The Loyola Treasury of Saints: From the Time of Jesus to Present Day

The Loyola Treasury of Saints: From the Time of Jesus to Present Day

3.3 4
by David Self, Amanda Hall
     
 

Both children and adults will enjoy this beautiful collection of over 100 saint biographies. The Loyola Treasury of Saints  by David Self contains vibrant stories, illustrations, and photographs that detail the lives of saints from the time of Jesus to today. Many of the saint biographies are accompanied by short explanations of historical and

Overview

Both children and adults will enjoy this beautiful collection of over 100 saint biographies. The Loyola Treasury of Saints  by David Self contains vibrant stories, illustrations, and photographs that detail the lives of saints from the time of Jesus to today. Many of the saint biographies are accompanied by short explanations of historical and cultural settings as well as anecdotes about the times in which the saints lived.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Addressing a broad audience of Christians, this comprehensive catalogue offers a rich collection of biographical stories, legends and illustrations that detail the lives of the saints. Broadly defining a saint as "a very good or holy person," Self groups the stories in chronological order, beginning with Mary and ending with Oscar Romero, the archbishop of El Salvador who was killed in 1980 (and who has not been canonized), and including Orthodox as well as Roman Catholic saints. A final section introduces angels and archangels, "God's messengers." The stories stand alone but also refer to one another, so that the book can be browsed as well as enjoyably read straight through. The design telegraphs information quickly. Headings encapsulate messages associated with the saint (Augustine: "Make Me Good, but Not Yet"; Julian of Norwich: "All Shall Be Well"). Boxed sections provide additional anecdotal or historical information (an entry on Spiridion contains a section explaining the Council of Nicea). Throughout, the writing is inviting and almost conversational. The story of Paul, for example, begins, "It was the stoning of Stephen that started it." A variety of illustrations supplements each entry: paintings and stained glass renditions of lives of the saints, photographs of artifacts and historic locations, architectural renderings of ancient buildings, as well as pictures and symbols (an ancient scroll near the clay jar in which it was stored; the chi-rho emblem of Constantine). These tales of ordinary people who lived in extraordinary, holy ways provide both a wonderfully entertaining read and inspiring examples of courage and goodness. Ages 8-14. (Mar.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780829417852
Publisher:
Loyola Press
Publication date:
03/28/2003
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
750,298
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.30(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
8 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

David Self is a respected author, broadcaster, and public speaker who has more than twenty years of experience writing about literature and religion. He lives in Great Britain near the English cathedral city of Peterborough.

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The Loyola Treasury of Saints: From the Time of Jesus to Present Day 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Big disappointment! After reading previous reviews, I was eager to receive this book as a gift for my grandkids, most of whom are in elementary school. The art work in this book mainly consists of museum-type illustrations which are not appealing or attractive to most younger children. (Trust this grandma of ten, little kids identify with "realistic" looking people!) Also, the final chapter has non-Catholic persons such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. I feel this would be confusing to little kids who are supposedly reading a book about CATHOLIC SAINTS and potentially FUTURE Catholic Saints (non-Catholics such as Dr. King would not fall into this category). As a history book for teens and adult Christians of various denominations, it would be okay. But I certainly wouldn't purchase it for any of my grandkids - too confusing and too "bland" on the artwork. I will be returning it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This beautifully illustrated book is perfect for First Communion and Confirmation gifts. Beautifully written. Perfect for the Christian library.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Starlight64 More than 1 year ago
I bought this book as a Christmas gift for a family with four girls named after saints, ranging in age from 6-16, and I believe they all liked it. It is a gorgeously illustrated book - much bigger than I expected - the size of a coffee table book. Each saint gets at least a page dedicated to his or her story. The family I gave it to reads about a saint each night at dinner to learn moer about them. It would also be good in a Christian classroom. It's written for a grade level around 4th grade or above, but the lovely pictures make it appropriate for younger children. It tells each saint's story so that it captures children's (and adults) attention. For anyone interested in the lives of the saints, I think it's an excellent book.