The Local Boys: Hometown Players for the Cincinnati Reds

Overview


The Local Boys by Joe and Jack Heffron tells the stories of men who achieved the boyhood dream of playing for the hometown team. From Ethan Allen to Don Zimmer, they’re all here, including Charlie “Bushel Basket” Gould, who played on the first team in 1869 to Junior Griffey, soon to be a first-ballot Hall of Famer. Alongside big-name stars like Dave Parker and Buddy Bell, fans will find those like Eddie Hunter, who played only one inning in 1933, never got to bat, and never fielded a ball. Every player receives ...
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The Local Boys: Hometown Players for the Cincinnati Reds

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Overview


The Local Boys by Joe and Jack Heffron tells the stories of men who achieved the boyhood dream of playing for the hometown team. From Ethan Allen to Don Zimmer, they’re all here, including Charlie “Bushel Basket” Gould, who played on the first team in 1869 to Junior Griffey, soon to be a first-ballot Hall of Famer. Alongside big-name stars like Dave Parker and Buddy Bell, fans will find those like Eddie Hunter, who played only one inning in 1933, never got to bat, and never fielded a ball. Every player receives a one- or two-page profile, many of which are based on original interviews with the players or surviving family members. Going beyond statistics, each profile brings the player to life through stories that have never before been told in print. An indispensible look at Cincinnati baseball history, The Local Boys makes an ideal gift for any Reds fan.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781578605538
  • Publisher: Clerisy Press
  • Publication date: 4/15/2014
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 177,972
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author


A long-time umpire, Joe Heffron has an encyclopedic knowledge of the Cincinnati Reds. An SPJA award winner for sports writing, Jack Heffron has edited many books on baseball and other sports. Both live in Cincinnati. Chris Welsh is in his 22nd season as Cincinnati Reds color analyst on Fox Sports Ohio. A former major league pitcher born and raised in Greater Cincinnati, he now lives in Walton, KY.
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Read an Excerpt


“Admiral” Schlei

January 12, 1878 – January 24, 1958
Major League Career
1904 - 1911
Time as a Red
1904 - 1908
Position
catcher and first base

On June 18, 1907, Admiral Schlei became the first Reds catcher to wear shinguards, putting them on for the ninth inning of a game against the New York Giants in Cincinnati. Like most pioneers, Schlei took some abuse, as fans jeered the newfangled equipment. The Giants’ Roger Bresnahan had debuted shinguards earlier that season, and most catchers eventually followed his lead.

George “Admiral” Schlei grew up in the East End, attending St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church on Eastern Avenue (now Riverside Drive) and St. Xavier High School, then located downtown. The son of German immigrants, Schlei played ball during his youth, mainly as a catcher, says his grandson Bill. After a few years in the minors, he came to the Reds on April 24, 1904, at age 26. He played seven years to the day in the majors. Not much of a hitter, he compiled a tepid .237/.307/.296, though in 1906 he led the Reds in RBI (54) and tied for the lead in homeruns (4). In the deadball era, a catcher’s main concern was fielding and keeping runners from stealing, and Schlei was considered a very able backstop. The Reds traded him after the 1908 season to St. Louis, who traded him the same day to the Giants, who sent him to the minors early in 1911 and he never made it back to The Show. He ended his career at the age of 38 in 1916 with the Memphis Chicks.

He lived in Cincinnati until virulent anti-German sentiment swept the country as
America entered World War I. He then moved to Huntington, West Virginia, where he lived for the rest of his life, working in the printing business until his mid-70s. He remained a Reds fan, says his grandson, who recalls Admiral listening announcer Waite Hoyt on the radio—even when they were televised.

By then people knew him simply as George. How he came by ‘Admiral’ remains a mystery. Most sources say it came from the similarity of his last name to a hero of the Spanish-American War, Admiral Winfield Scott Schley. George told his grandson that he got the nickname while filling in as a coach for the Navy. However he got it, he was called ‘Admiral’ during his career—except, perhaps, on the day the crowd made fun of the contraptions he’d strapped on his shins. He heard a few even more colorful names on that day.

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Foreword by Chris Welsh

Introduction

A Brief History of Local Reds

Ethan Allen
Linwood “King” Bailey
Clarence “Kid” Baldwin
Skeeter Barnes
Bob Barton
Jim Beckman
Buddy Bell
Mike Bell
Larry Benton
Todd Benzinger
Jim Blackburn
Jim Bolger
Amos Booth
John “Honest Jack” Boyle
Cornelius “Neal” Brady
Jim Brosnan
Mike Burke
Jack Bushelman
Charlie Case
Bob Clark
Billy Clingman
Pierce “Percy” Coleman
Lorenzo “Ren” Deagle
Charles “Dory” Dean
John Dolan
Charles “Red” Dooin
Bill Doran
Leon Durham
Norman “Kid” Elberfeld
Buck Ewing
Maury Fisher
Cornelius Flynn
Hank Gastright
Bob Geary
Charles Gould
Ken Griffey Jr.
Emil Haberer
John “Chink” Heileman
Christian “Crese” Heisman
Bill Hobbs
George Hogriever
Thomas Howard
Miller Huggins
Rudy Hulswitt
Eddie Hunter
Bill Irwin
Stuart “Larry” Jacobus
Scott Klingenbeck
Ralph Kraus
Brian Koelling
Al “Moose” Lakeman
Barry Larkin
Stephen Larkin
Mark Lewis
Larry Luebbers
Louis “Red” Lutz
Lee Magee
Charles “Lefty” Marr
Billy McCool
George Miller
Robert Mitchell
Dick Murphy
Dan Neville
Al Niehaus
Chris Nichting
Jack Niemes
Joe Nuxhall
Ron Oester
Claude Osteen
Dave Parker
George Pechiney
James (Icicle) Reeder
Long John Reilly
Pete Rose
Pete Rose Jr.
Jeff Russell
Admiral Schlei
Gene Schott
Dick Scott
Scott Service
Chris Sexton
Gus Shallix
Jimmy Sherlin
Eddie Sicking
John (Chick) Smith
Joe Sommer
Clarence Stephens
Jake Stenzel
Ricky Stone
Jack Sutthoff
Len Swormstedt
Jesse Tannehill
Kent Tekulve
Eddie Tiemeyer
Harry (Farmer) Vaughn
Clyde Vollmer
Herm Wehmeier
John (Podge) Weihe
Chris Welsh
Bill Whitrock
Wild Bill Widner
Dale Williams
Orville Woodruff
Don Zimmer

Acknowledgments
Sources

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