downy white, he is left behind while his siblings learn to fly. No matter how hard he tries, he can't quite do it. "I will," he says. "Just you wait and see!" Will the littlest owl ever grow big and strong enough to fly from the tree? From the illustrator of five Book Sense Children's Picks comes the perfect story for any child who is a little nervous about venturing too far from home.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

PreS-K- Poor Four, the runt of the owl clutch, is the last to hatch and may never catch up with his siblings. But when a storm threatens his family's willow tree home, he is finally able to fly. Four's story of perseverance and hope is told in warm, rhythmic prose and supported by lush pastel drawings of fluffy, wide-eyed owlets and dense forest backgrounds. Although Pitcher shows some of the owlet's day-to-day frustrations (like being crushed in the nest or being last to find a worm), readers never fear for him-he never worries himself. When the storm comes and his siblings flee, there's little doubt that he will fly or find a safe warm place to wait it out. Despite the predictability, young children will find Four's story reassuring.-Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC

Kirkus Reviews
Four white eggs lie in the nest in the willow tree. Three hatch into owlets, who wait for the last one to make its appearance. When he finally emerges, Four is "so dumpy and small, a downy white ball." One, Two and Three gobble up the food, grow quickly and soon learn to fly. But none of that bothers little Four, who scratches in the dirt to find his own food and never gives up trying to fly despite repeated failure. His determination and hard work pay off when a storm strikes the forest and threatens to crack their home in two. Like The Little Engine That Could, Four gathers himself, fights the wind and finally flies. Filled with greens, browns and blues, Macnaughton's artwork evokes the forest where the adorably fluffy and realistic owlets live. Four's relentless can-do attitude flies in the face of actual childhood psychology, however. While a positive message about varied developmental speed is always welcome, Leo the Late Bloomer remains the more authentic and emotionally satisfying way to meet this need. (Picture book. 3-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561486144
Publisher:
Skyhorse Publishing
Publication date:
06/28/2008
Pages:
28
Product dimensions:
10.40(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
2 - 7 Years

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