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The Lukacs Reader
     

The Lukacs Reader

by Arpad Kadarkay (Editor)
 

One of the greatest Marxist theorists of his generation, Georg Lukacs was a prolific writer of remarkably catholic, if moralistic, tastes. In The Lukacs Reader, his biographer Arpad Kadarkay represents the great range and variety of Lukacs's output. The reader includes, in original translations, and with introductory essays, Lukacs on: Kierkegaard,

Overview

One of the greatest Marxist theorists of his generation, Georg Lukacs was a prolific writer of remarkably catholic, if moralistic, tastes. In The Lukacs Reader, his biographer Arpad Kadarkay represents the great range and variety of Lukacs's output. The reader includes, in original translations, and with introductory essays, Lukacs on: Kierkegaard, Shakespeare, Ford, Strindberg, Ibsen, Wilde, Shaw, Gaughin, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, and Heidegger. Also collected are: the autobiographical essay 'On the Poverty of Spirit', material from Lukacs's diary, and such key articles as: 'Aesthetic Culture', 'The Ideology of Modernism', 'Bolshevism as an Ethical Problem', and 'Class Consciousness'. What emerges is a figure very much at the centre of European thought whose value to modern culture and philosophy differs markedly from that which received opinion generally admits.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This collection of essays emphasizes the romantic. It includes an early essay in which Lukacs compares the strangest of his own love affairs with Kerkegaard's, as well as essays on Stridberg, Ibsen, Wilde and Shaw." Leslie Armour, Library Journal

Library Journal
Georg Lukacs was a Marxist-humanistand a bourgeois romantic who once added "von" to his name. The romantic never died, and the Marxist was always unorthodox. That helps to explain why he is rivaled now only by Ernst Bloch as a Marxist worthy to be saved from the rubble of the political hopes of his fellow believers. This collection of essays emphasizes the romantic. It includes an early essay in which Lukacs compares the strangest of his own love affairs with Kierkegaard's, as well as essays on Strindberg, Ibsen, Wilde, and Shaw. There is an essay on Nietzsche that starts sympathetically and ends nastily with a portrait of Nietzsche as determined to destroy socialism and a serious but destructive essay on Heidegger. Two essays examine Marxist topics. One asks bluntly if good can be achieved through tyranny. The answer is "no." The second explores class consciousness and urges the proletariat to critical self-reflection. The balance could be better, but this book does bring together work still worth reading and conveys the curious concatenations of Lukacs's mind. General readers with a taste for ideas will find almost all of it readable.Leslie Armour, Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781557865717
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
11/14/1995
Series:
Wiley Blackwell Readers Series
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
6.09(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.67(d)

Meet the Author

The editor is the author of Georg Lukacs: Life, Thought and Politics (Blackwell Publishers, 1991) and is a Professor in the Department of Politics and Government at the University of Puget Sound.

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