The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency

The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency

by Ken Albala, Rosanna Nafziger Henderson, Marjorie Nafziger
     
 

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The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme, off-the-grid living. It’s for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs: people who love to cook, love fresh natural ingredients, and old techniques for preservation; people who like doing things themselves with a needle and thread, garden hoe, or manual saw.

Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger

Overview

The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme, off-the-grid living. It’s for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs: people who love to cook, love fresh natural ingredients, and old techniques for preservation; people who like doing things themselves with a needle and thread, garden hoe, or manual saw.

Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger Henderson spread the spirit of antiquated self-sufficiency throughout the household. They offer projects that are decidedly unplugged and a little daring, including:

* Home building projects like rooftop food dehydrators and wood-burning ovens
* Homemaking essentials, from sewing and quilting to rug braiding and soap making
* The wonders of grain: making croissants by hand, sprouting grains, and baking bread
* Adventures with meat: pickled pig’s feet, homemade liverwurst, and celery-cured salami

Intended for industrious cooks and crafters who aren’t afraid to roll up their sleeves, The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home will teach you the history and how-to on projects for every facet of your home, all without the electric toys that take away from the experience of making things by hand.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Albala and Henderson follow up their The Lost Art of Real Cooking with an utterly charming collection of recipes and how-tos for the 21st-century hipster homemaker. Like postmodern Elizabeth Davids, they augment their own recipes with obscure, intriguing ones from earlier centuries, such as Apicius’s fourth-century Apricot Minutal, which stews up the fruit with spices and garum, an ancient fish sauce. The book consists mostly of recipes—albeit for unusual, slow-food, and occasionally bizarre dishes such as injera (Ethiopian sourdough pancakes), liverwurst, thousand-year-old eggs (“among the scariest things I have ever tried at home”), kombucha, and butter sauce with ambergris (yes, the “waxy glob that forms in the intestines of sperm whales, which they barf up”)—but, like a quirky updated 1896 Fannie Farmer cookbook, it also includes eccentric but usable household hints and instructions, from soap-making to pounding a ring out of an old silver quarter (using an expedited method invented by Henderson’s father). A fun gift for any curious reader, the book is a must-have for makers and urban homesteaders. (Oct. 2)
From the Publisher
“If Irma S. Rombauer hadn't used the phrase more than 70 years ago, the ideal title for this engaging little volume—half cookbook, half culinary sermon—might have been The Joy of Cooking.”—The Wall Street Journal on The Lost Art of Real Cooking

The Lost Art of Real Cooking is a reminder that inspiring cookbooks can be more useful kitchen tools than any appliance.”—LA Weekly on The Lost Art of Real Cooking

Library Journal
Albala (history, Univ. of the Pacific) and Henderson (coauthor with Albala, The Lost Art of Real Cooking) here tackle household projects both comestible (brewing, preserving) and not (rug braiding, hammering silver quarters into wedding rings, making one's own broom). Despite the depth and breadth of topics covered here, the book is not for homesteaders or those heading for a life off the grid. The intended audience is city dwellers or suburbanites whose time is limited but who want to regain a measure of self-sufficiency over their domestic lives by making some of the objects they use and foods they consume and who want to have fun doing so. Recipes are written in an informal, narrative format, rather thanproviding the standard list of ingredients followed by directions. The projects range from familiar items like sourdough bread and liverwurst to more unusual ones like Acorn Crepes, Jasper of Milk, and something known, mysteriously, as Pig Jam. The authors also explore ingredients and animal parts used infrequently in American kitchens, such as gingko nuts and chicken feet. VERDICT The project instructions are clear and easy to follow and there's quite a lot of humor in the text. Recommended for anyone interested in learning new domestic skills.—Stephanie Klose, Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399537776
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/02/2012
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
560,247
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“If Irma S. Rombauer hadn't used the phrase more than 70 years ago, the ideal title for this engaging little volume—half cookbook, half culinary sermon—might have been The Joy of Cooking.”—The Wall Street Journal on The Lost Art of Real Cooking

The Lost Art of Real Cooking is a reminder that inspiring cookbooks can be more useful kitchen tools than any appliance.”—LA Weekly on The Lost Art of Real Cooking

Meet the Author

The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme, off-the-grid living. It's for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs: people who love to cook, love fresh natural ingredients, and old techniques for preservation; people who like doing things themselves with a needle and thread, garden hoe, or manual saw. Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger Henderson spread the spirit of antiquated self-sufficiency throughout the household. They offer projects that are decidedly unplugged and a little daring, including:
• Home building projects like rooftop food dehydrators and wood-burning ovens
• Homemaking essentials, from sewing and quilting to rug braiding and soap making
• The wonders of grain: making croissants by hand, sprouting grains, and baking bread
• Adventures with meat: pickled pig's feet, homemade liverwurst, and celery-cured salami Intended for industrious cooks and crafters who aren't afraid to roll up their sleeves, The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home will teach you the history and how-to on projects for every facet of your home, all without the electric toys that take away from the experience of making things by hand.

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