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The Lost Boy: A Novella / Edition 1
     

The Lost Boy: A Novella / Edition 1

5.0 2
by Thomas Wolfe, James W. Clark, Ed Lindlof
 

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ISBN-10: 0807844861

ISBN-13: 9780807844861

Pub. Date: 08/26/1994

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

Lost Boy: A Novella

Overview

Lost Boy: A Novella

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807844861
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
08/26/1994
Series:
Chapel Hill Books Series
Edition description:
1
Pages:
95
Sales rank:
622,830
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.31(d)

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The Lost Boy: A Novella 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
How and when does 'Now' cease, and memory commence? What is Time?, what is eternity? Tough concepts for the human language to wrestle with. This novella is told from four distinct points of view, which takes some getting used to. The prose is often beautiful and reminds one of the sheer wonder of being alive on this earth. The story begins with a barely fictionalized description of the fountain in Pack Square, Asheville NC. The fountain still pulses in Pack Square today, but nearly all the buildings described in this story are long gone. The stone cutter's shop run by the lost boy's father, in fact, was replaced by a 10-story 'skyscraper' in the 1920s, and the skyscraper stands as almost a relic today. The Wolfes - who [fictionally] dominate this story - have rested for decades in a shaded cemetary plot on the outskirts of Asheville. There is something profoundly ironic in visiting Tom's grave after reading 'The Lost Boy'. The book reminded me of the brevity and the beauty of life on earth - and the importance of opening my eyes, really paying attention, and being grateful for the time I have had here. The restrictions of the novella form seem to tighten Wolfe's prose a bit, which I welcomed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read about this story, but I want to read the actual story titled 'The Lost Boy'