The Lucia Poems: Breaking Bread with the Darkness, Book 2

The Lucia Poems: Breaking Bread with the Darkness, Book 2

by Jimmy Santiago Baca
     
 
The Lucia Poems is the second of four books by American Book Award recipient Jimmy Santiago Baca that is part of a series titled Breaking Bread With The Darkness. The Lucia Poems are about Lucia's father remembering the roads that bright him to the present time in whih daughter, lucia, emanates a special lift, gives oof the illumination that startled his soul into a

Overview

The Lucia Poems is the second of four books by American Book Award recipient Jimmy Santiago Baca that is part of a series titled Breaking Bread With The Darkness. The Lucia Poems are about Lucia's father remembering the roads that bright him to the present time in whih daughter, lucia, emanates a special lift, gives oof the illumination that startled his soul into a recognition of gratitude for her-- he opens the baggage of events over the last thirty years, events that almost killed him, swallowed him in their darkness, but which he somehow survived, and now he approaches or speaks into the present and future, speak to his daughter with a redemptive and courageous conviction that perhaps he made it, because his dream was to have ehrm he endured because she was coming to him in the future, his dream little girl, who know walks at his side to school every day and who he bows laughing nd serenely imbued by her star-dust presence, he the father is happy and fulfilled, nothing that all the experiences in the poems were worth enduring because of her arrival.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
" . . . the sheer passion that drives Baca's novel is undeniable." -- PW

"A Place To Stand is riveting, compelling, impossible to put down and highly recommended." -- Midwest Book Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781890932435
Publisher:
Asher, Sherman Publishing
Publication date:
09/15/2012
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
1,186,295
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.30(d)

Read an Excerpt

Aug. 25-10

I have been reading on Buddhism
To deal with the dark in me.
To be a good father to you
And nourish the cactus blossom you are, Lucia.
To teach you to keep your thorny spines intact
And alert for unwanted intruders,
To open your soul and heart to sun each morning
As if it were the first time opening,
First time seeing,
Touching and hearing the world.
Yesterday
We turned the garden hose on and I sprayed you and Esai,
You stood under the arc of bright water opened your arms under the umbrella of flashing waterfall and embraced each droplet with gusto, with dancing and spinning and running laughter,
while I thought of the floods in Pakistan five million homeless, farmers committing suicide,
while corporations buy up every acre to plant one type of corn, one type of beet, one type of strawberry-
when what your soul tells me is life is varied and multiplies a thousand times a minute into unique and singular blossoms of being,
your essence my sweet child,
is the wind-shredded tip of a prayer flag, wind snapping with innocent joy at the cold summit.
As if people were not starving, as if whole communities were not wiped out,
As if one hundred and fifty Mexican women were not raped yesterday by the cartels,
As if one's Hollywood ego was more important than life, than breath, than soul-
And I hear my friends saying, But Jimmy, the world has to go on,
Despite people wanting to deny the mosque so close to ground zero 9/11 site,
Despite 6000 murders in Juarez from Sinaloa/Juarez cartel madmen,
Despite all the cringing and gear-grinding mayhem
In the blood and home filled streets
Most of us react like cooing rooftop cage pigeons,
afraid of angering the award-givers, the approval-givers the acceptance-givers.
(Take for instance Seattle's Mexican slave trade,
it's booming, bigger than the gold rush,
"Get the Mexican 2 for 1 special”).

I know, just ignore it as most do, close my mind and heart to it.

After months of not mowing the lawn, I start up the lawnmower
And while you sit under the patio umbrella and watch me, Lucia
Everything is as it should be-the weeds, the tall grass, you sipping
Your lemonade, the sun in the blue sky,
you don't ask why so many weeds,
Why hasn't the lawn been cut all summer,
Just as when you change clothes a dozen times
Or you dance to your music in the sunroom,
Life

Meet the Author

Born in New Mexico of Indio-Mexican descent, Jimmy Santiago Baca was raised first by his grandmother and later sent to an orphanage. A runaway at age 13, it was after Baca was sentenced to five years in a maximum security prison that he began to turn his life around: he learned to read and write and unearthed a voracious passion for poetry. He is the winner of the Pushcart Prize, the
American Book Award, the International Hispanic Heritage Award and for his memoir A Place to Stand the prestigious International Award.

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