The Lost Prince (Iron Fey Series #5)

( 114 )

Overview

Don't look at Them. Never let Them know you can see Them.

That is Ethan Chase's unbreakable rule. Until the fey he avoids at all costs—including his reputation—begin to disappear, and Ethan is attacked. Now he must change the rules to protect his family. To save a girl he never thought he'd dare to fall for.

Ethan thought he had protected himself from his older sister's world—the land of Faery. His previous time in the Iron Realm left him with ...

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Overview

Don't look at Them. Never let Them know you can see Them.

That is Ethan Chase's unbreakable rule. Until the fey he avoids at all costs—including his reputation—begin to disappear, and Ethan is attacked. Now he must change the rules to protect his family. To save a girl he never thought he'd dare to fall for.

Ethan thought he had protected himself from his older sister's world—the land of Faery. His previous time in the Iron Realm left him with nothing but fear and disgust for the world Meghan Chase has made her home, a land of myth and talking cats, of magic and seductive enemies. But when destiny comes for Ethan, there is no escape from a danger long, long forgotten.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Kagawa kicks off her Iron Fey: Call of the Forgotten spinoff trilogy with a story told from the perspective of Ethan Chase, the younger brother of Meghan, who starred in the earlier books. Once a fey-snatched toddler, Ethan is now 17 and struggling to pretend that the “Nevernever” that swallowed up his sister doesn’t exist. Starting fresh at a new school, Ethan immediately meets a human/phouka half-breed, Todd, who is desperate for help against an unknown threat. There’s also a nosy school reporter, Kenzie, on the trail of the rumors surrounding Ethan. After Todd disappears, and a ghastly new kind of fey attacks Ethan and Kenzie, Ethan transports himself and Kenzie to the Nevernever, where the adventure really begins. This many books in, Kagawa is entirely at ease in her invented world, and her ability to create strong, intriguing characters has improved noticeably since The Iron King. Knowledge of the previous tales is helpful but not necessary—fans will feel right at home, and new readers will have no trouble finding their way. Ages 14–up. Agent: Laurie McLean, Larsen Pomada Literary Agents. (Nov.)
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—Ethan Chase, 18, tells people that his older half sister, Meghan, is dead, but she's not. She left his family to live in Nevernever, the land of the faeries, as the Iron Queen, after the adventures related in Kagawa's first "Iron Fey" series (Harlequin Teen). This first volume in a follow-up series begins as Ethan's reputation as a troublemaker follows him to a new high school, where he saves a half-faery fellow student from bullies and finds himself facing new dangers. Ethan's magical Sight allows him to see the many fey creatures that surround him, but it also lets him see the creatures that drain faery magic. Joined by his friend Kenzie, Ethan travels to Nevernever to warn the fey of the danger they face. With new allies, they return home to confront the danger that threatens their friends, leading to an action-packed magical confrontation. Ethan's character stands out due to his negative attitude toward magic, his martial-arts skills, and his determination that not making friends is the best way to keep others around him safe. Kagawa allows the relationship between Ethan and Kenzie to develop slowly and realistically, revealing details about their pasts as the story progresses and creating a strong appeal to readers of both genders. Fans of the first "Iron Fey" series will be interested in seeing Meghan and her family again, while new readers will find enough detail to help them jump right in and enjoy the magic, adventure, and touch of romance.—Beth L. Meister, Milwaukee Jewish Day School, WI
Kirkus Reviews
Iron Queen Meghan Chase's baby brother Ethan has grown into a broody bad boy. Ethan Chase wants nothing more than to keep his head down and avoid notice. He hates the fey, as they torment him and interfere with his life on a regular basis because he can see them. He ably fills the teen-literature trope of the bad boy with a heart of gold who pushes people away for their own protection by behaving like a jerk. But fresh from a fey-caused school expulsion, Ethan finds two new classmates who refuse to leave him alone--half-fey Todd, desperate for Ethan's help with a magical threat, and the rich, popular, attractive and above all, persistent school reporter, Kenzie. When Todd goes missing, Ethan surprises himself by plunging into Faery to try to save him from shadowy glamour-eating fey, a threat that may ring familiar to those who have read The Iron Knight (2011). Kenzie is caught in the crossfire. While unraveling the truth about this shadowy threat to Todd and other missing half-breeds and exiles, Ethan encounters various beloved Iron Fey characters in guest appearances and is joined by a simultaneously mysterious and familiar fey named Keirran. The danger accompanies multiple romantic plots. Kagawa's fans will enjoy this expansion of her world. (Fantasy. 12-15)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780373210572
  • Publisher: Harlequin
  • Publication date: 10/23/2012
  • Series: Iron Fey Series , #5
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 24,151
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Born in Sacramento, CA, Julie Kagawa moved to Hawaii at the age of nine. There she learned many things; how to bodyboard, that teachers scream when you put centipedes in their desks, and that writing stories in math class is a great way to kill time. Her teachers were glad to see her graduate.

Julie now lives is Louisville, KY with her husband and furkids. She is the international and NYT bestselling author of The Iron Fey series. Visit her at juliekagawa.com.

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Read an Excerpt

My name is Ethan Chase.

And I doubt I'll live to see my eighteenth birthday.

That's not me being dramatic; it just is. I just wish I hadn't pulled so many people into this mess. They shouldn't have to suffer because of me. Especially…her. God, if I could take back anything in my life, I would never have shown her my world, the hidden world all around us. I knew better than to let her in. Once you see Them, they'll never leave you alone. They'll never let you go. Maybe if I'd been strong, she wouldn't be here with me as our seconds tick away, waiting to die.

It all started the day I transferred to a new school. Again.

The alarm clock went off at 6:00 a.m., but I had been awake for an hour, getting ready for another day in my weird, screwed-up life. I wish I was one of those guys who roll out of bed, throw on a shirt and are ready to go, but sadly, my life isn't that normal. For instance, today I'd filled the side pockets of my backpack with dried Saint-John's-wort and stuffed a canister of salt in with my pens and notebook. I'd also driven three nails into the heels of the new boots Mom had bought me for the semester. I wore an iron cross on a chain beneath my shirt, and just last summer I'd gotten my ears pierced with metal studs. Originally, I'd gotten a lip ring and an eyebrow bar, too, but Dad had thrown a roof-shaking fit when I came home like that, and the studs were the only things I'd been allowed to keep.

Sighing, I spared a quick glance at myself in the mirror, making sure I looked as unapproachable as possible. Sometimes, I catch Mom looking at me sadly, as if she wonders where her little boy went. I used to have curly brown hair like Dad, until I took a pair of scissors and hacked it into jagged, uneven spikes. I used to have bright blue eyes like Mom and, apparently, like my sister. But over the years, my eyes have become darker, changing to a smoky-blue-gray—from constant glaring, Dad jokes. I never used to sleep with a knife under my mattress, salt around my windows, and a horseshoe over my door. I never used to be "brooding" and "hostile" and "impossible." I used to smile more, and laugh. I rarely do any of that now.

I know Mom worries about me. Dad says it's normal teenage rebellion, that I'm going through a "phase," and that I'll grow out of it. Sorry, Dad. But my life is far from normal. And I'm dealing with it the only way I know how.

"Ethan?" Mom's voice drifted into the room from beyond the door, soft and hesitant. "It's past six. Are you up?"

"I'm up." I grabbed my backpack and swung it over my white shirt, which was inside out, the tag poking up from the collar. Another small quirk my parents have gotten used to. "I'll be right out."

Grabbing my keys, I left my room with that familiar sense of resignation and dread stealing over me. Okay, then. Let's get this day over with.

I have a weird family.

You'd never know it by looking at us. We seem perfectly normal; a nice American family living in a nice suburban neighborhood, with nice clean streets and nice neighbors on either side. Ten years ago we lived in the swamps, raising pigs. Ten years ago we were poor, backwater folk, and we were happy. That was before we moved into the city, before we joined civilization again. My dad didn't like it at first; he'd spent his whole life as a farmer. It was hard for him to adjust, but he did, eventually. Mom finally convinced him that we needed to be closer to people, that I needed to be closer to people, that the constant isolation was bad for me. That was what she told Dad, of course, but I knew the real reason. She was afraid. She was afraid of Them, that They would take me away again, that I would be kidnapped by faeries and taken into the Nevernever.

Yeah, I told you, my family is weird. And that's not even the worst of it.

Somewhere out there, I have a sister. A half sister I haven't seen in years, and not because she's busy or married or across the ocean in some other country.

No, it's because she's a queen. A faery queen, one of Them, and she can't ever come home.

Tell me that's not messed up.

Of course, I can't ever tell anyone. To normal humans, the fey world is hidden—glamoured and invisible. Most people wouldn't see a goblin if it sauntered up and bit them on the nose. There are very few mortals cursed with the Sight, who can see faeries lurking in dark corners and under beds. Who know that the creepy feeling of being watched isn't just their imagination, and that the noises in the cellar or the attic aren't really the house settling.

Lucky me. I happen to be one of them.

My parents worry, of course, Mom especially. People already think I'm weird, dangerous, maybe a little crazy. Seeing faeries everywhere will do that to you. Because if the fey

know you can see them, they tend to make your life a living hell. Last year, I was kicked out of school for setting fire to the library. What could I tell them? I was innocent because I was trying to escape a redcap motley that followed me in from the street? And that wasn't the first time the fey had gotten me into trouble. I was the "bad kid," the one the teachers spoke about in hushed voices, the quiet, dangerous kid whom everyone expected would end up on the evening news for some awful, shocking crime. Sometimes, it was infuriating. I didn't really care what they thought of me, but it was hard on Mom, so I tried to be good, futile as it was.

This semester, I'd be going to a new school, a new location. A place I could "start clean," but it wouldn't matter. As long as I could see the fey, they would never leave me alone. All I could do was protect myself and my family, and hope I wouldn't end up hurting anyone else.

Mom was at the kitchen table when I came out, waiting for me. Dad wasn't around. He worked the graveyard shift at UPS and often slept till the middle of the afternoon. Usually, I'd see him only at dinner and on weekends. That's not to say he was happily oblivious when it came to my life; Mom might know me better, but Dad had no problem doling out punishments if he thought I was slacking, or if Mom complained. I'd gotten one D in science two years ago, and it was the last bad grade I'd ever received.

"Big day," Mom greeted me as I tossed the backpack on the counter and opened the fridge, reaching for the orange juice. "Are you sure you know the way to your new school?"

I nodded. "I've got it set to my phone's GPS. It's not that far. I'll be fine."

She hesitated. I knew she didn't want me driving there alone, even though I'd worked my butt off saving up for a car. The rusty, gray-green pickup sitting next to Dad's truck in the driveway represented an entire summer of work—flipping burgers, washing dishes, mopping up spilled drinks and food and vomit. It represented weekends spent working late, watching other kids my age hanging out, kissing girlfriends, tossing away money like it fell from the sky. I'd earned that truck, and I certainly wasn't going to take the freaking bus to school.

But because Mom was watching me with that sad, almost fearful look on her face, I sighed and muttered, "Do you want me to call you when I get there?"

"No, honey." Mom straightened, waving it off. "It's all right, you don't have to do that. Just…please be careful."

I heard the unspoken words in her voice. Be careful of Them. Don't attract their attention. Don't let Them get you into trouble. Try to stay in school this time.

"I will."

She hovered a moment longer, then placed a quick peck on my cheek and wandered into the living room, pretending to be busy. I drained my juice, poured another glass, and opened the fridge to put the container back.

As I closed the door, a magnet slipped loose and pinged to the floor, and the note it was holding fluttered to the ground. Kali demonstration, Sat., it read. I picked it up, and I let myself feel a tiny bit nervous. I'd started taking kali, a Filipino martial art, several years ago, to better protect myself from the things I knew were out there. I was drawn to kali because not only did it teach how to defend yourself empty-handed, it also taught stick, knife and sword work. And in a world of dagger-toting goblins and sword-wielding gentry, I wanted to be ready for anything. This weekend, our class was putting on a demonstration at a martial arts tournament, and I was part of the show.

If I could stay out of trouble that long, anyway. With me, it was always harder than it looked.

Starting a new school in the middle of the fall semester sucks.

I should know. I've done all this before. The struggle to find your locker, the curious stares in the hallway, the walk of shame to your desk in your new classroom, twenty or so pairs of eyes following you down the aisle.

Maybe third time's the charm, I thought morosely, slumping into my seat, which, thankfully, was in the far corner. I felt the heat from two dozen stares on the top of my head and ignored them all. Maybe this time I can make it through a semester without getting expelled. One more year—just give me one more year and then I'm free. At least the teacher didn't stand me up at the front of the room and introduce me to everyone; that would've been awkward. For the life of me, I couldn't understand why they thought such humiliation was necessary. It was hard enough to fit in without having a spotlight turned on you the first day.

Not that I'd be doing any "fitting in."

I continued to feel curious glances directed at my corner, and I concentrated on not looking up, not making eye contact with anyone. I heard people whispering and hunched down even more, studying the cover of my English book.

Something landed on my desk: a half sheet of notebook paper, folded into a square. I didn't look up, not wanting to know who'd lobbed it at me. Slipping it beneath the desk, I opened it in my lap and looked down.

U the guy who burned down his school? it read in messy handwriting.

Sighing, I crumpled the note in my fist. So they'd already heard the rumors. Perfect. Apparently, I'd been in the local paper: a juvenile thug who was seen fleeing the scene of the crime. But because no one had actually witnessed me setting the library on fire, I was able to avoid being sent to jail. Barely.

I caught giggles and whispers somewhere to my right, and then another folded piece of paper hit my arm. Annoyed, I was going to trash the note without reading it this time, but curiosity got the better of me, and I peeked quickly.

Did u really knife that guy in Juvie?

"Mr. Chase."

Miss Singer was stalking down the aisle toward me, her severe expression making her face look pinched behind her glasses. Or maybe that was just the dark, tight bun pulling at her skin, causing her eyes to narrow. Her bracelets clinked as she extended her hand and waggled her fingers at me. Her tone was no-nonsense. "Let's have it, Mr. Chase."

I held up the note in two fingers, not looking at her. She snatched it from my hand. After a moment, she murmured, "See me after class."

Damn. Thirty minutes into a new semester and I was already in trouble. This didn't bode well for the rest of the year. I slumped farther, hunching my shoulders against all prying eyes, as Miss Singer returned to the front and continued the lesson.

I remained in my seat after class was dismissed, listening to the sounds of scraping chairs and shuffling bodies, bags being tossed over shoulders. Voices surged around me, students talking and laughing with each other, gelling into their own little groups. As they began to file out, I finally looked up, letting my gaze wander over the few still lingering. A blond boy with glasses stood at Miss Singer's desk, rambling on while she listened with calm amusement. From the eager, puppy-dog look in his eyes, it was clear he was either suffering from major infatuation or was gunning for teacher's pet.

A group of girls stood by the door, clustered like pigeons, cooing and giggling. I saw several of the guys staring at them as they left, hoping to catch their eye, only to be disappointed. I snorted softly. Good luck with that. At least three of the girls were blonde, slender and beautiful, and a couple wore extremely short skirts that gave a fantastic view of their long, tanned legs. This was obviously the school's pom squad, and guys like me—or anyone who wasn't a jock or rich—had no chance.

And then, one of the girls turned and looked right at me.

I glanced away, hoping that no one noticed. Cheerleaders, I'd discovered, usually dated large, overly protective football stars whose policy was punch first, ask questions later. I did not want to find myself pressed up against my locker or a bathroom stall on my first day, about to get my face smashed in, because I'd had the gall to look at the quarterback's girlfriend. I heard more whispers, imagined fingers pointed my way, and then a chorus of shocked squeaks and gasps reached my corner.

"She's really going to do it," someone hissed, and then footsteps padded across the room. One of the girls had broken away from the pack and was approaching me. Wonderful.

Go away, I thought, shifting farther toward the wall. I have nothing you want or need. I'm not here so you can prove that you're not scared of the tough new kid, and I do not want to get in a fight with your meathead boyfriend. Leave me alone.

"Hi."

Resigned, I turned and stared into the face of a girl.

She was shorter than the others, more perky and cute than graceful and beautiful. Her long, straight hair was inky-black, though she had dyed a few strands around her face a brilliant sapphire. She wore sneakers and dark jeans, tight enough to hug her slender legs, but not looking like she'd painted them on. Warm brown eyes peered down at me as she stood with her hands clasped behind her, shifting from foot to foot, as if it was impossible for her to stay still.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 114 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 114 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    After Ethan Chase's sister Megan left and made her home in the I

    After Ethan Chase's sister Megan left and made her home in the Iron Realm, Ethan has spent his time figuring out how to stay away from it. He wants nothing to do with the Iron Realm or the Fey. He has rules he lives by, the most important being to avoid them and never let them know you are there. Ethan has been able to see the Fey ever since he can remember. To Ethan, they are nothing but trouble and have terrorized him his whole life, causing him to get into trouble time after time. He finds himself at a new school, yet again, as a result of the havoc these fairies caused at his old one. Ethan is 17 years old now, he's a loner and likes to keep to himself, keeping everyone at arms length, never getting close to anyone. This has worked for Ethan, well at least until he met Kenzie, then his world kind of turned upside down. When strange and threatening new beings begin to enter into Ethan's realm, and the magical beings living there begin to mysteriously disappear, Ethan must choose between his and Kenzie's safety, and going somewhere he swore he never would. He winds up finding himself in the middle of an adventure that will change things forever.

    I love fantasy, so I was excited to be able to read The Lost Prince, which is the first book in The Call of the Forgotten Series. Some of the characters from the Iron Fey books, make an appearance in this novel, and there are also quite a few new characters. I must say that I read The Lost Prince before the Iron Fey books, and I absolutely loved it. I didn't feel like I was missing anything by not reading the Iron Fey Series first, but, of course, I immediately went out and bought the entire Iron Fey Series because I was dying to read more. However, it was not something that required reading the previous books to enjoy, and I really did enjoy it. I liked Ethan, and he proved to be a very strong male lead in this story. He was kind of hard, but I understood where he was coming from. He was really hot to, even though he didn't seem to know it. He has the whole bad boy thing going on, and I love bad boys. The other characters in the book were great and so fun to get to know. You can read a little bit about them below. The story is filled with magic, adventure, some danger, and some really sweet romance. All you Iron Fey Series fans are definitely going to want to read this book. Julie Kagawa has done an outstanding job in providing readers with another epic fantasy to sink their teeth into. If you are a fan of fantasy, fey, magic, adventure, a little danger, and romance, then this is one book you will want to check out.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I fell as** over elbows for Meghan, Ash and Puck throughout the

    I fell as** over elbows for Meghan, Ash and Puck throughout the first 4 books and the Novellas. When I discovered there would be a new chapter in this world I almost came unglued! Thanks to Netgalley I was approved for an ARC of this book. I finished it in less than 24 hours it was that good! Not only is it a spin-off of the other books but it features Meghan's brother ETHAN! It starts off with Ethan as a teen in high school desperately trying to be normal after his ordeal in the Fey realm. He meets up with a half Fey named Todd who can't help but dabble in making bargains with the fey to prank his high school bullies. Poor Ethan gets roped into helping him and the adventure begins! Needless to say Todd gets apprehended by a new type of Fey no one has heard of. Mackenzie, One of the popular girls at school follows Ethan on the day he is chased into the NeverNever and ends up right alongside him in the fight to find Todd. They fall right into the hands of everyones favorite cait sith Grimalkin!!! I love this cat! He talks, he rolls his eyes and he takes his sweet a** time when he answers your questions! I usually hate cats because you have to scoop their crap from a box and dispose of it. I don't like wiping my own a** much less a cat but Grim requires no maintenance! Grim explains he is to lead Ethan and Mackenzie to Meghan in the Iron Court upon their arrival. Once there, Ethan is reunited with his long lost sister but he is bitter towards her for abandoning her human family to rule the Iron Kingdom. He informs everyone about the new Fey that are kidnapping half breeds and exiles. Meghan instructs Ethan to stay within the Iron Court so she can protect him but a new Fey boy named Keirran helps them sneak away. I love how reminiscent Keirran and Ethan are to Puck and Ash. It had the feel of the Three Musketeers. Keirran leads everyone to the exile queen Leanansidhe, where they enlist her help in figuring out the newest threat to The fey! Did anyone else picture Leanansidhe as the evil queen from ONCE UPON A TIME? That is all I could think whenever she would come onto the scene. (BTW Lana Parilla does a fantastic job on that show!)

    Ethan discovers a family secret that made me choke on my gum for gasping in surprise! I felt so bad for Ethan. OMG! He lost his sister, his life was hectic and everyone believed him to be a bad apple. I wanted to wrap my arms around him and tell him everything will be alright! Of course they all get into more trouble than you can shake a stick at and the drama surrounding the trio is Koo Koo! We find out there is more to Keirran than meets the eye, and NO! He isn't an Autobot. When they find the Queen of these new Fey she wants Keirran on her side and manages to get inside his head a little. Once everything comes out in the wash we are left with plot twists aplenty, somewhat unresolved issues (leading into the next book I'm sure) and an overall sense that what we just read was a beautiful escape from our own crazy ass existence! I enjoyed this book tremendously and once again I am left captivated for the next installment in the series! You have to read this simply because I say so!


    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 8, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I enjoyed the Iron Fey series, so I was looking forward to this

    I enjoyed the Iron Fey series, so I was looking forward to this spin-off featuring the adorable Ethan, Meghan's older brother. Unfortunately, I was a bit disappointed in this one. The Lost Prince just did not live up to any of the Iron Fey books, in my opinion. While this novel did have the characters I know and love from the Iron Fey series, the new characters weren't terrific additions. The plot itself was good, and the writing, of course, was fantastic. However, the characters really killed it for me. 

    Ethan is the narrator, and he was such a cute kid in the Iron Fey series that I was really excited to read a book from his perspective. Apparently dealing with the fey problems his whole life really ruined his personality, though, because he was whiny and super emo. I just did not enjoy reading things from his perspective at all. I understand, to an extent, the bitterness and anger, but he was just really overboard with it. I think if he'd been a tiny bit more positive, then I would have enjoyed the book more. 

    The secondary characters were more likable than Ethan. Kenzie was okay. She's not my favorite female lead ever, but she was okay. She was a strong enough character, and she was fairly brave considering all she had to go through. Kiernan was pretty awesome and was reminiscent of the characters from the Iron Fey series, but still not quite as good. He was, by far, my favorite new character, though. 

    Puck, Meghan, Ash, and GRIMALKIN!!! were all back in this one, just in smaller doses. I freaking love Grimalkin. Ahem. They've all grown since the end of the Iron Fey series, and it was interesting to see how much stronger Meghan was. She really grew into her role as a queen. Ash was still bad ass as ever, and Puck was still as puckish as ever. Grimalkin was still the best character in the world!!!! Anyway, it was good to see them. I enjoyed them much more than the new characters. 

    The world-building and writing were top-notch, which I've come to expect from Kagawa. The plot was pretty good. There were no huge surprises. I didn't expect the ending with Kenzie, but that didn't shock me. However, I never felt bored, and I kept turning the pages. The romance was okay, but it moved a bit too quickly for my liking. Also, the chemistry that Ash and Meghan have was not really there for Ethan and Kenzie. The romance wasn't totally cold, it just wasn't as hot as Ash and Meghan were. 

    Overall, I'd recommend this book to anyone who loved the Iron Fey series. If you're a fan of that series, then you're sure to like this new one, too!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 27, 2012

    I just have to say, before I say anything else, that The Lost Pr

    I just have to say, before I say anything else, that The Lost Prince reminded me why I fell in love with the Iron Fey series in the first place.

    What I Liked: 1) Ethan. Remember the bright-eyed, curious little boy from Meghan's story? Well, he's back and now he's a 17 year old bad-ass martial artist with a serious attitude. It's funny because when I was reading the first books I just wanted to protect him. Now he's a dangerous bad boy with an attitude that I think most girls can hardly resist (especially on paper). Anyone who loved the first books will definitely enjoy seeing what Ethan has grown up to become. 2) Back into the Fey. Heh - that was supposed to be funny. The Fey world of both the Nevernever and the parts of the human world that they inhabit are fascinating, and it's only become more so now. For me, the differences are tangible, and I'm amazed that Miz Kagawa has brought these places to life so vividly that just turning the page from one place to the next feels like stepping through a portal to another world. 3) Old friends. Some of my old favorites have made a reappearance in The Lost Prince, and I'm so very glad they did, because I didn't think it would be the same without them. I won't say who for spoiler reasons, but that's something fans can look forward to. 4) A whole new story. 13 years later, it's a completely different story. This isn't some continuation of what Meghan had going on when she had her first encounter with the Nevernever, no this is Ethan's story in his own right and had Meghan and others not been mentioned, it could be it's own wonderful, standalone series. 5) The love story. I don't think a faery tale is incomplete without a romantic angle, and Miz Kagawa delivers. I was holding my breath at one point waiting for The Moment. You know, the one where they realize...it's good. Trust me.

    What I Didn't Like: I loved it all. I'm not wild about the cover though.

    Overall Thoughts: Again, I'll say this book reminded me of what I loved about the series. The writing is incredible, the characters are rich, interesting, and have such great back stories that they become your friends instead of characters on a page. And the plot keeps you completely engaged from page one. I can't say how awesome I thought this book was and absolutely cannot wait for the next book!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 25, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    The story picks up 15 years after Megan has left to become the I

    The story picks up 15 years after Megan has left to become the Iron Queen in Nevernever. Ethan has been trying for those past years to forget the Fey even exist and live a normal life, but he might as well forget that as things spiral out of control when he's attacked by Fey he's never heard or, or seen before. Leaving him no choice, Ethan is forced to disappear into Nevernever with a fellow student in tow, and the adventure truly begins.

    I got this book free from publisher in exchange for an honest review, now let me say that I have never read the Iron Fey series from Julie Kagawa, but now I really want to! The book as itself, though clearly a spin-off from the aforementioned series can certainly stand on it’s own. Like any good book there were moments that I laughed, got angry (at other characters because Ethan was angry at them.) and was shocked. I even cried. (This is rare. The last time I actually burst out in tears when reading a book, was at the death of Fred in Harry Potter.)

    The story sucked me in from the word GO and I never put it down, except when I was forced to charge my tablet! When I finished it, I looked up at the time and in shock saw it read 4:56AM! Only a good book can make me loose track of time and The Lost Prince is no exception.

    I highly recommend anyone to read this, whether they’ve read the Iron Fey series or not. It’s an excellent read and I'll be looking out for the next!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 20, 2013

    The reluctant Prince of the Iron Kingdom It doesn't seem that lo

    The reluctant Prince of the Iron Kingdom It doesn't seem that long ago since I read the first book in the series and tiny Ethan was a mere babe in the Fae woods. Now he is all grown up and facing Fae trouble of his own.
    It feels as if Kagawa is turning this boat round and heading in a new direction with a strong set of fresh characters that are connected to the old ones. It is a clever way to breathe new life into this popular series.
    That also means we will be seeing less of the favourites, if this book is any indication of the future storylines. Puck and Ash only reared their heads for a short time in this book. Although I am happy to say Grimalkin popped up quite a bit it lacked his usual witty repertoire.
    Using the younger generation, Ethan and Kierran with female sidekicks, to generate a new interest has emboldened Kagawa to create another interesting sub-plot. The Iron Queen wanders into the waters of being one of the bad guys. She now confers with past enemies to make the right choice for her kingdom. Just one thing wrong with that, what's right for the kingdom isn't always right for her family. Suddenly The Iron Queen is no different from the Summer or Winter Royalty.
    Doesn't that make her the enemy?
    I received a free copy of this book for my review from NetGalley.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 9, 2013

    Julie Kagawa is a great writer, who is able to create these fant

    Julie Kagawa is a great writer, who is able to create these fantastical worlds with such memorable, one-of-a-kind characters. The Lost Prince is no exception. Oh, how I thrilled at seeing Ash, Meghan, and Puck again, even if it was all too brief. Grimalkin is back, as well. That silly, riddle-speaking cat!
    Ethan Chase, Meghan's younger brother, is the hero in this one. He is a little bit of a bad boy here, which makes him all the more intriguing. I really thought after Ash's story that Mrs. Kagawa might be all out of ideas with the Fey and the Iron Realm, but I stand corrected. Kudos to her for giving us another wonderful story with beloved characters. Fans of the Iron Fey series will cheer for this new series, but don't fret if you haven't read the others because you shouldn't feel too confused with this one.  

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 8, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Fantastic Fantasy!

    Sometimes spinoffs of an original series can be a little lackluster, but not so with The Lost Prince! This story belongs to Ethan, Meghan's younger brother all the way!

    Ethan must learn to come to terms with dealing with the loss of his sister Meghan, to her duties as the Iron Queen. This is also Ethan's story about dealing with all of the repercussions of being able to see the fey, but being human at the same time. He has anger issues, trust issues, and feels the pressure of his parents' worry over 'losing' him, as they did his sister.

    When a friend of his, who happens to be half-fey goes missing and he is attacked by fey, he uses the 'magical' coin given to him by Meghan to enlist her help in Nevernever. Problem is, he was not alone when he escaped, alongside him is Kenzie, an annoying school photographer/journalist who has seen too much!

    Together they embark on a magical journey that started out only as a mission to save Todd and ended up being a mission that 'saved' Ethan from his own 'demons.'

    The author has done a wonderful job of worldbuilding, setting the scenes, sounds, sights and smells! She also has the male teen angst thing down pat, Ethan's emotions were those of a teen male caught between being a child and being an adult! When Ethan was tense, I was tense! The book is THAT good!

    Kenzie was strong, stronger than Ethan, more mature and had her own secrets that when revealed, Ethan was able to look outside of his 'me world' to want to comfort her! I loved seeing him grow up emotionally!

    Although there were still many old characters, (who have matured), I wonder how many of the new ones introduced will carry on throughout this new series!

    I'm hooked! I can't wait for the next book's adventure into Nevernever, villains, heroes and all!

    This copy was provided by NetGalley and Harlequin UK in exchange for an honest review!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2012

    I am a cat...



    I am not sure I can wait till May 2013 for the next book. This was an awesome series and I am glad Julia is going to keep on with the series. I read the series twice and the second time was even better because I picked up on things I missed inmy 1st read. But after all I am only human, and not a cat.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2012

    Ahhhhh!!!

    Just finished it! MELT!!!!!!! If u havent read it then go right now and buy it this second. Im seriouse. Go.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2012

    Awsooomeeeeeeeee!!!!!

    This series is the most amazing series ever!! Well... no tthe best, but one of the best

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2014

    amazing book one of my favorite

    While I was reading the book I just kept saying "Oh, bady Ethan what happened?" I remember him when he was only for 4 years old. so cute, always wanting Megan's attention. But now he has a jerkish attitude and it makes me sad that he turned out so brooding. And his hate for his older sister is so strong, he couldn't even be happy to see her for the first time in Years. (I want the sweet, adorable Ethan back)

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  • Posted March 14, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Wildly imaginative world building and a great continuation of an

    Wildly imaginative world building and a great continuation of an already solid series

    My Rating: 4 Stars

    Good Reads Rating: 4.08

    Series: The Iron Fey: Call of the Forgotten #1

    Genre: YA Fantasy/Paranormal

    Pages: 377

    Publisher: Harlequin Teen

    Check it out: Good Reads | Amazon | Barnes and Noble

    Good Reads Summary:

    Don’t look at Them. Never let Them know you can see Them.


    That is Ethan Chase’s unbreakable rule. Until the fey he avoids at all costs—including his reputation—begin to disappear, and Ethan is attacked. Now he must change the rules to protect his family. To save a girl he never thought he’d dare to fall for.

    Ethan thought he had protected himself from his older sister’s world—the land of Faery. His previous time in the Iron Realm left him with nothing but fear and disgust for the world Meghan Chase has made her home, a land of myth and talking cats, of magic and seductive enemies. But when destiny comes for Ethan, there is no escape from a danger long, long forgotten.

    I’m a huge fan of Kagawa’s writing. I have the Iron Fey series sitting on my shelf, and I really enjoyed The Immortal Rules. Suffice to say I was thrilled that she was continuing the Iron Fey series with Meghan’s younger brother, Ethan.

    The biggest thing that struck me about The Lost Prince was how hard it must be to write a new series in a world that readers have already come to love. I really enjoyed Ethan’s story, but I was continually reminded of how much more I enjoyed Meghan, Ash, and Puck’s story. Our favorite trio just seemed more interesting, more endearing, and more entertaining than Ethan, Kenzie, and Kierran. This was most apparent when Puck, Ash and Meghan themselves showed up in The Lost Prince; they lit up the pages in a way that our current hero was unable to. I found myself almost giddy when the Iron Queen appeared, or when there was a short exchange between Puck and Ash. Of course, after four books, you feel as if beloved characters are good friends, so it was hard to see a new hero take the spotlight.



    All that sap being said, this book does a fantastic job continuing the world and the story that Kagawa created through the trio in the first books. All the imagination and creative storytelling is there, illustrating the dark and fascinating Nevernever. The main conflict is a follow up from The Iron Fey, centering around the mysterious beings known as The Forgotten. They fit perfectly into the world Kagawa has shaped, making it feel less and less like a spin-off the deeper our heroes get into trouble.

    As I said previously, I didn’t like the main characters as much as Ash, Meghan, and Puck. In some ways that’s not fair, because if I hadn’t read the original series, I wouldn’t know any better. It seems as though everyone in this book is seriously damaged. Ethan has to keep everyone at arm’s length (if not farther) to keep them safe from the fey. He’s a jerk to everyone, but he loathes himself for it.



    You really feel bad for him, having to constantly look over his shoulder, making sure the fey aren’t messing with him. The only person stubborn enough to break through his armor is Kenzie, who refuses to back down even when he is repeatedly rude to her. Kenzie was fiery, brave…I liked her. She responded to all the crazy faerie stuff well; she was shocked, astonished, disbelieving, and then she realized there was nowhere to go but forward, so she just went with it. I liked her a lot. Her confession near the end seemed completely out of the blue, and I wasn't really sure why Kagawa chose to add it. I'll be interested to see how it affects the story later on.

    Kierran. I really really really wanted to love him. And I liked his character, don’t get me wrong. But he was too…static. A little boring. I wanted him to be more Puck-ish, with a huge personality, probably because Ethan was quite Ash-like with his brooding and his bad-boy behavior, and I was looking for the foil that I just didn’t quite find in Kierran. But then again, I’m comparing the two series, which isn’t fair. Kierran is a very romantic character, a nice mix between Ash and Puck, so there’s that.



    Grimalkin plays a huge part in The Lost Prince, which made me exceptionally happy. It was fun having our favorite feline at the helm again, mysteriously leading our heroes around.

    Fans of Kagawa’s should NOT miss this book, and it’s a book that I think will satisfy lovers of The Iron Fey series. I don’t think it’s absolutely necessary to read The Iron Fey first, but it would certainly give you a lot of back story, as there are four books worth of material there to explain the Nevernever and give Ethan’s history. I’m very excited about The Iron Traitor, which is sitting on my Kindle, waiting to be read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2014

    Ethan

    Ethan is cute, but Ash is WAY hotter:)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2014

    Better in the end

    I absolutely love this series! After reading through all the other books preceding this one in the series, I found myself a bit disappointed in the complete character swap in this one. It took me a while to get into The Lost Prince but it did happen, just closer to the end than the beginning. All I can say is hang in there because this book is the lowest point out of the series ( books 1-6 I did not read the novellas ) . That being said, although it was my least favorite book out of all of them, it was not a bad read and it gets better in The Lost Traitor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2014

    Julie Kagawa does it again!!!

    The Lost Prince is another amazing book related to the Iron Fey series. You do not have to read the first four iron fey books plus the three short stories first, but the characters, settings and events in that series are present in this spin off type series and will boost understanding. They are all great reads. (I kinda wish ash was in this book more.) Anyway, I dont want to spoil anything but this book is amazing and completely worth it! Enjoy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2014

    Amazing!

    I absplutely love Etjan's perspective. I liked the plot of this book, and the new characters, as well as the quick glimpses we are given of the other characters. You should definitely read the Iron Prophecy before starting this book since it explains quite a bit. The only thing that annoyed me about this book was that no one, even those wjo went on Ash's quest knew what the ghostly fey wrre. It was just so obvious that it got on my nerves. But, all in all, I abdolutrly loved this book!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2013

    Best book ever!!

    I thought that the series was over unntil I saw this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2013

     My Book Review The Lost Prince By: Julie Kagawa Title of review

     My Book Review
    The Lost Prince By: Julie Kagawa
    Title of review:
    Number of stars (4 ½)




    Introduction
    The Lost Prince is a action and the theme is about something that is there but its really not there to see. 




    Description and summary of content
    There is this guy named Ethan Chased and he meets a girl named Kenzie and she is suspicious about Ethan and Ethan lives in a different world that humans can’t see of what he can see.Kenzie and Ethan they go on an adventure to find Ethan’s lost friend Toby that the fey has kidnapped.




    Evaluation
    This book is a fantasy and its fiction but the part i liked about this book was when they got to the fery world, Kenzie an Ethan had stumbled upon a grey cat called a grimwalkin with really big gold eyes and the cat would smile and talk and it scared Kenzie and Ethan.But this is a really good  book for any age and for any person who would like a book that is almost like Alice and the wonderland.




    Conclusion
    This is my final statement about the Lost Prince that i love this book and i really
     enjoy this book because it gets you in a magical and adventure mood.I recommend this book to everyone who would like the feeling of having a magical and a adventure mood in their life.

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  • Posted October 18, 2013

    Great sequel to the other Iron Fey series.

    I am a visual reader in my mind. I invision all the characters, settings, and interactions as I read. The Lost Prince continues the plot of the Iron Queen and her entourage through greater adventures. I couldn't put it down. If you are an Iron Fey reader, this book is a must have.

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