The Lost Goddess: A Novel

( 13 )

Overview

From the internationally bestselling author of The Genesis Secret-a seductive, exotic new thriller

In the silent caves beneath France, young archaeologist Julia Kerrigan unearths an ancient skull-with a hole bored through the forehead. After she reveals her discovery, her mentor is brutally murdered. Deep in the jungles of Southeast Asia, photographer Jake Thurby is offered a mysterious assignment by a beautiful Cambodian lawyer who is ...

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The Lost Goddess: A Novel

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Overview

From the internationally bestselling author of The Genesis Secret-a seductive, exotic new thriller

In the silent caves beneath France, young archaeologist Julia Kerrigan unearths an ancient skull-with a hole bored through the forehead. After she reveals her discovery, her mentor is brutally murdered. Deep in the jungles of Southeast Asia, photographer Jake Thurby is offered a mysterious assignment by a beautiful Cambodian lawyer who is investigating finds at the two-thousand-year-old Plain of Jars-finds that shadowy forces want kept secret.

From the temples of Angkor Wat and the wild streets of Bangkok to the prehistoric caves in Western Europe, what links Jake's and Julia's discoveries is a strange, demonic woman whose unquenchable thirst for vengeance-and the horrors she seeks to avenge- are truly shocking.

Readers have become enthralled by Knox's vivid blend of buccaneering modern adventure, gothic horror, and grand intellectual puzzles. The Lost Goddess is his most exciting novel to date.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This quirky novel from the pseudonymous Knox (British journalist Sean Thomas) combines elements of the best of several genres, shakes them up, then lays them out in surprisingly original patterns. In an isolated cave in southern France, archeologist Julia Kerrigan discovers neolithic skeletons, the skulls of which show evidence of trepanation, holes deliberately bored in the middle of the foreheads. Meanwhile in Laos, photographer Jake Thurby and a beautiful Cambodian woman from Phnom Penh, Chemda Tek, are chasing a story with origins in the mysterious Plain of Jars. Subplots involve human and chimpanzee interbreeding, the horrific depredations of the Khmer Rouge, the Ice Age cave paintings of Lascaux, Khmer voodoo, mummified fetuses, and a plan by the Chinese to develop a super soldier. Along the way, Knox (The Genesis Secret) doles out enough tantalizing scientific, social, and spiritual lore to sate even the hungriest anthropological thriller reader. Agent: Jay Mandel. (Jan.)
Booklist
"[The Marks of Cain is] an intriguing, well-told story."
Jeff Abbott
"Tom Knox knows the DNA of an astonishing thriller. The Marks of Cain...may well be the most controversial thriller since The Da Vinci Code."
The Wall Street Journal
"Mr. Knox's speculations are good ones, making you wonder what might really have been going on in dictators' secret laboratories."
The Dallas Morning News
“[The Genesis Secret] makes one want to tear through the pages to find out what happens next.”
Suspense Magazine
The Lost Goddess is a globetrotting adventure with shades of Dan Brown and Indiana Jones....A page-turner."
Library Journal
What links two startling discoveries, a weathered skull with a hole neatly smacked through the forehead, found in a French cave, and something possibly creepier at Laos's 2000-year-old Plain of Jars? Modern-day forces clearly want the finds suppressed, and it all leads to one spooky and obsessed woman out to avenge a terrible wrong. Indiana Jones meets Grand Guignol, with a touch of Holmes-like puzzling. Knox is rumored to be building a dedicated audience, so keep an eye on this one.
Kirkus Reviews
After learning of the horrific crossbreeding experiments conducted by the Khmer Rouge during the '70s—and the international conspiracy of silence that surrounds those experiments still—a female archaeologist and male photographer have their lives threatened and their sanity questioned. Globetrotting young British photographer Jake Thurby is hoping to make a name for himself when he accepts a job from Chemda Tek, a beautiful and mysterious American-educated Cambodian investigating Khmer atrocities. American archaeologist Julia Kerrigan hopes the strange set of perforated skulls she uncovers at a dig in remote southern France will make her reputation. Several grotesque murders, horrendous acts of sorcery and bizarre sexual attacks later, the protagonists team up to confront the grisly truth. Told in cliffhanger style, one narrative interrupting the other at the most crucial moments, the book will do no favors for the tourist trade in Southeast Asia. Only Jake, who after falling for Chemda gets chased through the rugged terrain of Cambodia and Laos, has any reason to hang around. Knox (real name: Sean Thomas) has traveled this path before in The Marks of Cain (2010, etc.). If he recognizes the riotous absurdity of depressed, brain-drilled ape-men giving in to their animal desires, he doesn't let on. The book features two such attacks. Pure potboiler, with a little commentary about America's inconsistency in Southeast Asia sprinkled in, the book begins entertainingly enough but can't overcome its debt to Island of Lost Souls. Knox does shed some light on actual "hybridization" experiments ordered by Stalin, among other leaders. In the end, the Khmer massacres are too enormous in their inhumanity to function as the backdrop for a thriller.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780452298989
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 12/24/2012
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 316,264
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Tom Knox is the pseudonym for the journalist and writer Sean Thomas. He lives in London.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(5)

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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 17, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The Lost Goddess starts out interestingly enough, with an archae

    The Lost Goddess starts out interestingly enough, with an archaeological
    discovery in a French cave, followed by a mysterious assault in the
    dying artificial light deep underground. For me, that opening scene was
    the highlight of the novel, which is a definite problem - that level of
    tension and suspense is simply never recaptured anywhere else within the
    story. A lot of the action seemed to be mere padding, such as the
    extended tangent of police chases and family squabbles that nearly
    brought the middle of the book to a halt. What I had hoped would be a
    fun archaeological adventure (akin to Matthew Reilly), though, and was
    even willing to accept as yet another pale imitation of Dan Brown,
    simply got bogged down by way more religious fanaticism and politics
    than I cared to wade through. Where it completely lost my interest was
    with its heavy-handed approach in equating 'faith' with all that is good
    and pure in the world, and 'atheism' with all that is evil and cruel.
    There is actually a line towards the end of the novel where one of the
    characters calls atheism "a form of dementia . . . a mental
    illness." It's a shame, because the Hands of Gargas and the Plain
    of Jars are definitely unique MacGuffins to explore, and there are hints
    of competent writing here. If only the the history hadn't been wasted in
    info-dumps, and then overshadowed by the social/political commentary and
    religious fanaticism, it could have been an average thriller.
    All-in-all, a rather disappointing read, and an author I certainly don't
    care to revisit.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2012

    The Lost Color by Numbers

    Knox takes the rich vein of 70's marxists and the Khmer Rouge and cranks out a trite, predictable pot boiler with " twists" at the end that will make you want to chuck the book against the nearest wall.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2012

    The worse novel I have ever read. This book was so boring it to

    The worse novel I have ever read. This book was so boring it took me a month to get through it. The characters would have to be superheroes to get out of all the trouble they found themselves in, and they must have had millions of dollars to be able to travel all over the world to get into more boring trouble.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 3, 2012

    Interesting

    Review: The Lost Goddess by Tom Knox
    4 STARS
    I have mixed views on this book. Their is a lot of history in here that I really did not know about. All the violence of the past is painful, scary and the numbers are hard to believe. But if we do not learn from the past we will repeat it.
    The mystery and suspense some of it or a lot of the science bits I did not totally understand and I really hope that part if pure fiction but know some is probably true.
    Their are two parts of the story and how they switched threw me some and had to realize that they had switched again.
    Julia was a archaeolgist working in a cave underground in France at the begining. I liked her but wanted more emotion from her. I felt a little detached from her. She was trying to put the pieces together and came up with a theory.
    Jake was a photographer who was working on photos for a coffee book when he wanted to find out more of what was happened in the past That Chemda was trying to uncover in Cambodia. So Jake went with her to the Plain of Jars and their escape to figure out the past and stay alive began.
    I had a hard time caring about Jake and Chemda I don't know if it was I could not totally escape into the book or if just a bad day for me to connect. I am thinking it was because I was more concerned about the real victims in the history of the region that I could not enjoy the book more.
    I know that I want to know more of the region history and have already looked up and read more about the Plain of Jars. The history and the discriptions of the region were real and I could envision it.
    02/02/2012 PUB
    Penguin Group, USA

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 18, 2013

    Although the author mixes the real historical details of Cambodi

    Although the author mixes the real historical details of Cambodia and archeology, and knows his technical information, the plot is so unbelievable, its hard to swallow. Almost have to read it like science fiction. The story finally became so outlandish, I simply couldn't finish the book. Totally beyond any resemblance of plausibility. Waste of time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 10, 2012

    BEWARE of this book,,,,,it's the same book as Bible of the Dead

    BEWARE of this book,,,,,it's the same book as Bible of the Dead by Tom Knox -- just a new title and a little editing!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2014

    Still worth a read

    While not my favorite book by Tom Knox, I don't share the harsh opinion of other readers. The link of several often obscure real elements into one narrative is certainly strained and far-fetched at times, and it!s sometimes hard to believe that these characters could survive all their adventures. Also, this author is not for readers who are squeamish. However, I always find his work interesting and his descriptions compelling enough that I think about the places and ideas presented long after I finish the books. Bible of the Dead is a much better title than The Lost Goddess.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 8, 2014

    While the story line was interesting, the writing style was so a

    While the story line was interesting, the writing style was so awful that I was angry to have wasted my money on it. I was caught up in at first, but I kept wondering how this hack ever got to publish a number of books. I just couldn't force myself to get through the last quarter of the book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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