The Lowland

( 66 )

Overview

A New York Times Book Review Notable Book • A Time Top Fiction Book • An NPR "Great Read" • A Chicago Tribune Best Book • A USA Today Best Book • A People magazine Top 10 Book • A Barnes and Noble Best New Book • A Good Reads Best Book • A Kirkus Best Fiction Book • A Slate Favorite Book • A Christian Science Monitor Best Fiction Book • An Apple Top 10 Book

National Book Award Finalist and shortlisted for the ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$15.91
BN.com price
(Save 43%)$27.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (82) from $2.37   
  • New (25) from $9.99   
  • Used (57) from $2.37   
The Lowland

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.99
BN.com price

Overview

A New York Times Book Review Notable Book • A Time Top Fiction Book • An NPR "Great Read" • A Chicago Tribune Best Book • A USA Today Best Book • A People magazine Top 10 Book • A Barnes and Noble Best New Book • A Good Reads Best Book • A Kirkus Best Fiction Book • A Slate Favorite Book • A Christian Science Monitor Best Fiction Book • An Apple Top 10 Book

National Book Award Finalist and shortlisted for the 2013 Man Booker Prize

The Lowland is an engrossing family saga steeped in history: the story of two very different brothers bound by tragedy, a fiercely brilliant woman haunted by her past, a country torn apart by revolution, and a love that endures long past death. Moving from the 1960s to the present, and from India to America and across generations, this dazzling novel is Jhumpa Lahiri at the height of her considerable powers.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Namesake weaves an artful tale of two Indian brothers bound by tragedy and a brilliant woman haunted by her past. With its strong characters and polarities, The Lowland unfolds with gripping effect, drawing you into situations which at first seemed so distant. Now in trade paperback and NOOK Book.

Publishers Weekly
Lahiri’s (The Namesake) haunting second novel crosses generations, oceans, and the chasms that despair creates within families. Subhash and Udayan are brothers, 15 months apart, born in Calcutta in the years just before Indian independence and the country’s partition. As children, they are inseparable: Subhash is the elder, and the careful and reserved one; Udayan is more willful and wild. When Subhash moves to the U.S. for graduate school in the late 1960s, he has a hard time keeping track of Udayan’s involvement in the increasingly violent Communist uprising taking place throughout West Bengal. The only person who will eventually be able to tell Subhash, if not quite explain, what happened to his brother is Gauri, Udayan’s love-match wife, of whom the brothers’ parents do not approve. Forced by circumstances, Gauri and Subhash form their own relationship, one both intimate and distant, which will determine much of the rest of their adult lives. Lahiri’s skill is reflected not only in her restrained and lyric prose, but also in her moving forward chronological time while simultaneously unfolding memory, which does not fade in spite of the years. A formidable and beautiful book. 350,000-copy announced first printing. Agent: Eric Simonoff, WME Entertainment. (Sept.)
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2013-09-01
A tale of two continents in an era of political tumult, rendered with devastating depth and clarity by the Pulitzer Prize–winning author. The narrative proceeds from the simplicity of a fairy tale into a complex novel of moral ambiguity and aftershocks, with revelations that continue through decades and generations until the very last page. It is the story of two brothers in India who are exceptionally close to each other and yet completely different. Older by 15 months, Subhash is cautious and careful, not prone to taking any risks, unlike his impetuous brother Udayan, the younger but the leader in their various escapades. Inseparable in their Calcutta boyhoods, they eventually take very different paths, with Subhash moving to America to pursue his education and an academic career in scientific research, while Udayan becomes increasingly and clandestinely involved in Indian radical militancy. "The chief task of the new party was to organize the peasantry," writes the novelist (Unaccustomed Earth, 2008, etc.). "The tactic would be guerrilla warfare. The enemy was the Indian state." The book's straightforward, declarative sentences will ultimately force the characters and the reader to find meaning in the space between them. While Udayan characteristically defies his parents by returning home with a wife he has impulsively courted rather than submitting to an arranged marriage, Subhash waits for his own life to unfold: "He wondered what woman his parents would choose for him. He wondered when it would be. Getting married would mean returning to Calcutta. In that sense he was in no hurry." Yet crisis returns him to Calcutta, and when he resumes his life in America, he has a pregnant wife and, soon, a daughter. The rest of the novel spans more than four decades in the life of this family, shaped and shaken by the events that have brought them together and tear them apart--"a family of solitaries [that]...had collided and dispersed." Though Lahiri has previously earned greater renown for her short stories, this masterful novel deserves to attract an even wider readership.
From the Publisher

“Poised, haunting, exquisitely effective storytelling. . . . Lahiri is one of our most beautiful chroniclers of the aching disjunctions of emigration and family.”
San Francisco Chronicle

“Exquisite. . . . Lahiri explores here what she has always explored best: the fragile inner workings of her characters. . . . An American master.”
Philadelphia Inquirer

“[Lahiri’s] finest work so far. . . . At once unsettling and generous. . . . Shattering and satisfying in equal measure.”
The New York Review of Books

“Poignant. . . . There is an important truth here—that life often denies us understanding, and sometimes all there is to hold on to is our ability to endure.”
—NPR

“Intriguing. . . . Brim[s] with pain and love and all of life’s profound beauty.”
O, The Oprah Magazine

“Mesmerizing.”
The Washington Post Book World

“In The Lowland, we are all emigrants, not from one country to another but from the present to the future. . . . Tremendous.”
—Lev Grossman, Time 

“A masterful work that shines with brilliant language. . . . [Lahiri] has created a masterpiece.”
—Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Lahiri is an elegant stylist, effortlessly placing the perfect words in the perfect order time and again so we’re transported seamlessly into another place.”
Vanity Fair

“Divided consciousness has been Lahiri’s recurrent theme. . . . This time, Lahiri daringly redraws the map. . . . [Her] prose is blunter, less mellifluous: here worlds, new and old, contain terrors.”
The Atlantic

“The lowland [of the title] serves as Lahiri’s telling metaphor for the dark, dank, weedy places that haunt our lives. . . . In its quiet intensity, [The Lowland] reminds us of the triumphant fiction of Alice Munro and William Trevor.”
Newsday

“A classic story of family and ideology at odds, love and risk closely twined. . . . An author, at the height of her artistry, spins the globe and comes full circle.”
Vogue

“A great American writer.”
Chicago Tribune

“Memorable, potent. . . . Lahiri has reached literary high ground with The Lowland.”
USA Today

“A master of dramatic turns, but not in the conventional sense. She lets tension build slowly until something snaps. What she twists is you. . . . Lahiri shows that a twist can be even more devastating when you’ve been afraid that it might happen all along. A”
Entertainment Weekly

“A must-read. . . . Delivers Lahiri’s trademark lyrical prose woven with a fast-paced narrative and indelible characters.”
Slate

“Lahiri returns confidently to the themes that have earned her critical praise, an eager audience and a Pulitzer Prize. . . . [Here] she adds a historical dimension that creates a vital, intriguing backdrop. . . . [The] story is unique, but it’s also universal, a reminder of the past’s pull on us all.”
The Miami Herald

“Expansive and intimate. . . . Lahiri’s writing is precise and restrained. . . . Loyalty and betrayal, lies and forgiveness, filial responsibility and abandonment, the choices and sacrifices we make to find our way in the world are beautifully wrought in this novel.”
The Oregonian

“Subtle but devastating. . . . The themes of this beautifully written novel may be grand—love, ­revolution, desertion—but it’s an intimate tale that offers no easy answers.”
Parade

“The kind of book that stays with you long after you finish it. . . . Full of sharp insights about marriage and parenthood, politics and commitment.”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“Delicately harrowing. . . . Lahiri has a devastatingly keen ear for the tensions and misunderstandings endemic in our closest relationships.”
Bloomberg News

Library Journal
Pulitzer Prize winner Lahiri's (The Interpreter of Maladies) unparalleled ability to transform the smallest moments into whole lives pinnacles in this extraordinary story of two brothers—so close that one is "the other side" of the other—coming of age in the political tumult of 1960s India. They are separated as adults, with Subhash, the elder, choosing an academic career in the United States and the more daring Udayan remaining in Calcutta, committed to correcting the inequities of his country. Udayan's political participation will haunt four generations, from his parents, who renounce the future, to his wife and his brother, who attempt to protect it, to the daughter and granddaughter who will never know him. VERDICT Lahiri is remarkable, achieving multilayered meaning in an act as simple as "banging the edge of the lid three or four times with a spoon, to break the seal"; her second novel and fourth title is deservedly one of this year's most anticipated books. Banal words of praise simply won't do justice; perhaps what is needed is a three-word directive: just read it. [See Prepub Alert, 3/18/13.]—Terry Hong, Smithsonian BookDragon, Washington, DC
The Barnes & Noble Review

This is one of those times when I wish that the author of a novel had issued a statement to reviewers as to what she considers acceptable for us to reveal in discussing her book. Jhumpa Lahiri's The Lowland hinges on an event revealed a quarter of the way through the book and a couple of decades into the life of the central character. That event gives rise to circumstances that make up the substance of the book, but to reveal even the most necessary of those seems somehow out of order. The publisher takes the movie trailer approach: Two brothers bound by tragedy. A fiercely brilliant woman haunted by her past. A country torn by revolution. And, I, myself, could continue in the same vein: A story of dislocation, estrangement, and loneliness, of loss and regret, duty and grief. A deeply moving tale of family ties that strangle as much as bind. All true, but I couldn't go on like this without passing out from a surfeit of abstraction.

Instead, I am just going to be ruthless, and you can stop after the next couple of paragraphs if you want to come to the book in a state of innocence. (I will alert you at that point.) I must say, however, that though the novel's plot is essential, the strength lies in Lahiri's particular vision of life, which here, as elsewhere in her work, is shaded with loneliness; and also by her evocation of place, and her skill in conveying her characters' predicaments and feelings in simple, spare prose.

At novel's start, Subhash and Udayan, two brothers separated in age by fifteen months, live with their parents in a little neighborhood in Calcutta in the 1950s. Nearby is a small mosque that has survived partition, and the Tolly Club, a sporting club established in colonial days and still highly exclusive. Also adjacent are two ponds lying side by side that merge to become one in the rainy season. The ponds, it becomes clear as the story unfolds, represent, in some sense, the fates of the brothers.

We first meet the boys breaking into the grounds of the Tolly Club to hit golf balls, a venture that is the brainchild of the younger, Udayan, the leader and more outgoing and intrepid of the two — though when they are caught, it is Subhash who is beaten. Both boys attend university, but Udayan gets caught up in the Maoist Naxalite movement, whose activities included assassinations and bombings. Meanwhile Subhash travels to the U.S. to study for a doctorate in oceanography in Rhode Island, accepting the idea that he will return home afterward, enter an arranged marriage, and live a traditional Indian life. This is the point where spoiler-averse readers will wish to stop.

Subhash's life is lonely, and even his thoughts of home become unsettled when his brother writes to say that he has married without their parents' permission and very much to their dismay, though the young couple are living with them. Still, Subhash carries on with his studies and even enters into an affair, though he knows — more uneasiness — that it has no future. Then, toward the beginning of his third year of study, a telegram arrives: Udayan has been killed. It emerges that he was shot by the police for revolutionary doings, his body never restored to the family. Returning home to offer comfort, Subhash discovers that Udayan's wife, Gauri, despised by his parents, is pregnant and only barely tolerated in the house as a servant. Subhash does what he considers the right thing and marries her himself, taking her off to Rhode Island. Somehow he feels that their shared love of Udayan is enough to build on.

With this we can say the story really begins, and in some ways it amounts to a tale of excruciating endurance for both Subhash and Gauri. The two of them are confined in a marriage that is poisoned by her inability or unwillingness to accept what has happened. The bootless nature of Udayan's political activities are horribly evident: "Udayan had given his life to a movement that had been misguided, that had caused only damage, that had been ruthlessly dismantled. The only thing he had altered was what the family had been."

A daughter, Bela, is born, but Gauri neglects her, nursing her own sorrow and frustration, and, finally, secludes herself from the family, taking up study toward what becomes a doctorate in philosophy. Subhash, who has achieved a university teaching position, has to look after the child, after everything in fact. Lahiri is as sympathetic in her portrayal of Gauri as anyone could be, and we see that this character's feeling are perfectly genuine, but that does not disguise the fact that she is a self-absorbed monster, consumed with her own plight and utterly indifferent — at best — to the people she should care most about.

I have certainly given enough of the plot away, suffice it to say there are further developments, for Gauri, for Bela, and for Subhash himself. Every one of them has the ring of truth, so embedded are they in a meticulously conjured context and offered from the differing points of view of each member of this unhappy family. This is a slow-building, indeed slow-moving novel, simple and powerful in style but lacking the elastic tension and clarity of Lahiri's short fiction. Still, the accumulating movement of feeling that forges and unforges relationships is acutely observed. Further, Lahiri renders with subtlety the hybrid nature of the alienation that afflicts Subhash and Gauri — in part particular to their individual personalities and circumstances, in part the product of being immigrants. The novel is a painful one, though it is not entirely bleak, for Lahiri does, by the end, provide an honest reckoning, some recompense, and a redemption. Of sorts.

Katherine A. Powers reviews books widely and has been a finalist for the Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing from the National Book Critics Circle. She is the editor of Suitable Accommodations: An Autobiographical Story of Family Life: The Letters of J. F. Powers, 1942–1963.

Reviewer: Katherine A. Powers

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307265746
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/24/2013
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 28,587
  • Product dimensions: 6.72 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Jhumpa  Lahiri
Jhumpa Lahiri is the author of three previous works of fiction: Interpreter of Maladies, The Namesake and, most recently, Unaccustomed Earth. A recipient of the Pulitzer Prize, a PEN/Hemingway Award, the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award and a Guggenheim Fellowship, she was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2012.

Biography

Award-winning writer Jhumpa Lahiri has spent most of her life traveling between countries. Born in London and raised in Rhode Island, she visited Calcutta regularly with her family, often for months at a time. Neither a tourist nor a native, her ties to India are as strong as her ties to the U.S. This feeling of free-floating between cultures, plus her experience growing up in an immigrant household, permeates her characters, settings, and themes.

A serious student, Lahiri excelled at school. As a child, she wrote endlessly in notebooks and reported for her school newspaper, but she did not seriously begin writing fiction until after graduation from Barnard College. She went on to receive three Master's degrees and a PhD, all from Boston University, but had no real interest in academics. She managed to get a few stories published and was eventually accepted to the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown -- which put her on the road to finding an agent and selling her first book, a collection of short fiction cryptically entitled Interpreter of Maladies.

When Interpreter of Maladies hit the bookshelves in 1999, readers and critics fell in love with Lahiri's luminous prose and fully realized characters. Moving dexterously between first- and third-person narration and unfolding from the perspectives of both men and women, the nine stories in the anthology showcase Lahiri's flexibility as a writer. She navigates the emotional terrain between two cultures, Indian and American, with grace and deftness; and although she sets her tales in both countries, India always resonates in the hearts of her characters, no matter where they live. In 2000, Lahiri received the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for Fiction -- an honor rarely bestowed on a first-time author.

In 2003, Lahiri published her debut novel. The story of a first-generation Bengali-American boy and his family, The Namesake became an international bestseller. The New York Times named it a Notable Book of the Year; several publications included it in their annual roundups of best reads; and in 2007, Indian-born director Mira Nair turned it into a critically acclaimed feature film.

Jhumpa Lahiri continues to explore both sides of the cultural divide with passion, clarity, and elegance. Writing in her unique voice, she brings into focus the grey areas of life, creating seamlessly crafted plots and three-dimensional characters that draw readers back again and again.

Good To Know

Like the rest of her family, Lahiri has a (private) "pet name" and a (public) "good name." When she started school, her teachers decided that Jhumpa, her pet name, was the easier one to pronounce, and she has been called that in public ever since, something many of her relatives find odd.

A major turning point for Lahiri's writing career came when she was accepted into the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

Lahiri is married to journalist Alberto Vourvoulias, a Guatemalan of Greek ancestry. Their son, Octavio, is learning to speak English, Bengali, and Spanish.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      1967
    2. Place of Birth:
      London, England
    1. Education:
      B.A., Barnard College; M.A., Ph.D., Boston University

Read an Excerpt

Normally she stayed on the balcony, reading, or kept to an adjacent room as her brother and Udayan studied and smoked and drank cups of tea. Manash had befriended him at Calcutta University, where they were both graduate students in the physics department. Much of the time their books on the behaviors of liquids and gases would sit ignored as they talked about the repercussions of Naxalbari, and commented on the day’s events.

The discussions strayed to the insurgencies in Indochina and in Latin American countries. In the case of Cuba it wasn’t even a mass movement, Udayan pointed out. Just a small group, attacking the right targets.

All over the world students were gaining momentum, standing up to exploitative systems. It was another example of Newton’s second law of motion, he joked. Force equals mass times acceleration.

Manash was skeptical. What could they, urban students, claim to know about peasant life?

Nothing, Udayan said. We need to learn from them.

Through an open doorway she saw him. Tall but slight of build, twenty-three but looking a bit older. His clothing hung on him loosely. He wore kurtas but also European-style shirts, irreverently, the top portion unbuttoned, the bottom untucked, the sleeves rolled back past the elbow.

He sat in the room where they listened to the radio. On the bed that served as a sofa where, at night, Gauri slept. His arms were lean, his fingers too long for the small porcelain cups of tea her family served him, which he drained in just a few gulps. His hair was wavy, the brows thick, the eyes languid and dark.

His hands seemed an extension of his voice, always in motion, embellishing the things he said. Even as he argued he smiled easily. His upper teeth overlapped slightly, as if there were one too many of them. From the beginning, the attraction was there.

He never said anything to Gauri if she happened to brush by. Never glancing, never acknowledging that she was Manash’s younger sister, until the day the houseboy was out on an errand, and Manash asked Gauri if she minded making them some tea.

She could not find a tray to put the teacups on. She carried them in, nudging open the door to the room with her shoulder.
Looking up at her an instant longer than he needed to, Udayan took his cup from her hands.

The groove between his mouth and nose was deep. Clean-shaven. Still looking at her, he posed his first question.

Where do you study? he asked.

*
Because she went to Presidency, and Calcutta University was just next door, she searched for him on the quadrangle, and among the bookstalls, at the tables of the Coffee House if she went there with a group of friends. Something told her he did not go to his classes as regularly as she did. She began to watch for him from the generous balcony that wrapped around the two sides of her grandparents’ flat, overlooking the intersection where Cornwallis Street began. It became something for her to do.

Then one day she spotted him, amazed that she knew which of the hundreds of dark heads was his. He was standing on the opposite corner, buying a packet of cigarettes. Then he was crossing the street, a cotton book bag over his shoulder, glancing both ways, walking toward their flat.

She crouched below the filigree, under the clothes drying on the line, worried that he would look up and see her. Two minutes later she heard footsteps climbing the stairwell, and then the rattle of the iron knocker on the door of the flat. She heard the door being opened, the houseboy letting him in.

It was an afternoon everyone, including Manash, happened to be out, and she’d been reading, alone. She wondered if he’d turn back, given that Manash wasn’t there. Instead, a moment later, he stepped out onto the balcony.

No one else here? he asked.

She shook her head.

Will you talk to me, then?

The laundry was damp, some of her petticoats and blouses were clipped to the line. The material of the blouses was tailored to the shape of her upper torso, her breasts. He unclipped one of the blouses and put it further down the line to make room.

He did this slowly, a mild tremor in his fingers forcing him to focus more than another person might on the task. Standing beside him, she was aware of his height, the slight stoop in his shoulders, the angle at which he held his face. He struck a match against the side of a box and lit a cigarette, cupping his whole hand over his mouth when he drew the cigarette to his lips. The houseboy brought out biscuits and tea.

They overlooked the intersection, from four flights above. They stood beside one another, both of them leaning into the railing. Together they took in the stone buildings, with their decrepit grandeur, that lined the streets. Their tired columns, their crumbling cornices, their sullied shades.

Her face was supported by the discreet barrier of her hand. his arm hung over the edge, the burning cigarette was in his fingers. The sleeves of his Punjabi were rolled up, exposing the veins running from his wrist to the crook of the elbow. They were prominent, the blood in them greenish gray, like a pointed archway below the skin.

There was something elemental about so many human beings in motion at once: walking, sitting in buses and trams, pulling or being pulled along in rickshaws. One the other side of the street were a few gold and silver shops all in a row, with mirrored walls and ceilings. Always crowded with families, endlessly reflected, placing orders for wedding jewels. There was the press where they took clothes to be ironed. The store where Gauri bought her ink, her notebooks. Narrow sweet shops, where trays of confections were studded with flies.

The paanwallah sat cross-legged at one corner, under a bare bulb, spreading white lime paste on stacks of betel leaves. A traffic constable stood at the center, in his helmet, on his little box. Blowing a whistle and waving his arms. The clamor of so many motors, of so many scooters and lorries and busses and cars, filled their ears.

I like this view, he said.

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

1. “Udayan was the one brave enough to ask them for autographs…He was blind to self-constraints, like an animal incapable of perceiving certain colors. But Subhash strove to minimize his existence, as other animals merged with bark or blades of grass” (p. 11). How do the differences between the boys both strengthen and strain the tie between them?

2. Does Subhash’s decision to make it  “his mission to obey (his parents), given that it wasn’t possible to surprise or impress them. That was what Udayan did” (p. 11) follow a pattern common among siblings?  What part do their parents play in fostering the roles each boy assumes?

3. What does Udayan’s reaction to Subhash’s decision to go to America (p. 30) and Subhash’s admission that he wanted to leave Calcutta “not only for the sake of his education but also . . . to take a step Udayan never would” (p. 40) convey about the balance between admiration and envy, support and competition, that underlies their relationship?  Do you think that Udayan is manipulative, or does Subhash misread him (p. 31)?

4. What aspects of the immigrant experience are captured in Subhash’s first impressions of Rhode Island (p. 34)?  How do his feelings about school and about his roommate, Richard, bring to light both his pleasure and his uncertainties about his new independence? In what ways does Udayan’s letter add to his ambivalence about the choice he has made (p. 47)?

5. What does Subhash’s affair with Holly convey about his transition to life in America (pp. 65-83)? What does it reveal about his emotional ties to his old life and family? 

6. Why does the author describe the courtship and marriage of Udayan and Gauri from Gauri’s perspective (pp. 51-61)?  To what extent does Gauri’s independence, rare for women in India, influence their decision to marry?

7. How do the descriptions of Calcutta (pp. 88-90, 91-2) and Subhash’s first glimpse of his parents (p. 91) capture the complex feelings Subhash experiences on returning home? How do the brothers’ parents’ expectations and beliefs shape their treatment of Gauri?

8. What emotions lie behind his mother does his mother’s reaction to Gauri’s pregnancy (p. 114)? Is it understandable in light of Gauri’s behavior and manner?  Is Subhash right to believe that the only way to help the child is to take Gauri away (p. 115)? What other motivation might he have for marrying his brother’s widow?

9. From the start, Gauri and Subhash react differently to Bela and to parenthood. Gauri thinks,  “Bela was her child and Udayan’s; that Subhash, for all his helpfulness, for the role he’d deftly assumed, was simply playing a part. I’m her mother . . . I don’t have to try as hard” (p. 146).  Although Subhash has a close, loving relationship with his daughter, he is troubled by his marriage: “Almost five years ago they had begun their journey as husband and wife, but he was still waiting to arrive somewhere with her. A place where he would no longer question the result of what they’d done” (p. 159). What is the source of the underlying uneasiness of their marriage?  To what extent are they haunted by their attachments to Udayan? What other factors make Gauri feel resentful and trapped? Is Subhash partially responsible for her unhappiness?  How does Subhash’s insistence on hiding the truth from Bela influence Gauri’s behavior and the choices she makes?

10. How does the portrait of the brothers’ mother, Bijoli, enhance the novel’s exploration of the repercussions of the family tragedy (pp. 179-89)?  What effect does his visit to Calcutta and its many reminders of Udayan have on Subhash—as a son, a brother, and a father?

11. After Gauri the family, what does Bela rely on to make sense of the situation and to create a life for herself? Is her reclusiveness natural, given her family history, although much of it is unknown to her? In what ways do her decisions about her education and her work represent her need to separate and distinguish herself from her parents? 

12. Why, despite his pride in Bela and his confidence in her affection, does Subhash feel “threatened, convinced that . . . Udayan’s influence was greater” (p. 225)?  How might Bela’s life have been different had Udayan raised her?

13. The novel presents many kinds of parents—present and absent, supportive and reluctant. What questions does the novel raise about the challenges and real meaning of being a parent?

14. What do you find most striking or surprising about Gauri’s reflections on her life (p. 231-40)? “She had married Subhash, she had abandoned Bela. She had generated alternative versions of herself, she had insisted at brutal cost on these conversations. Layering her life only to strip it bare, only to be alone in the end” (p. 240). Is this an accurate and just self-assessment, or is Gauri too hard on herself—and if so, why?

15. Despite his accomplishments and relative contentment, Subhash remains in the grip of the deception that has dominated his life: “He was still too weak to tell Bela what she deserved to know. Still pretending to be her father . . . The need to tell her hung over him, terrified him. It was the greatest unfinished business of his life” (p. 251-52). Why does Bela’s pregnancy move him to reveal the truth? Were you surprised by Bela’s reaction? How does learning about Udayan and the story of her parents’ marriage?

16. The keeping of secrets plays a large part in the novel, from the facts of Bela’s parentage to Gauri’s long-hidden guilt about her role in Udayan’s fateful actions. To what extent are the continued deceptions fed by the love and sense of loyalty Gauri and Subhash feel toward Udayan even years after his death?  Do they also serve Gauri’s and Subhash’s self-interest?

17. The details of the family’s history emerge through various retellings set in different times and seen from different perspectives. Why do you think Lahiri chose to tell the story in this way? How does this method increase the power of the narrative? Do your opinions of and sympathies for the characters change as more information is revealed?

18. Before reading The Lowland, were you aware of the Naxalite movement? (The group remains active: on May 25, 2013, Naxalite insurgents attacked a convoy of Indian National Congress leaders, causing the deaths of at least twenty-seven people.) What insights does Lahiri offer into the development of radical political groups? What role does history play in the creation of the Naxalite movement and, by extension, other uprisings around the world?   What parallels do you see between the events described in the novel and recent activities in the Egypt and other countries torn by internal dissension and violence?

19. In an interview, Lahiri said, “As Udayan’s creator, I don’t condone what he does. On the other hand, I understand the frustration he feels, his sense of injustice, and his impulse to change society” (NewYorker.com, June 3, 2013) Does the novel help you see more clearly the reasons for destruction and deaths revolutionary forces perpetrate to attain their goals?  How do you feel about Udayan after reading the novel’s last chapter?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 66 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(12)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 66 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2013

    It shocks me that anyone could find this book anything less than

    It shocks me that anyone could find this book anything less than breathtaking. Admittedly, the first third or so of the book takes some getting used too; Lahiri is leaping into territory that will be simply unfamiliar with many readers, and the time she takes to lay her foundeation will likely strike some as tedious.
    That being said, once you are through the first 4 chapters or so, the book simply takes flight. The winding journey of each of her characters is so painful, so human, I could not pit the book down, and at times, I openly want to weep. I honestly think this book is as stunning as Lahiri's other work, perhaps her greatest, most significant work yet. If you have not read this cover to cover, I would do so as soon as you can.

    12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2013

    How could people not finish reading this book?  It's a intriguin

    How could people not finish reading this book?  It's a intriguing story that is character driven within some interesting settings.  All in all, a good read!   

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 25, 2013

    I was unable to read past the first 4 or 5 chapters of this book

    I was unable to read past the first 4 or 5 chapters of this book, despite a love of Lahiri's earlier works. There seemed not to be a story line, but pure descriptions of the two main characters without a hint of where the story was going. A big disappointment.

    9 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2013

    Finely etched

    Each sentence is carefully measured, resulting in a haunting beauty. I found myself yearning to fill the void and find resolution for several characters. This book is a gem.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 5, 2013

    The story is breathtakingly beautiful. The relationship between

    The story is breathtakingly beautiful. The relationship between the two brothers, their closeness as children, the differences between them, and the paths their lives ultimately take. We learn why they make the choices that lead their lives in different directions, each trying to do what he believes is right and true and meaningful. The language is gorgeous; I was drawn in from the first pages and the descriptions of the childhood activities of the brothers. The reader can almost feel the air they breathe. There are some slow parts later in the book when time passes and we need to arrive at later times to understand the full background, but once we get there, the story picks up again and draws to a very satisfying conclusion.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2013

    Disappointed

    I was really looking forward to reading this book as I have loved the other books she has written. This book did not measure up to her writing standards and l found the beginning to be slow and her amazing way of telling a story was not thrrr.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2013

    Awesome

    Lahiri has another great one

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2013

    Disappointed

    I looked forward to this book because of the high praise and mention of literary prizes. I gave it a trial of about 100 pages but could not connect emotionally. The characters just seemed lifeless. I decided not to waste nay more of my time.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2013

    I was looking forward to this book and bought it in the first we

    I was looking forward to this book and bought it in the first week of it coming out, but was disappointed; I read it till the end (with some effort) and I have to agree with the other reviewers - not her best, weak writing, sometimes very simplified retelling of India's history, characters are not developing, unappealing, I had no feeling for them. On the other hand, I loved "and the mountains echoed" by Khaled Hosseini.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2013

    Did Not Disappoint

    This is a beautifully told story. It's one of those books that i was sad to finish.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    I agree with those who said this book is nothing but descriptive

    I agree with those who said this book is nothing but descriptive text - at least for the first several chapters. It is written as if an external judge tells you who the characters are instead of letting them reveal who they are through their interactions and dialogue.  When page 1 begins with a description of their childhood and by page 32 (I have the Nook version) they are finishing the last of their college exams, it is sure sign that the author has failed to give the reader the foundation s/he needs to feel something about the main characters. I will finish the book because it is my book club's selection for this month, but not because I have any interest in the outcome.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    Don Do not waste your time

    How does this book get the praise it does? Just another family saga with the most unlikable women ever. Kept waiting for it to get better which never happened . Total sleeper.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2013

    Interesting Lives

    Ms. Lahiri brings the multi-generation story of a Bengali family to life. The initial chapters describing the growth of two brothers in the post-British ruled India, and the radicalization of one is compelling. It's particularly interesting in the context of the Cold War as third world intelligentsia try to bring about Marxist reforms to redistribute wealth and property to the the populus. Her depiction of the older brother's journey to America to pursue a PhD. and later to live in America is spot on if anyone who went to university in the mid-60's knew such a student. Finally, there are the questions raised of family, obligation, morality and commitment. An entertaining read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 10, 2013

    Best book I have read in some time!

    This is a great novel. I found it brilliantly written and frequently moving. I will probably be giving it as my book of the year at Christmas.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2013

    Disappointing

    First chspters should pull one into the tale despite excellent wriiting this is dated perhaps i should have more patience india is so large and complicated have no point of reference kipling reader

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 28, 2014

    This is the first book of Lahiri's that I wasn't able to get int

    This is the first book of Lahiri's that I wasn't able to get into. She's a beautiful writer but the story didn't amount to much for me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 4, 2014

    Mildly Interesting - Extremely Distant

    I was drawn along enough to read the entire book so it could not have been that horrible. However, when I was finished I felt I knew next to nothing about the characters. There is literally no dialogue and large periods of time pass -- decades in some cases -- without learning a thing about a given character. Everything about the novel demonstrates the distance between the characters with the effect of causing the reader to feel distant from them, too. The most engaging part of the novel is the beginning, when the brothers are young boys, but all too quickly they grow apart. In the end, you find out what happened, but you don't really care.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2014

    Gary

    Fun
    L

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2014

    White cracker

    Wwwwwhhhhhhhhaaaaazzzzz uuuuuiuuuuppppppppppppp

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2014

    Kiss your hand

    Kiss your hand

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 66 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)