The Mad Scientist's Daughter [NOOK Book]

Overview

There?s never been anyone - or anything - quite like Finn. He looks, and acts human, though he has no desire to be. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection. A billion-dollar construct, his primary task is to tutor Cat

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
The Mad Scientist's Daughter

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.49
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$6.99 List Price

Overview

There’s never been anyone - or anything - quite like Finn. He looks, and acts human, though he has no desire to be. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection. A billion-dollar construct, his primary task is to tutor Cat

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Nominated for the 2014 Phillip K. Dick Award.

Named a B&N Bloggers' Favorite Book of the Year, 2013.

“Cassandra Rose Clarke has delivered a novel that is brave enough to take on one of the largest issue’s confronting all of us today—just what exactly it means to be human in a time when the definition of such seems to alter almost daily in the face of whirlwind technological change. The Mad Scientist’s Daughter is a haunting, memorable, and very original love story, told in an alluringly graceful prose.”
Peter LaSalle, author of Tell Borges If You See Him: Tales of Contemporary Somnambulism

"one of the most heart-clenching and gut-wrenching love stories I have ever read ... an instant favorite with fantastic re-readability."
-Vicki, Open Book Society

"Fantastic character building and a truly classic love story make The Mad Scientist’s Daughter a literary classic for lovers of both genre fiction and classic romance."
-Catherine Russell, Functional Nerds

"With this second book, Clarke has cemented her status as a must-read author. The Mad Scientist’s Daughter is really something special."
-A Fantastical Librarian

“The characters are what drives this story, whether it’s Cat struggling through life, her mad yet grounded and caring father, the friends and lovers Cat meets throughout her life, or Finn, the android who doesn’t want to be human yet seems like the most perfect creation.”
Shades of Sentience

“I urge you to read this book, it will haunt you and stay with you for a long time. It is very hard to believe that this is only the author’s second novel – bravo Miss Clarke!”
Geek Syndicate

If you are looking for hearts, flowers and candle lit dinners you won’t find it here but if you are in the mood for a tear inducing, head shaking, heartbreaking, but ultimately uplifting love story, within an unusual setting and with a unique love interest, The Mad Scientist’s Daughter is for you.
-Caroline, Big Book Little Book

"The author captures the idea of lonely people circling around each other, coming together briefly and then separating again. I think it’s part of what makes this book so melancholy, but it also makes the times the characters do connect extra sweet."
- Tammy Sparks, Books, Bones & Buffy

"Even if you don’t consider yourself a science fiction fan READ THIS BOOK. It is gorgeous and thought provoking and fascinating. Even better – try and get someone else to read it at the same time. It’s a novel that demands to be talked about."
-More Than Just Magic

"Cat’s longing and desire for Finn is a force of nature, and the tragedy, and joy, of Cat and Finn’s romance will stay with you long after reading the last page."
-My Bookish Ways

"It's a neat premise and Clark examines the ramifications with the precision of a poet, eschewing the genre's typical preoccupation with science and opting instead for a dramatisation of the love affair. Hard SF aficionados be warned: this is SF for admirers of The Time Traveller's Wife."
-Eric Brown, The Guardian

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780857662668
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing, Limited
  • Publication date: 1/29/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 9,209
  • File size: 372 KB

Meet the Author

Cassandra Rose Clarke is a speculative fiction writer and occasional teacher living amongst the beige stucco and overgrown pecan trees of Houston, Texas. She is a graduate of the 2010 Clarion West Writers Workshop and holds a Masters degree in creative writing from the University of Texas at Austin. Her short fiction has appeared in Strange Horizons. The author lives in Houston, TX.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 17, 2013

    Cat Novak is the daughter of two cyberneticists.  She grew up wi

    Cat Novak is the daughter of two cyberneticists.  She grew up without much interaction with them or the outside world.  One day her father brought home an android named Finn.  Finn is unlike other “robots,” one of a kind, and he becomes Cat’s best (and really, only) friend.  Eventually, she falls in love with him, and while on some level she understands that he can feel emotions, she convinces herself that he does not have the capacity for love.  As Cat goes to school, then college, she encounters other people and has relationships with various men, but she always keeps drifting back to Finn.  She finally decides to marry a wealthy man that she does not love, yet she expects to be able to carry on with Finn as before.  However, Finn has other ideas.  As Cat’s life falls apart, she realizes that she has done Finn wrong, but is it too late for any kind of redemption?

    This book was set in an alternative America, after the “Disasters.”  Somehow the human population was greatly reduced, and humans began depending upon automatons and robots to help them rebuild society.   Quite a few social issues are brought out as, on the one hand, people consider androids like Finn “an abomination,” and on the other hand, people begin fighting for robot rights.  It does get a little creepy with the physical relationship between Finn and Cat.  In many respects, Cat is not a very likable character and essentially uses everyone to suit her own purposes.  However, you have to wonder how much of this was due to what was basically emotional neglect as a child.  Overall, this was an interesting exercise in the “what-ifs” of life with artificial intelligence.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 29, 2013

    Engrossing, touching, heartbreaking - a story that cements the a

    Engrossing, touching, heartbreaking - a story that cements the adage 'Love knows no boundaries'.

    I'm not usually one to sound sappy and melodramatic. In real life, I'd be the kind of person in your group of friends that you'd least expect to ever sound emotional. Hysteria and feelings are just not my turf, but this story - oh, this story brought out all the feels in me that I just don't know where to start!

    I suppose a fair warning is in order. I feel that whatever words I come up with cannot truly describe just what a gem this story is. This review is a mesh of the many things I felt in this roller coaster of a story. If some things don't make sense, I shoulder all the blame for my insufficiency in describing the many eloquent emotions this story has brought me.

    Now then, for the review.

    The story starts with an ordinary girl who lives a very extraordinary life. Being the daughter of two very smart scientists gave her an inquisitive mind, and being a child gave her boundless energy. Cat's parents chose not to enroll her in the usual educational facility for her age. This made Cat's early childhood enviable but very different than that of the other children.

    Cat's world became a little more colorful upon the arrival of Finn, a humanoid robot. He became her tutor and constant companion to the point that Cat never thought of him as being any different from her or her parents.

    Through the pages of this book, the reader gradually witnesses Cat's transition into her teenage years and finally, her adulthood. She struggles through life as any normal person do, the main difference is her deep relationship with Finn.

    While it's clear at the onset that Cat and Finn had grown very fond of each other, it's also true that a romantic relationship between a human and an android was simply abnormal. It's ridiculous, completely illogical and taboo, especially since androids were treated more as machines. This was something Cat struggled for years, even until she was married. But of course, she couldn't deny the fact that she was head over heels in love with Finn.

    Just to bring up a logical perspective into the story, yes, an android is technically a machine. It's made of wires, screws and metal parts. No matter how humane it looks, it will never be a human. It's behavior and actions were all programmed and created by man, so it can never be human. In short, an android can't possibly feel any emotion at all, much less love. But in this story, Finn wasn't just an android. He's so much more!

    If I were to describe Finn, I'd say that Finn is an android. He's an android who can lie, an android who can love, and an android who can feel passion.

    “There is nothing else like me in the entire world, said Finn. "That's what you wrote. I'm the only one. I can't tell you what it means to be the only one of my kind," he said. "I can't...There is a lack in myself. But your thesis almost filled it in. It was...a start.” - Finn, The Mad Scientist's Daughter

    Personally, when I began reading the story, I came to loathe it. I loathed it for the simple fact that at the back of my mind, I knew it was going to make me shed tears. And I was right. It made me cry, and I hate crying. But I couldn't stop reading it despite the fact the I loathed it because I simply have to know the ending to Cat and Finn's love story.

    Then came the parts in the story where I felt my heart breaking bit by painful bit. I felt my heart reach out to Cat, but I also couldn't help but mourn for Finn. They are two characters which really hit me straight to the heart! And the odd thing is, if I were to re-live reading the book, I would no doubt, say yes.

    Had I known in the first place just how heartbreaking and angsty this story was, I wouldn't have picked it up. But now that I'm through reading it, I'm glad I did. It's definitely a story that I would carry with me in my favorite list for the rest of my life.

    Just to set the record straight, this isn't the first story I've read about a human girl and an android. The first one was a manga (Japanese comics) by Yuu Watase entitled Zettai Kareshi and premiered in Japan way back in March 2003. I became such a huge fan of the manga that I also watched the live Japanese series (with subs, of course), and even the Taiwanese live series remake. It would suffice to say that in both the manga and the live remakes, I cried buckets of tears. So I wasn't in the least bit surprised when this story made me tear up, too.

    All in all, this story is very engrossing. It's the kind that draws you in with its quiet charm, breaks your heart into pieces, and when everything comes full circle, you'd still love it!

    3 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2014

    Plot spoilers

    Too many plot spoilers revealing every detail of the book then bragging how they got their book for free. Well guess whatk we dont get our book for free and you rude plot spoilers ruin it by revealing everything after you get yours for free. Stop doing that. You do not have to regurgitate the entire book. Bn, please put a stop to these plot spoilers. Ban them, fine them but please put a stop to them.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2014

    So so

    All those people that rate it above four star recieved a free copy for their review, and the book just is not all that good, sorry.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 20, 2013

    This was kind of a strange one. I wasn't overly keen on the writ

    This was kind of a strange one. I wasn't overly keen on the writing style and the way info was imparted. It was very cold, clinical and minimalistic.
    It had elements of AI and Bicentennial Man now and again. The emotional attachment from machine to human, the human connecting with the machine on a personal level and the machine wanting to be more than what it is.
    The relationship between Cat and Finn didn't sit right with me. 
    It wasn't because of the human and robot issue though. What I found slightly dodgy was the fact Finn had been around as a friend, confidante and carer since Cat was a small child. That gave their subsequent romantic relationship a tinge of incest. If Finn had been a male human carer/friend living in the house whilst Cat was growing up, who decides to have a romantic  relationship with the child he has helped to raise, then it would also be considered more than odd. Had the author had Finn join household as an adult male after Cat turns 18 then it wouldn't have that inkling of wrong. Finn acts like a fully grown male in every way. I also felt the whole enjoying the physical aspect via special tap and slap function a little bizarre. 
    Other than that the story actually became more interesting as it went on. Cat and her emotions towards the TinMan are a work in progress. 
    Of course inevitably the issue of whether a robot with human elements is just a new type of human and possibly our future popped up. Can society treat them like tin cans if they are given the ability to can feel emotions like humans do and act upon  those emotions? Or will society always treat them like an advanced microwave with the ability to think independently. 
    I received a copy of this book via NetGalley.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    What an amazing read! Before I purchased this book I was already

    What an amazing read!
    Before I purchased this book I was already a fan of Cassandra Rose Clarke because of her book "The Assassins Curse." When I  looked to see if Clarke had any other books out I ran into this one. At first I was a little skeptical about it; androids aren't really my thing, I don't regret buying this book. I say this a lot, but this time I mean it: This is my favorite book.
    This book is a look through Cat's life-- the scientists daughter. Finn is her tutor and enters her home when she is but a child. The book continues on from there with Cat fearing Finn to learning to love him. This book made me cry from happiness, loss, fear, and love. There were parts where I couldn't put the book down and parts where I set it down in fear of what would happen next. My curiosity would always win out and I would pick the book back up and continue on. 
    "The Mad Scientists Daughter" is 100% worth the time and money. Congrats Cassandra Rose Clarke on creating a masterpiece I will never forget!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 1, 2013

    (I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-re

    (I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to Angry Robot and Netgalley.)
    Cat is 5 years old when she first meets Finn. He’s an android, he doesn’t eat, he doesn’t sleep, and he helps her scientist father with his work. He also tutors Cat instead of her going to school, and he’s her best friend in all the world. As she grows up, she comes to rely on him more than anyone, and misses him when she goes away to college.

    Cat loves Finn, it’s obvious, but as he is ‘incapable of love’ she knows that nothing can ever become of her feelings, and she tries to keep them hidden. One day after the death of her mother however, her feelings escape, and she kisses Finn. Things escalate, and it seems that Finn is more human than she ever considered, and they have sex.

    Cat and Finn can’t really be together though, it’s illegal and immoral, and so she goes back to her normal life. Certain events change things though, and suddenly Finn announces that he is leaving – he’s a machine, not a man, and so he has sold himself to the highest bidder.

    This book tells the tale of Cat’s life, and her love for Finn, even though he is a ‘robot’ rather than a man. Can Cat live without the love of her life though? And if robots are sentient, should they have rights?


    This book was so rich and so emotional; it made me cry on more than one occasion. I really felt for Cat, who loved Finn but kept talking herself out of admitting it, all because she believed that he was incapable of love. She tried to hide her feelings even from herself at times which I found really sad.

    I have to say that even with the story, when Cat and Finn actually had sex for the first time I found it weird. I know that they did have feelings for each other, but she’s asks to have sex with him and he tells her he is capable of it, although obviously he doesn’t get any feeling from it the way she does, and it’s really weird how one-sided the sex was, like, well…. Having sex with a robot!

    I liked Finn strangely enough. He was sweet to Cat, and he did seem to have sentience, and he did seem to have feelings for her, even when he told her that he was incapable of feelings. I also thought that the way he behaved when she was with someone else spoke volumes about how he felt, even if he couldn’t put the feelings into words himself.

    This story covers a large period of time, from when Cat first meets Finn when she is 5, to the end where she is in her 30’s. Parts of the story I liked more than other parts, but the writing throughout was just so captivating, that I wanted to keep reading, even when I wasn’t loving that part of the story.

    The tagline for this book is ‘A tale of love, loss and robots’, and I think that it fits the story really well. The story basically follows Cat’s life from quite a young age, and her background and her love for Finn are a constant background noise within her life, so much so that no matter where she is, she never stops missing him. There is also a lot of loss in this book. I cried on more than one occasion, the story was just so sad in places, but it was so beautifully written that even the sad parts were heartbreakingly good. I actually find it really difficult to tell you how emotionally taxing this book was, and still I loved it, and I’m not going to forget this one in a long time.

    Overall; a beautiful and heartbreaking tale of a girl and a robot.
    8.5 out of 10.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2014

    Odd but endearing

    Different than I expected. Nicely emotional and presents many questions about the nature of being human, without getting over dramatic or too achademic. Enjoyable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2014

    A Fantasy Book

    This writer is more descriptive than I would like. She goes overboard in details.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2014

    Red Dragon: Terrifying and Thrilling

    Harris's novel is an amazing, dark journey through the minds of Will Graham, Hannibal Lecter, and a mad psychologically-wounded killer. Not for the faint of heart (there are graphic scenes involving murder, obviously), Harris penned a novel that gets you into the minds of damaged people, broken and greedy souls and manipulative bastards. Readers will find themselves rooting for Graham, an honest man who is called back to work for the FBI after two families are killed. Will faces his demons in the form of guilt, blood and Lecter himself and though the dialogue in the story can be chilling, it can easily capture your attention. Lecter, though not the main antagonist in this story, is downright scary, and his taunting of both Graham and the reader will leave you with shivers. Harris' writing style is unique but easy to follow and is very enjoyable and addicting. There is a cast of characters that one just can not love, too. The ending may shock you, as it came as a surprise to me, but the book itself is built up on twists and turns. In other words, get ready for a horror, dry-humor filled ride if you read this amazing tale!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 1, 2014

    A little clunky storyline sometimes

    But an enjoyable read overall.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 31, 2014

    Recommended..

    Clarke's book was different. Not what I expected. I'm an old lady but it held my interest and and I enjoyed it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 31, 2014

    Loved it!!!

    This was a very thought-provoking book, and not just because of the AI factor. As a parent, it made me think about the choices we make for our kids to "help" them fit in, and what our approval means to them. I'm an avid reader and have finished at least five other books since I read this, but this is the one I keep thinking about. I don't think there's any higher praise than that!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 31, 2014

    Emotionally charged

    It's a romance, but an uncommon one. It is well written and thought-provoking, and it is relevant to what may become political and humanitarian issues in the not-too-distant future. Turn up your empathy meter and have a wonderful reading experience.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2014

    Wonderful book

    Loved everything about it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2014

    Excellent

    Good read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 15, 2014

    I'm a sucker for "girl falls for robot boy" stories, a

    I'm a sucker for "girl falls for robot boy" stories, and this one was just so beautiful and heartbreaking. It was the kind of book that hurts in a good way to read, the kind that rips you apart and puts you back together again, and I loved every moment of it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2014

    Nice

    I liked this 282 page book. It is very much worth reading. To me, it was a simple, clean, story. Not elaborate, just,simple. This may sound like a strange review but it's an honest one. Enjoy it. I did.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2014

    Read it in an afternoon!

    Really enjoyed this. A love story with a twist!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2014

    Dawne

    Hmmm I guess if I was getting the book for free, I also would leave an outstanding review. But as a poor slob who paid for it, save your money it just wasn't that good.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)