The Long Patrol (Redwall Series #10)

( 70 )

Overview

Barradum! Barradum! Barrabubbitybubbityboom! Tamello De Fformelo Tussock wants more than anything to join the Long Patrol, those staunch and stalwart hare warriors who make their home at the top of Salamandastron Mountain. But Tammo, as he is called, is too young and inexperienced. Or is he? Guided by the nomad squirrel Russa, Tammo makes his way to Redwall, where the Long Patrol has gathered to protect their beloved Abbey from the great rat Rapscallions. And as the mighty rats rear their ugly heads and ancient ...
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Overview

Barradum! Barradum! Barrabubbitybubbityboom! Tamello De Fformelo Tussock wants more than anything to join the Long Patrol, those staunch and stalwart hare warriors who make their home at the top of Salamandastron Mountain. But Tammo, as he is called, is too young and inexperienced. Or is he? Guided by the nomad squirrel Russa, Tammo makes his way to Redwall, where the Long Patrol has gathered to protect their beloved Abbey from the great rat Rapscallions. And as the mighty rats rear their ugly heads and ancient Redwall warriors fall, young Tammo learns what life, death and honor really mean as a new generation of Redwall heroes comes to the fore to save their home from evil.

For ages 9 and above.

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Editorial Reviews

Seattle Post-Intelligencer
The medieval world of Redwall Abbey — where gallant mouse warriors triumph over evil invaders — has truly become the stuff of legend.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Jacques sticks to the tried-and-true in the latest installment of the Redwall series. In the declining years of the characters previously featured in Pearls of Lutra, a menacing band of raiders again threatens Redwall Abbey. And once again the good animals of Redwall and Mossflower must join together to fight the invader. A new protagonist, the young hare Tammo, joins the Long Patrol, an outfit charged with the protection of all the animals in Mossflower Wood and fabled for its soldiering; he does well in battle but wants no more of it: "No, I'm not all right, sah. I've seen death!" Love, sparked by an attractive female hare, is more important to him. Meanwhile, at the Abbey, excavations lead to a treasure hunt, like the one found in Lutra though not as integral to the plot. These familiar story lines are seasoned with a few other new characters and groups of animals, notably a wandering female squirrel (who, unfortunately, survives only halfway through). The Painted Ones and the Waterhogs, based on what appear to be popular perceptions of African tribesmen and Native American warriors, also make guest appearances. And of course, there is the familiar roster of animal typesroyal badgers, officer-class hares, greedy but cowardly rats and the country bumpkin moles, who can always be relied upon for a funny "gem of mole logic." The formula, in other words, still works, and the narrative, as usual, is tightly plotted andexcept for the difficult-to-decipher dialects and lengthy descriptions of foodbriskly paced. A feast for the faithful. Ages 12-up. (Feb.)
VOYA - Libby Bergstrom
Jacques's tenth Redwall novel continues to dish up swashbuckling adventure. After Tammo, a young runaway hare, is rescued by the legendary Long Patrol, he joins them on their mission to track down the Rapscallions. This vast vermin army, led by the bloodthirsty Firstblade Damug, is bent on revenge after its defeat at Salamandastron the previous summer. The vermin's goal? To capture Redwall Abbey. Meanwhile, the peaceful creatures of Redwall are in an uproar. The south wall of the Abbey is collapsing. They are in grave danger without the wall to protect them, but until they discover why it is collapsing, they cannot begin to repair it. A vision from Martin the Warrior shows Tammo the crucial role he must play in defending the creatures of Mossflower but the young, inexperienced, runaway hare doubts he can live up to the task. While the Abbey creatures track down the cause of the collapse of the wall, Tammo must infiltrate the Rapscallion camp using courage he did not know he had. As is traditional in the Redwall series, there is a happy ending, but not before some very close calls. Jacques follows his proven formula: violent battles and mouthwatering feasts. However, his descriptive language is crisper than ever, his plot has more intricate twists and turns to draw the reader along, and his numerous characters are appealing. A sure winner with Redwall fans, this tale will also attract new readers to the series. VOYA Codes: 4Q 5P M J (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses, Every YA (who reads) was dying to read it yesterday, Middle School-defined as grades 6 to 8 and Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9).
Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
Tammo is told by his father that he is too young to join the Long Patrol, the perilous guard. His mother, who was a member of that prestigious fighting unit in her youth, understands Tammo's longings and arranges for him to go. Meanwhile, the south wall of Redwall Abbey is disintegrating and it is the duty of the Long Patrol to defend the abbey until the wall is fixed. At the same time, the evil Rapscallion army is working its way inland toward the abbey. Tammo will find himself in the midst of a great battle, but not before the author has adeptly heightened the anticipation. This is the tenth book in the Redwall saga. It can be read independently of the others, but faithful readers who know the history will be happy to discover old friends as well as new. Jacques creates distinctive characters out of common woodland animals. While there are plenty of battle scenes and deaths, readers will see that kindness, goodness, courage and friendship are the important qualities of a hero. Small graphite illustrations of important characters begin each section and chapter. The length of the text and the author's use of dialect will require a sophisticated reader. The marching songs of the troops, the descriptions of the feasts, and words and phrases that roll off the tongue in a playful manner all beg to be shared. I highly recommend this as a read aloud, for adults will enjoy this charming and exciting adventure as well.
Library Journal
Jacques reads his own fanciful story about an adolescent hare who wishes to join the Long Patrol, a militant band of hare soldiers who strive against the evil rat Rapscallion. With complex names such as Tamello De Formelo Tussock, and unusual animal characters, Jacques tells a story of battle, friendship, and leadership. This imaginative story will appeal principally to those who like animal personages in adult fairy tales. While Jacques's solid male voice gives variety and individuality to his characters' voices, he is not always easily understood. As the narrator, his broad Lancashire accent predominates. Overall, it does not make for easy listening. To follow the story and understand the text requires very active listening.-- Carolyn Alexander, Brigadoon Library, Salinas, California
Library Journal
Jacques reads his own fanciful story about an adolescent hare who wishes to join the Long Patrol, a militant band of hare soldiers who strive against the evil rat Rapscallion. With complex names such as Tamello De Formelo Tussock, and unusual animal characters, Jacques tells a story of battle, friendship, and leadership. This imaginative story will appeal principally to those who like animal personages in adult fairy tales. While Jacques's solid male voice gives variety and individuality to his characters' voices, he is not always easily understood. As the narrator, his broad Lancashire accent predominates. Overall, it does not make for easy listening. To follow the story and understand the text requires very active listening.-- Carolyn Alexander, Brigadoon Library, Salinas, California
School Library Journal
Gr 6-8In this latest "Redwall" entry, Tammo, a young hare, becomes a member of a contingent of fighting forest folk who seek to defend the imperiled Redwall Abbey, led by the badger Lady Cregga Rose Eyes. Tammo and his comrades do battle against the Rapscallion foe, whose leader is the evil greatrat, Damug Warfang. Eventually the forces of good meet and clash with their evil enemies in a battle of legendary proportions. Good triumphs, of course, but not before several noble warriors have met their deaths. There is a tremendous amount of violence in this book. The characters maintain some of their animal characteristics, but it is their human qualities that make them either appealing or repugnant. The bad Rapscallions are thoroughly dishonest, traitorous, and cruel. The badgers, mice, hedgehogs, moles, and other assorted creatures that represent goodness may have foibles but they are unremittingly kind and generous. Pen-and-ink thumbnail sketches appear at the head of each chapter and strongly communicate the sense of drama. Some of the creatures, most notably the laboring class of moles, speak in an impossible, jaw-breaking dialect that may slow some readers down a bit; nevertheless, this is a worthy addition to a series that has found a definite niche among fantasy lovers. It breaks no new ground, but it is a satisfying adventure with a comforting, predictable conclusion. Its closing lines pave the way for yet another sequel.Bruce Anne Shook, Mendenhall Middle School, Greensboro, NC
Horn
The tenth book in the Redwall series continues the saga of the woodland creatures' battle to protect Redwall Abbey from the threat of warring vermin. Weaving three parallel storylines together, Jacques effectively builds suspense by frequently switching scenes at the height of the action. When Damug Warfang succeeds his father as Firstblade of all Rapscallions, he leads the army of vicious, seafaring Greatrats inland toward Mossflower Woods. Meanwhile, the peaceable but courageous residents of the Abbey band together to investigate the cause of the sudden disintegration of the south wall. When ancient blueprints reveal the presence of an old castle buried beneath the ramparts, Abbess Tansey, Crakyn the recorder, Diggum Foremole, and two other adventurous creatures descend into the subterranean ruins, where they find both treasure and danger. Above ground, members of the Long Patrol-rabbit warriors who patrol the countryside during times of peace and gather in a formidable army during times of battle-develop a scheme to confront the rascally Rapscallions before they reach the vulnerable abbey. A masterful storyteller, Jacques spins out the plot through dialogue and the characters' interactions rather than heavy narration and description. Both major and minor characters are believable, well-developed individuals, and, as in the other Redwall books, the combination of an absorbing plot, robust characterization, and detailed description make the novel a page-turner.
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
The medieval world of Redwall Abbey -- where gallant mouse warriors triumph over evil invaders -- has truly become the stuff of legend.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780142402450
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/9/2004
  • Series: Redwall Series , #10
  • Edition description: First American Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 161,924
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.06 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.99 (d)

Meet the Author

Brian  Jacques
Brian Jacques
Following in the grand tradition of Watership Down, Brian Jacques’ bestselling Redwall books star animals in medieval England who must protect their home against evil. Equal parts enchanting fantasy and morality tale, these adventure-filled books have captivated readers worldwide.

Biography

The drawings that open the chapters in a Redwall book may look sweet, but Brian Jacques' fantasies are not for the faint of heart. Adventure, peril, betrayal, and downright slaughter abound in these hefty novels about the creatures -- mice, hares, moles, badgers, and sparrows -- who inhabit Redwall Abbey in medieval England.

Brian Jacques has had a life nearly as exciting as that of some of his characters: After dropping out of school in his native Liverpool at the age of 15, he traveled the world as a merchant seaman, visiting ports from America to Asia. Upon returning to England, he held a wide variety of jobs, from railway fireman to boxer among them. In the 1960s, he and his two brothers formed the Liverpool Fishermen, a folksinging group. Jacques also tried his hand as a playwright, producing several stage plays -- Brown Bitter, Wet Nellies, Scouse – about native Liverpudlians.

The Redwall stories, which were to earn him legions of fans, were born out of his time as a volunteer storyteller at the Royal Wavertree School for the Blind in Liverpool. Jacques maintains that his detailed writing style was developed here; he was forced to be as descriptive as possible, so his audience would be able to experience his stories as if they could see. He created the first Redwall story as a gift to the children of the school, but never intended to publish it commercially. Fortunately for his many fans on both sides of the Atlantic, a friend sent his first manuscript to a publisher, and the rousing series took off in England in 1986 and in the U.S. the following year with Redwall.

Jacques takes issue with the notion that his books are "fantasy" fiction, a description that he says "smacks of swords and sorcery and dungeons and dragons. . . . I like to think of my books as old-fashioned adventures that happened ‘Once upon a time, long ago and far away.'"

The novels appeal generally to an audience of nine- to fifteen-year-olds, but have admirers both younger and older. The tales pivot on the conflict between good and evil; good invariably triumphs. Indeed, morality issues are always clear in Jacques' books: cruelty, greed, and avarice are eradicated in all forms; bravery, loyalty, and resourcefulness reap rewards aplenty. When it comes to characters, though, Jacques is less simplistic: Martin the Warrior, who through his courage and cunning rose to become the noblest hero in the land, is given to impetuousness, and the miscreant Cluny has both good and bad sides, a la Long John Silver.

For female readers, the Redwall books can be extra satisfying. His female creatures are as adventurous as the males: they don't faint into their male counterparts' arms, but explore, swashbuckle, and rescue on their own. In Mariel of Redwall (1991), the courageous girl mousechild Mariel, thrown overboard by the Gabool, leader of the evil pirate Searats, exacts her own brand of revenge.

Jacques' usually swift pace sometimes comes to a slogging halt with extraordinarily detailed descriptions of the legendary Redwall feasts, right down to the last acorn and drop of buttercup and honey cordial. But the author is redeemed by his delicate interweaving of subplots, his memorable menagerie, his rollicking sense of adventure, and his ability to transport the reader into an entirely different world, a world that, as one critic for The New York Times put it, "is both an incredible and ingratiating place, one to which readers will doubtless cheerfully return."

Good To Know

Brian Jacques wrote his books in longhand or on a manual typewriter, or, if the weather permits, outdoors.

Despite his success as an author, Jacques continued to broadcast the weekly radio show, Jakestown, that he hosted before he wrote the Redwall books.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      June 15, 1939
    2. Place of Birth:
      Liverpool, England
    1. Date of Death:
      February 5, 2011
    2. Place of Death:
      Liverpool, England
    1. Education:
      St. John’s School, Liverpool, England
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 70 )
Rating Distribution

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(59)

4 Star

(6)

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(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 70 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2005

    THE BEST

    It was great! Tammo is a young hare who wants to join the Long Patrol, but his father would rather not. But he runs away with a squirrel and meets a group of Long Patrol hares. As they travel to Redwall they find out about a vermin army planning to take over Redwall. Just outside the Abbey at the 'Ridge' starts a memorial battle! The only thing that dissapointed me was that they didn't say 'wot wot' enough.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2004

    An outstanding book that is to good to put down

    When I got on the first chapter I could not stop it was so good it was better than Redwall

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2003

    The best of Jacques yet!

    This book is undisputably my favorite of all of Jacques' books. The story is awesome and the characters (except for the villains) are incredibly loveable! This book will make you cry and cheer and it will make you want to read it time and again! If you haven't read this book, especially if you're a fan of Jacques' books, you need to start today!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2013

    EULAILA EULALIA!!!

    two words.awsome book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2013

    Accent wayyy to hard

    ACCENT IS TO HARD

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2013

    Cool

    My fav characters are Corp. Rubbadubb and Pasque. Mostnof the voices of the hares are in english accents and spoken fast. That is a point of reference for americans.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2013

    Eulaaaalllliiiiiaaaa!!!

    I love this series come on

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    If you are a fan of the Redwall Series then you'll love this book. It is by far one of the best books in the Redwall series.

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  • Posted February 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Accent too hard

    If your an American, it is too difficult to follow the accent. It is written like the characters are Scottish (I believe). The story seems good, but it just takes too much work to read this and try to relax.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2008

    Redwaaaaalllllllll!

    Pretty good. A lot like his others but hey, thats part of the jacques appeal. predictably good. Great ending. The battles always get your heart pounding, make you sad, and make you mad. The characters are fun & light-hearted even most of the villians. The food weird, the songs ridiculous, & the story has good smatterings of wisdom & compassion. A good solid book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2007

    The Long Patrol

    When the huge Rapscillian army is invading, it¿s up to one small group of hares to stop them. The Rapscillians decide to invade Mossflower country. A small group of hares learn of this invasion, and they go to Redwall. With Redwall¿s help, the hares meet the Rapscillians in combat. The Rapscillians are defeated, and peace returns to Mossflower. I recommend this book to anyone who likes adventure stories with a lot of action in them. There is a lot of action in The Long Patrol. A lot of the battles are small, like the part where Tammo¿s group of hares chases a band of ferrets while shooting arrows at them. In another battle, a band of rats ambushes Tammo and Russa in the woods. At the end of the story, there is a huge battle. The Rapscillian army of 1000 tries to get up a really big hill while the Redwall army of 300 tries to stop them. It is a very gruesome battle. The Long Patrol has a lot of colorful characters in it. Russa is an expert in nature, and she loves to travel the world. In the beginning of the story, she gets back from a ¿walk around the world.¿ Midge Manycoats is an expert at disguising himself and others. Unless you know he is in a disguise, you would think that is how he looks. At one point he needs to disguise himself and Tammo so they can sabotage the Rapscillians. Rockjaw Grang will stand up to anything that threatens his friends. He fights an entire band of rats by himself, so Tammo and Midge can escape from harm. There are many surprises in The Long Patrol, both good and bad. In the aftermath of a battle, you find out Russa had gotten killed. In another part of the book, the moles dig a tunnel and find an ancient castle beneath the south wall of Redwall Abby. Also, a group of hares are walking in a field when a rainstorm of arrows falls through the sky onto them. The Long Patrol takes you on a journey with a group of hares through war. You will come to really like some of the characters. The story is filled with suspense. I loved this book, and I think many others would love it to.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2007

    great BOOK

    Very nicely writen I recomed it graetly to any one big or small!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2006

    One of Brian Jacques' Best Books The Long Patrol

    Author Brian Jacques Title The Long Patrol Isbn# 0-14-240245-1 358 pgs Publisher Penguin Group Price $7.99 The Long Patrol by Brian Jacques is a book in the Redwall series that tells of Lady Cregga, the lord of Salamandastron. Salamandastron is a huge mountain not too far away from the sea and hold off most sea vermin that plan to take over Mossflower Woods. The lord of Salamandastron has been and always will be a badger. The loyal hares of Salamandastron are ready to take orders and to fight to the death for the badger lord. Besides the hares at Salamandastron there is Camp Tussock which Tamm attends. Tamm plans to join The Long Patrol and become a fighter like his father who runs Camp Tussock. Along the way to Salamandastron he stops at Redwall during the great feast which happens every summer, and helps prepare for an attack from the sea rat army. The army is controlled by Dumag Warfang the greatrat. Brian Jacques is known for writing fantasy books that would appeal to anyone who wants a book that keeps you thinking and throws a laugh in every once in a while. All of his books incorporate many types of tones and language. The moles have gruff type of dialect such as ¿Hurr, gudd day to ee, zur wot you¿m be doin¿ yurrabouts?¿ While the hares speak in a more jolly tone ¿Hmph! Used to patrol down that way, y¿know, lots of toads, nasty slimy types, murderous blighters, hope the cliffs fell on them wot.¿ The three groups meet at a giant rock next to a small gorge. The battle goes on but what happens? Will the vast army of Dumag Warfang defeat the peaceful redwallers and the hares of Salamandastron? The only way to find out is to read this amazing book that is full of excitement and adventure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2006

    The best Redwall book yet!

    Brain Jacques really outdoes himself in this masterfully written tale. Filled with humor, sadness, and an amazing sense of adventure. Find this book and read it. Now!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2005

    What the Long Patrol is about

    The Long Patrol is Brian Jacque's best book he has ever written. Most of his books I would rate four star but this one wasted his other books. This is defiantly one of my top five books. The Long Patrol is about a hare named Tammo who wants to join the Long Patrol But his father says he is too little. His mother helps her son to run off and join the Long Patrol. Through his journey he runs into 11 Long Patrol hares were learns more about Salamandastron were a badger is in command of the long Patrol. Colonel Eyebright said,¿ I never knew or heard of a badger sufferin' from the blood wrath so badly.' Tammo also learned about a Rapscallion army heading towards Salamandastrons greatest ally the abbey of Redwall, but part of the south wall is breaking at Redwall. Now the Long Patrol is moving out to stop the Rapscallions. Tammo is just about to enter the greatest battle of his time.For ages 11-up

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2004

    LOVED IT, COULDN'T PUT IT DOWN!

    THIS WAS A LOT BETTER THAN PEARLS OF LUTRA AND OUTCAST. I RECOMMEND IT TO ANYONE WHO READS REDWALL!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2004

    Wot Wot Wot, this is absoballylutely great-o, chaps!

    My oh my! This is certainly one of the bestest Reddy Wally books there is.... Read it now if you haven't.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2004

    Awesome book

    This is one of the best Redwall books yet! It tells of how a young hare becomes part of the Long Patrol.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2003

    Top Hole!! Best of redwall!

    this book is about the quest of a young hare to join his heros in the famed long patrol(hence the name). the book is set in the time some seasons after the time of the first radwall. this book is 20 on o scale of 1 to 10,wot wot.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2004

    Age 11

    This is one of his best books! It's full of adventure! It was sad, though, when Tammo's frend squirrl,Russa Nodrey died, but the book is still exellent! this book is his best book yet. Read it!!!

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