The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and Other Observations

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and Other Observations

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by T. S. Eliot
     
 

This book contains the poetry of T. S. Eliot, including:

THE LOVE SONG OF J. ALFRED PRUFROCK
PORTRAIT OF A LADY
PRELUDES
RHAPSODY ON A WINDY NIGHT
MORNING AT THE WINDOW
THE BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT
AUNT HELEN
COUSIN NANCY
MR. APOLLINAX
HYSTERIA
CONVERSATION GALANTE
LA FIGLIA CHE PIANGE

"The Love Song of…  See more details below

Overview

This book contains the poetry of T. S. Eliot, including:

THE LOVE SONG OF J. ALFRED PRUFROCK
PORTRAIT OF A LADY
PRELUDES
RHAPSODY ON A WINDY NIGHT
MORNING AT THE WINDOW
THE BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT
AUNT HELEN
COUSIN NANCY
MR. APOLLINAX
HYSTERIA
CONVERSATION GALANTE
LA FIGLIA CHE PIANGE

"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock", commonly known as "Prufrock", is a poem by T. S. Eliot, begun in February 1910 and published in Chicago in June 1915. Described as a "drama of literary anguish," it presents a stream of consciousness in the form of a dramatic monologue, and marked the beginning of Eliot's career as an influential poet. With its weariness, regret, embarrassment, longing, emasculation, sexual frustration, sense of decay, and awareness of mortality, "Prufrock" has become one of the most recognized voices in modern literature.

Composed mainly between February 1910 and July or August 1911, the poem was first published in Chicago in the June 1915 issue of Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, after Ezra Pound, the magazine's foreign editor, persuaded Harriet Monroe, its founder, that Eliot was unique: "He has actually trained himself AND modernized himself ON HIS OWN. The rest of the promising young have done one or the other, but never both." This was Eliot's first publication of a poem outside school or university.

In November 1915, the poem—along with Eliot's "Portrait of a Lady," "The Boston Evening Transcript," "Hysteria," and "Miss Helen Slingsby"—was published in London in Pound's Catholic Anthology 1914–1915, which was printed by Elkin Mathews. In June 1917, The Egoist, a small publishing firm run by Dora Marsden, published a pamphlet entitled Prufrock and Other Observations (London), containing twelve poems by Eliot. "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" was the first in the volume.

Eliot's notebook of draft poems, published posthumously in 1996 by Harcourt Brace, has the dates "July–Aug. 1911" at the end of the poem marking him as 22 when the poem was completed. The notebook includes 38 lines from the middle of a draft version of the poem. This section, now known as Prufrock's Pervigilium, describes the "vigil" of Prufrock through an evening and night. The Harvard Vocarium at Harvard College recorded Eliot's reading of Prufrock and other poems in 1947, as part of their on going series of poetry readings by their authors.

In the drafts, the poem had the subtitle "Prufrock among the Women." Eliot said "The Love Song of" portion of the title came from "The Love Song of Har Dyal," a poem by Rudyard Kipling, published in the 1888 collection Plain Tales from the Hills. The form of Prufrock's name is like the name that Eliot was using at the time: T. Stearns Eliot. On the origin of the name "Prufrock", there was a Prufrock-Litton Company, a furniture store, in St. Louis at the time Eliot lived there. In a 1950 letter, Eliot said, "I did not have, at the time of writing the poem, and have not yet recovered, any recollection of having acquired this name in any way, but I think that it must be assumed that I did, and that the memory has been obliterated."

In context, the epigraph refers to a meeting between Dante and Guido da Montefeltro, who was condemned to the eighth circle of Hell for providing counsel to Pope Boniface VIII, who wished to use Guido's advice for a nefarious undertaking. This encounter follows Dante's meeting with Ulysses, who himself is also condemned to the circle of the Fraudulent. According to Ron Banerjee, the epigraph serves to cast ironic light on Prufrock's intent. Like Guido, Prufrock had intended his story never be told.

Thomas Stearns Eliot OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965) was a publisher, playwright, literary and social critic and "arguably the most important English-language poet of the 20th century." Although he was born an American, he moved to the United Kingdom in 1914 (at age 25) and was naturalised as a British subject in 1927 at age 39.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940015553727
Publisher:
Balefire Publishing
Publication date:
10/04/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
683,332
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Thomas Stearns Eliot OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965) was a publisher, playwright, literary and social critic and "arguably the most important English-language poet of the 20th century." Although he was born an American, he moved to the United Kingdom in 1914 (at age 25) and was naturalised as a British subject in 1927 at age 39.

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