The Lost Code (Atlanteans Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

In the year 2086, Camp Eden promises summer "the way things used to be," back before the oceans rose and modern civilization sank into chaos. Located inside the EdenWest BioDome, the camp is an oasis of pine trees, cool water, and rustic charm.

But all at Camp Eden is not what it seems.

No one will know this better than fifteen-year-old Owen Parker. A strange underwater vision, even stranger wounds on Owen's neck, and a cryptic warning from the...

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The Lost Code (Atlanteans Series #1)

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Overview

In the year 2086, Camp Eden promises summer "the way things used to be," back before the oceans rose and modern civilization sank into chaos. Located inside the EdenWest BioDome, the camp is an oasis of pine trees, cool water, and rustic charm.

But all at Camp Eden is not what it seems.

No one will know this better than fifteen-year-old Owen Parker. A strange underwater vision, even stranger wounds on Owen's neck, and a cryptic warning from the enchanting lifeguard Lilly hint at a mystery that will take Owen deep beneath Lake Eden and even deeper into the past. What he discovers could give him the chance to save the tattered planet. But first, Owen will have to escape Camp Eden alive. . . .

Kevin Emerson's thrilling novel The Lost Code is Book One of the Atlanteans series.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 8–10—In a postapocalyptic world in which water is scarce and sunlight kills, privileged teenagers still enjoy the opportunity to attend summer camps. These camps are set up in giant domes that protect the inhabitants from radioactivity and allow everyone within to pretend that everything is fine. Owen is a poor kid from Hub whose father entered him into a drawing, and Owen won. During a swim on his second day of camp, Owen drowns… but he doesn't die. Instead, he begins to change in unexplainable ways, and he soon learns that he's not the only one. When he begins to talk to some of the other campers, he learns that over the years, students have vanished and their disappearances have been conveniently explained by the staff. He also learns that the dome is beginning to fail. This book examines a postapocalyptic world from a different perspective, because all the action takes place in a setting that closely resembles any summer camp one might visit today. However, underneath the varnish of swimming holes, archery ranges, and mess halls, there is the truth that the Earth is dying. Owen is an awkward teen-not a natural hero. Even though his body is metamorphosing into something strange and he's being called to fulfill an ancient quest, he's still a self-conscious guy, trying to get the girl to like him. The ending of the book leaves plenty of room for the sequel, and readers will likely be intrigued enough to continue.—Heather M. Campbell, formerly at Philip S. Miller Library, Castle Rock, CO
Publishers Weekly
Emerson (Carlos Is Gonna Get It) launches the Atlanteans series with a novel that blends post-apocalyptic, SF, and paranormal elements into a summer camp story. In a future in which climate change has rendered most of the planet uninhabitable, teenage Owen has gotten a rare scholarship to Camp Eden, where privileged kids and survivors of cryogenic freezing can experience a simulation of the biosphere of old. When he almost drowns, he discovers the camp's hidden secret: Owen and a handful of others (including his crush, Lilly) have developed gills and can breathe underwater. Owen is thrilled by his new abilities and sense of belonging, but when a child at the camp dies under mysterious circumstances, it becomes apparent that something sinister is occurring at Camp Eden. As Owen and friends attempt to figure out who to trust, they uncover more conspiracies about both the camp and the state of the world. Emerson throws perhaps a little too much into the book, but the high-stakes narrative moves forward with momentum, and a romance between Owen and Lilly is gracefully unveiled. Ages 13–up. Agent: George Nicholson, Sterling Lord Literistic. (May)
Michael Grant
“A smart dystopian adventure packed with mind-blowing fantasy and characters you’ll love.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"The broad strokes of conflict and characterization make this a movie-ready action flick at heart...an accessible entree to the dystopia trend."
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
“The broad strokes of conflict and characterization make this a movie-ready action flick at heart...an accessible entree to the dystopia trend.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“The broad strokes of conflict and characterization make this a movie-ready action flick at heart...an accessible entree to the dystopia trend.”
Peter Lerangis
“The Lost Code will stop your heart with scenes of passion and power, as it draws you in to a group of kids who are the only hope in a dying world of artifice and desperation. What happens to them is like nothing you’ve ever read.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“The broad strokes of conflict and characterization make this a movie-ready action flick at heart...an accessible entree to the dystopia trend.”
VOYA - Jennifer McIntosh
Owen is just a normal kid living underground in the mines to escape the deadly sun in a dystopian future with a limited ozone layer when he is picked to attend the exclusive Camp Eden. Camp Eden is protected from the sun by a huge dome set up to mimic the outside world—with its own sun, moon, stars, clouds, and ecosystem. On the surface, things seem pretty good at Camp Eden, but when weak swimmer Owen survives ten minutes under water without breathing, things start to get weird. Owen's neck is mysteriously gashed, and the only thing that soothes the gashes is being under water. Owen soon learns that he is part of a special race of people, the Atlanteans, called upon to rescue the world and fix a mistake made thousands of years ago. The first in a new series, The Lost Code will satisfy teens' thirst for post-apocalyptic dystopian novels with just the right amount of suspense, adventure, science fiction, fantasy, and romance, but without the brutal violence found in other stories. Readers will eagerly devour Owen's tale and look forward to its continuation. Reviewer: Jennifer McIntosh
Kirkus Reviews
Coming-of-age story meets conspiracy thriller at a summer camp in a post–climate-catastrophe world. During his first full day at Camp Eden Owen drowns. In the 10 minutes he's underwater before lifeguard (and Owen's crush) Lilly rescues him, he survives by sprouting gills. Camp Eden exists in a distant future wrecked so severely by global warming that it must be contained in climate-controlled BioDome. Owen's disastrous introduction to the camp is normal for him--he isn't a privileged full-time dome resident, but a kid who won a lottery to attend camp, socially awkward and physically weak. Lilly warns him not to reveal his gills to the staff and invites him into the counselor-in-training clique for secret swims with their shared mutations. Investigating the camp--why would letting the camp director know about the gills be dangerous?--leads to his discovery that the dome is close to failing, as well as hints at a larger scheme that will doom or save the world. The conspiracy hinges on Owen. Minor social conflicts fail to ramp up enough tension until the long-awaited main plot begins in earnest--more than halfway through--bringing high stakes. The plot suffers from the pacing, but it ends with a big finish. Between Owen, likable in his thoughtfully awkward way while evolving into a hero, and the lovingly crafted setting, Camp Eden offers summer escapism. (Science fiction. 11-17)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062062819
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/22/2012
  • Series: Atlanteans Series , #1
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 17,124
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Kevin Emerson

Kevin Emerson is the author of eleven books, including The Lost Code and The Dark Shore, books 1 and 2 of the Atlanteans series. Kevin is a singer, drummer, and guitarist and has played in bands since high school, none of which need to be named here, but all of which seemed like a good idea at the time. He has toured across the country and in Europe and the UK and now lives in Seattle, one of the best music cities in the world.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 204 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(72)

4 Star

(71)

3 Star

(42)

2 Star

(9)

1 Star

(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 204 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    @anonymous May 31, 2013.

    I was hesitant to write this because I think reviews should be about the book, but I didn't know where else to put it. I agree with you 100%, that is why I won't read any book/movie review that is longer than a few sentences. The very instant I see "so and so did this, then; or "it starts with so and so doing" I quit reading. I belive the sellers need to screen the reviews and weed out those that want to retell the whole story because I want to read the authors story not someone elses version. Please B&N can't you be the first to do this for your customers?

    26 out of 45 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2012

    What an amazing little surprise this book was! It is quite the p

    What an amazing little surprise this book was! It is quite the page turner! Can't wait for the rest of the trilogy to come out!!

    16 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 29, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    A bit too immature

    The book wasn't bad, it just wasn't something that I could relate to. I think part of the problem is that the narrator and main character was a teenage boy, and I've never been a teenage boy. That made it hard to relate to him right away. I guess he seemed pretty authentic for a teenage boy, albeit a bit G-rated. I've put a lot of thought in this and I put of reviewing this book because I couldn't figure out what it was that made me reject all of the characters. I finally came up with the answer: This book is written for a younger audience. That has to be it. I couldn't relate, and it was very G-rated and very immature at times. So, I think this was written for a junior high/early high school audience. Considering I'm an adult female college student, this did not work for me at all.

    This story started out slowly, but in the second half of the book, the pacing picked up substantially. I mean, you'd think it'd be action packed because it started out with the main character dying, but I didn't feel a sense of urgency there. And Owen is about the most boring character I've ever read. I didn't really care if he died. He just didn't have much of a personality. I never knew what Owen was feeling other than confused. That also made it hard for me to connect to him or any of the other characters. Since I was seeing the other characters through his eyes, they all seemed boring because he described them in a boring fashion.

    The idea behind the story is great, but I do feel that it could have been executed better. I needed to care about Owen before I cared about any action that happened, and I did not. Also, I think that more information and more of the suspenseful occurrences should have happened in the first half. Not necessarily at the beginning, but in the first half, at least. I think the way this book was laid out was just all wrong. First, we needed character development so that we cared about the character. Without the "so what?" question answered from the beginning, the reader is not going to care about the rest of the book. Next, we needed something to keep us reading past the first half of the book. Give us some more information and some more action. Third, the book needed a romance that actually felt like a romance. Any romance in the book (there was very little) was also boring and lacking feeling. It was also incredibly G-rated, which leads me to think that this book was meant for a younger audience.

    Overall, I'd recommend this book to kids in junior high who want to read a mythological adventure story. If you're over the age of 14, I'd say check it out from the library first.

    16 out of 49 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    Hint to !

    If the review is longer then a couple of paragraphs... Do Not Read! Simple as that :)

    14 out of 35 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    !

    Enough with the plot spoilers ppl. Thanks to you i now know its a rehash of percy jackson and you have ruined another book. Thanks, insert very heavy sarcasm here. I am so sick of each and every one of you,

    11 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 25, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This was a read that I truly enjoyed. With no previous experienc

    This was a read that I truly enjoyed. With no previous experience with Emerson's writing I wasn't sure what to expect, and was pleasantly surprised to find that I have yet another author to add to my list of favorites. His characters were unassuming and hard to resist, his writing kept a quick pace when you wanted it and slowed down when dealing in facts and ancient secrets that a reader might need time to absorb. Overall it was a combination that kept me on the edge of my seat, waiting with baited breath to see what would happen to these new and exciting characters next.

    When I first encountered this title I was only thinking of one thing...atlanteans. I later realized that while this ancient race of people would play a vital role, there was so much more to be found within these pages. Seeing what could become of Earth if people kept things up at the rate we're currently going today, the results and consequences were pretty scary and something I'd rather avoid if at all possible if I might add.

    Owen was adorable. A guy that you can't help but like and root for when he's coming into his own before a reader's very eyes. He was just a normal guy, liked to keep to himself, and try to avoid any notice, and yet there was no avoiding the changes that he had to adjust to and the transformation that was inevitable. Without giving too much away, let's just say that Owen was in for a huge wake up call when he started to realize whom his ancestors were. Not something you can prepare for, but all the same, I think he handled things well, and with a little help from some new friends the transition went as best as I think he could hope for under the circumstances.

    But honestly, this book is for everyone, guys, girls, history buffs, fantasy fans, you name it and I think you'll really enjoy this read. Emerson won me over, and I'm truly looking forward to seeing what happens in the next installment in the series.

    9 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2012

    A person

    I was really good and creative with some imagination but it was somewhat predictable. :/

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 15, 2012

    This book HAS to be better than any other I've read, the way it'

    This book HAS to be better than any other I've read, the way it's written makes it impossible to pull away from it. It's filled with amazing adventure and heart stopping thrill. Lost Code became a family favorite, even for the little siblings. They often play "mermaid" games and have become addicted to the pool. Overall, I'd recomend this book to anyone, of any age!

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 14, 2012

    Highly Recommended - Great YA Summer Reading!

    Soon after arriving at Camp Eden, Owen's near-death experience, his startling physical metamorphosis, and his unlikely liaison with Lilly, set the stage for an exciting adventure of ancient discovery in a futuristic world ravaged by global climate change. Owen's self-realization leads him through discovery, danger and an increasing understanding of his role in the survival of civilizations, past and present. A plausible and harsh future world environment is the stage for this exciting fantasy that should thoroughly satisfy the young adult appetite and leave the reader hungry for the next chapter in the story!

    7 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 22, 2012

    I’ve seen different versions of the future in different dy

    I’ve seen different versions of the future in different dystopian and post-apocalyptic novels. I’ve seen zombie and vampire-infested worlds, virus ravaged worlds, flooded worlds and sun-baked worlds but The Lost Code’s story world was one of the most realistic and frightening of them all. The too hot sun baked the earth dry. People couldn’t go out in the open once the sun was up. The only safe places were the Habitable Zone and the Eden Domes. The history of the changes in the world that was integrated in the novel was probably the most accurate and probable of all the things I’ve read.

    Emerson’s attention to detail was amazing. After reading The Lost Code, I really felt that I’ve lived in EdenWest. It was great to see how the dome itself functioned, as well as how it was failing. The Eye controlled everything in the dome: the SafeSun lamps, the robot birds and butterflies, the artificial sound of the night insects, the lightning, the rain, and even the stars in the sky.

    I liked how Owen developed throughout the novel from being the ‘Turtle’ who drowned to being a fishboy with gills who spent the night swimming with the CITs to finally finishing the metamorphosis and becoming the Atlantean that he was meant to be. He was no longer lost. He knew who he was and he knew his purpose in this world. It was good to finally see him confident, especially when it came to expressing his feelings towards Lilly, one of the CITs.

    But just went things were getting good, the Nomads attacked the dome. Lilly was ranting about her theories on why they have gills and Eden’s ulterior motives. A siren kept appearing in the water, insisting that Owen find her in an underwater temple. Owen also found out that there have been disappearances throughout the years in Camp. Paul, the head of the Camp, was sugarcoating his words, assuring the campers that everything was okay. But was it true?

    I felt that there was a portion in the middle of the novel that dragged but once the story hit the 2/3 mark, things got better. I was blown away with shocking revelation after shocking revelation. There were twists and turns, more complications, more allies and more questions. Suspense and action tangled together and eventually brought an inspiring ending.

    I’ve always been interested in Atlantis. I remember watching the Disney movie and thinking how it beautiful it was when I was a kid. But Emerson took Atlantis’ grandeur to a whole new level. The ancient civilization had a kind of technology and advancement that surpassed even some of the advancements of the future world. When Owen tapped into the Atlantean psyche, the visions that surged in his head were breathtaking and at the same time, scary.

    The Lost Code is a thrilling adventure that will keep readers wrapped up in the mystery, the secrets and the discoveries. This novel got all the things I love: dystopia, Atlantis secrets and science. I recommend this to people who enjoy dystopia, mystery and fantasy.

    6 out of 34 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    B&N, Sift through & REMOVE ALL Spoilers/Social-Misfits :O(

    I speak for those who are plain Sick & Tired of Spoilers/3-4 paragraph idiots, who remain stiff-necked about their offense!
    Editorial Reviews are even worse. Not to mention the kids who choose to use up this site as a Boot-leg "Social Ntework!" People like me rely on the reviews providing spoil-free reviews & give proper literary Feedback. Step-Up B&N!

    5 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 15, 2012

    Another dystopian novel? Author Kevin Emerson created a standalo

    Another dystopian novel? Author Kevin Emerson created a standalone novel
    in the popular dystopian genre. The reader is introduced to Owen, a
    slightly nerdy and funny young teen at a camp. Owen isn't at just any
    camp, however, the camp represents one of the only remaining habitable
    places on Earth. Earth has been ravaged by humans; the ozone layer has
    broken down and the fresh water is rapidly evaporating. Owen and his
    fellow campers are told that their small corner of the world is doing
    well, but Owen and a few of his "kind" believe there might be
    a deeper story. Owen isn't the most popular boy at camp. He is
    regularly bullied by a few of the "cryo" children and their
    followers. The cryo children were frozen at the start of the ozone
    layer's breakdown by their families in a bid to save them. The reader
    will admire Owen's ability to stand up for himself and find his footing
    even when the reader knows many would cower. The other characters are
    fun to get to know, the author does a great job of developing many of
    the secondary characters. Owen's love interest, Lilly, is suspicious,
    intelligent, and somewhat mercurial in her moods. The reader will be
    rooting for the two throughout the novel. With a plot as edgy and
    compelling as this, Emerson will capture and hold the readers' attention
    throughout the book. The reader will look forward to getting to know
    Owen and many of the other characters better and discovering the mystery
    behind the camp the characters inhabit. This book is recommended to
    young adult/teen readers.

    5 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    This is not a review, it's more pf This is a This is not a review, it' Please read , this is a request

    I appreciate the free friday reviews, quite often I am not familiar with the author or genre so reviews are quite helpful. Somethings I would like to know are: What is the book's target age group, and number of pages? Thanks to those of you who are fast readers and get your reviews in for us latecomers! By the way, I couldn't agree more about the plot spoilers. Please, folks, when it comes to details, remember that "less is more"!

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 29, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The Lost Code was another anticipated book of 2012 for me. The c

    The Lost Code was another anticipated book of 2012 for me. The cover is really cool, though I don't like it when they show the character's faces because I want my imagination to decide how they look. The synopsis was a bit weird, but it did sound very interesting. I expected this book to be full of fun, adrenaline, and excitement. I'm sorry to say that it wasn't as great as I expected it to be, but it was good overall.
    The main protagonist is a boy, which wasn't clear for me until a while. Owen's world is destroyed from the ozone layer, and the ocean levels have risen, and their main enemy is the bright sun. I'm not sure where they "live" if they can't be out in the open, but i'm guessing it's someplace protected or underground even. Owen goes to a camp, which wasn't clarified if it was just a summer camp for kids or what type of camp exactly. In this camp, the children/teenagers are put in groups. I don't want to write any spoilers here, but one day, Owen discovers something magical that he has. The thing is, I never expected that to happen. I didn't understand the conflict between the good and bad characters either. I was confused at so many parts, and I really felt like many things weren't very clear. I had no problems at all with the writing, but I enjoyed the first half of the story much more than the last half.
    Even though I might not have enjoyed it as much as I wanted to; I do know that many people did. The idea is very weird, but in a good way. I'm not sure if I might pick up the second book, but if I had extra time on my hands, I will give it another chance, just to find out what happens next!

    4 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    Good freebie

    This is one of the free Friday books that I actually like! Thanks B&N c:

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2012

    Loved it!

    Very creative. Thuroghly enjoyable.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 22, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    4.5 stars Owen is enjoying his time at summer camp until he dro

    4.5 stars Owen is enjoying his time at summer camp until he drowns. But he wakes up (technicians--in his mind or real--moniter and help regulate his body functions) and tries to figure out why he now is able to swim underwater with the aid of gills. In his dystopian world, he lives in one of the few places where humans still survive. Owen realizes that things are just not what they are portrayed to be at the cam pat about the same time he figures out there are others like him.

    Lots of action and suspense. Owen's romance with Lily is sweet and typical of teens, and as a bonus, it's important to the story. I was initially a bit put off by the fantasy-like Atlantean area under water but it quickly made sense. The story is believeable in that I can see our world, without a drastic change in direction, heading this way. I highly recommend this book and look forward with great anticipation to the next in the series.

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2013

    Excellant page-turner full of surprises!

    This book exceeded expectations. Story revolves around teenagers but shouldn't be considered just a YA offering. It's intriguing, and as soon as you think you know where its going, something surprises you. I will definitely be reading the next book in the series.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2013

    Excellent!""

    If you loved the adventrous books like Percy Jacksons or even Hunger Games, this book is totally recommended.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2013

    Awesome

    Great book. Def reccomend this one if you liked Percy Jackson and vice versa.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 204 Customer Reviews

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