The Lost Riots

( 2 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - MacKenzie Wilson
Hope of the States lost one of their best friends during the recording of The Lost Riots. They could have given it all up to mourn the loss of founding guitarist James Lawrence, but their dedication to one another and to their music could not be disregarded. The majestic soundscape that is The Lost Riots honors the band's personal bond and cherishes the memory of their late friend, but that's merely a stepping stone. Sam Herlihy's bittersweet vocal delivery during the piano-driven ballads "Don't Go to Pieces" and "Sadness on My Back" matches the heartache previously displayed by Starsailor's James Walsh. He's even a touch like Richard Ashcroft, a working-class poet in ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - MacKenzie Wilson
Hope of the States lost one of their best friends during the recording of The Lost Riots. They could have given it all up to mourn the loss of founding guitarist James Lawrence, but their dedication to one another and to their music could not be disregarded. The majestic soundscape that is The Lost Riots honors the band's personal bond and cherishes the memory of their late friend, but that's merely a stepping stone. Sam Herlihy's bittersweet vocal delivery during the piano-driven ballads "Don't Go to Pieces" and "Sadness on My Back" matches the heartache previously displayed by Starsailor's James Walsh. He's even a touch like Richard Ashcroft, a working-class poet in progress much like Ashcroft was during his latter years with the Verve. With their tragic loss aside, there's a lilting sense of comfort surrounding the 13-song set. Hope of the States compose a youthful, rebellious spark found in those who raise a fist against corporate establishment. The dynamic of love and loss will never rest, and it bursts with a millions fibers and a few tears as Hope of the States channel their frustration for the man versus man equation. Herlihy's heavy-hearted voice and Mike Siddell's atmospheric violin arrangements during "Enemies/Friends" immediately set the anthemic tone of The Lost Riots. Words as simple as "Come on people/keep your friends close/your enemies won't matter/in the end" makes it all seem so easy. Hope of the States encourage those people to take a stand against anything that challenges faith. It's just their sharp, yet sensitive approach that makes The Lost Riots emerge honest and true. Even the more ambitious numbers like "The Red the White the Black the Blue," a downpour of acoustic guitars, pianos, and percussion, and the old-timey jangle "George Washington" don't come off as pretentious or overly earnest. It's likely that Hope of the States are firm in questioning a bullying United States, but the songs are open-ended enough so that they could be about anything to anyone. Genuine sincerity is the key to their success, and The Lost Riots breaks apart the darkness of personal tragedy for a joyful daybreak. Herlihy softly croons "I've seen from broken people smile" at the start of "Black Dollar Bills." If that's not enough to impress you, the soaring exclamation of "Nehemiah" is promising. The double-cross of emotions holds The Lost Riots together, thus making Hope of the States' first introduction an impressionable one.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/5/2004
  • Label: Sony
  • UPC: 827969288610
  • Catalog Number: 92886

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Hope of the States Primary Artist
Helen Tunstall Harp
Neil Martin Strings
James Lawrence Electric Guitar
Chris Worsey Cello
Richard George Violin
Reiad Chibah Viola
Millennia Strings Strings
Joe Auckland Trumpet
Anthony Theaker Synthesizer, Guitar, Stick, Pixiephone
Simon Jones Drums, Beat Box
Samuel Herlihy Vocals
Amy Little Cello
Una OKane Strings
Kenneth "Spider Webb" Rice Strings
Technical Credits
Jack Clark Engineer
Ken Thomas Producer, Audio Production
Paul Wilson Sound Effects, Contributor
Hope of the States Composer
Anthony Theaker Sound Effects
Simon Jones Sound Effects
James Loughtry Vocal Engineer
Type2error Package Concept
Tim Young Mastering
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Best of 2004

    This album takes awhile to sink in; the singer of the group has one of the strangest, most unique voices that I have heard, and the songs themselves are difficult to grasp at first. After the first few releases, however, you begin to realize that Hope of the States has created something special, by far the best rock album of 2004. Every track on the album is high quality and unique in its own way. While there may be no standout tracks, that's simply because there are no bad songs on the entire record. Hope of the States, unlike Keane or Travis or Snow Patrol, can truly hold up next to such groups as Coldplay and Radiohead, and their debut album is an amazing experience to take.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Best Album of 2004, hands-down

    This band is truly something special. Never have I heard anything as epic and powerful as this album. They quickly became my favorite band, especially after seeing them live. I have played this album over and over. It's so interesting that it never gets tiring. It starts off with "The Black Amnesias", an instrumental of epic proportions. There are no words that can describe the intensity of this piece. Some notable songs are, "Enemies/Friends", "TRTWTBTB", and "Nehemiah". I HIGHLY recommend this album.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews