The Long Path to Nearness: A Contribution to a Corporeal Philosophy of Communication and the Groundwork for an Ethics of Relief

Overview

The Long Path to Nearness takes its place among the recent interdisciplinary work being done at the intersection of philosophy and communication studies. Bringing together Reichian psychoanalysis, the utopian Marxism of Ernst Bloch, and a rigorous phenomenology of communication following Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, Ramsey argues that studies of corporeality are a necessary component of a philosophy of communicative praxis directed toward ethical concerns. Arguing for a return to the body to address questions of ...
See more details below
This Hardcover (New Edition) is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

The Long Path to Nearness takes its place among the recent interdisciplinary work being done at the intersection of philosophy and communication studies. Bringing together Reichian psychoanalysis, the utopian Marxism of Ernst Bloch, and a rigorous phenomenology of communication following Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, Ramsey argues that studies of corporeality are a necessary component of a philosophy of communicative praxis directed toward ethical concerns. Arguing for a return to the body to address questions of ethics, Ramsey demonstrates that the communicative disclosure of worldly possibilities arises out of the conjunction of physical and hermeneutical capabilities of bodies and the material potentiality of situations. It is against this backdrop, which includes a detailed description of communicative praxis in a world destined by technology, that Ramsey develops the groundwork for an "ethics of relief." This study will be of interest to students of Philosophy and Communication Studies, as well as those in Cultural Studies and Sociology, who address theoretical issues concerning discourse, the body, and ethics.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Ramsey (communication studies, Arizona State U.) maintains that postmodern philosophers are in fact radical contributors to the continuing project of the Enlightenment, and he situates his work in this radical endeavor. Asserting that the body is an inescapable component of the practice of communication and that it determines the types and manners of communicative practices, he explains how a corporeal understanding of communication can lead to ethical practices. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781573924504
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books
  • Publication date: 4/28/1998
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 160

Table of Contents

Foreword
Ackonwledgments
1 The Question Concerning Communication 1
2 Our Impatience for Liberty: Approaching Communication from the Point of View of Possibility 12
3 Corporeality, Possibility, and Character Structure 24
4 The Appearance of Communication 39
5 Corporeality and Communication: The Phenomenological Justification of Character Structure 56
6 The Groundwork for an Ethics of Relief 71
7 A Contribution to a Corporeal Philosophy of Communication 88
Appendix What is Enlightened Freedom? An Essay on what Kant Taught Us 121
Bibliography 135
Index 142
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)