The Long-Haired Girl: A Chinese Legend

Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $155.72   
  • Used (6) from $0.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$155.72
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(266)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$195.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(149)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
In this fine retelling of a Chinese legend, a terrible drought has come to the land near the Lei-Gong Mountains. When Ah-Mei discovers a secret spring of water as "sweet as pear juice," Lei-Gong, the God of Thunder, threatens her with death if she breathes a word of her discovery to anyone. Ah-Mei withers under the burden of this knowledge, longing to tell the villagers of the water source that could save their lives. Her raven hair fades and worry ravages her beauty. Finally, the sight of a suffering old man proves more than she can bear. In dramatic detail, Rappaport (previously teamed with Yang for The Journey of Meng) describes how the girl saves the village despite the risk of death, and then receives help from the once-suffering old man to thwart the vengeful Thunder God. Vivid writing captures Ah-Mei's courage, presenting her dilemma as tangible and relevant. Woodcuts complement the prose. With bold lines set against delicate backdrops in pastel colors, the art, while pleasingly simple, conveys considerable emotion and movement. Especially noteworthy is Yang's attention to costume.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this fine retelling of a Chinese legend, a terrible drought has come to the land near the Lei-Gong Mountains. When Ah-Mei discovers a secret spring of water as ``sweet as pear juice,'' Lei-Gong, the God of Thunder, threatens her with death if she breathes a word of her discovery to anyone. Ah-Mei withers under the burden of this knowledge, longing to tell the villagers of the water source that could save their lives. Her raven hair fades and worry ravages her beauty. Finally, the sight of a suffering old man proves more than she can bear. In dramatic detail, Rappaport (previously teamed with Yang for The Journey of Meng) describes how the girl saves the village despite the risk of death, and then receives help from the once-suffering old man to thwart the vengeful Thunder God. Vivid writing captures Ah-Mei's courage, presenting her dilemma as tangible and relevant. Woodcuts complement the prose. With bold lines set against delicate backdrops in pastel colors, the art, while pleasingly simple, conveys considerable emotion and movement. Especially noteworthy is Yang's attention to costume. Ages 4-8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Uma Krishnaswami
In a time when Lei-gong, the God of Thunder, is unrelenting and will not send rain, young Ah-mei finds the magic turnip that marks his secret spring. Lei-gong appears and warns her under threat of death not to reveal it to her people. But her silence weighs heavy on Ah-mei's soul, turning her pale and her long hair white. Finally, she cannot stand it any longer, and leads the villagers to the spring. In the manner of all mythology, the plot takes a few twists and turns. Finally, with the help of an old man, Ah-mei is saved from the wrath of Lei-gong, and the people are assured of a constant supply of water, even when the capricious god decides to withhold rain. Yang Ming-Yi's woodcuts beautifully illustrate this retold tale.
Children's Literature - Deborah Zink Roffino
The altruistic nature of a young girl saves her village from drought and from the wrath of the Dragon King.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3Exhausted by her constant search for water during an extended drought, Ah-mei barely manages to climb a nearby mountain to find green herbs. There she invokes the wrath of the Thunder God by accidentally discovering his sweet spring. Because the angry god threatens to kill her if she reveals its location, Ah-mei agonizes for a month while she watches her mother and the other villagers suffer, knowing she could save them. The desperate straits of an old man finally convince her to sacrifice her life for the good of others. Her decision does not bring the disasterous consequences she expects, for the old man helps her fool the Thunder God. The creators of The Journey of Meng (Dial, 1991) have served up another well-told, handsomely illustrated traditional tale. In an arresting departure from the softer watercolors of his earlier book, Yang illustrates the text with colored woodblock prints on rice paper, a traditional medium for early and modern Asian art. His carefully composed pictures have an earthy vigor appropriate to this tale rooted in peasant life, yet are capable of great delicacy as they depict the loving relationship of mother to daughter. Ah-mei's flowing hair, the flight of birds, the passage of clouds, all depicted in rich, subtle colors, contribute life and movement to an engaging and satisfying picture book, marred only by its lack of a source note.Margaret A. Chang, North Adams State College, MA
Hazel Rochman
Like Rappaport and Ming-Yi's "Journey of Meng" (1991), this is a story of a brave young woman who is prepared to sacrifice herself for her people. Handsome woodcuts combine with soft-toned watercolors to illustrate a Chinese legend set in a remote village. At a time of devastating drought, Ah-mei discovers a hidden stream of cold, sweet water high in the mountains, but the fearsome God of Thunder threatens to kill her if she tells anyone about it. The drought drags on; Ah-mei dreams of saving her village, even though she would have to die to bring her people water. Her long, shiny black hair turns white. Finally, she can bear it no longer; she brings the people to the secret spring, and they release the waterfall to pour down the mountainside and restore the fields. Then the villagers trick the evil god and save Ah-mei's life. The pictures show that the waves of her long, flowing hair are like the gushing waterfall: the courageous, unselfish hero is part of the flow of nature.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803714120
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/1/1995
  • Edition description: 1st ed
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.90 (w) x 10.94 (h) x 0.46 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)