The Madman's Daughter (Madman's Daughter Series #1)

( 69 )

Overview

For fans of Libba Bray, this first book in a gothic suspense trilogy is inspired by H. G. Wells's The Island of Dr. Moreau and has been hailed by New York Times bestseller Carrie Ryan as having "beautiful writing, breakneck pacing, a pulse-pounding mystery, and an irresistible romance."

Following accusations that her scientist father gruesomely experimented on animals, sixteen-year-old Juliet watched as her family and her genteel life in London crumbled around her—and only ...

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The Madman's Daughter (Madman's Daughter Series #1)

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Overview

For fans of Libba Bray, this first book in a gothic suspense trilogy is inspired by H. G. Wells's The Island of Dr. Moreau and has been hailed by New York Times bestseller Carrie Ryan as having "beautiful writing, breakneck pacing, a pulse-pounding mystery, and an irresistible romance."

Following accusations that her scientist father gruesomely experimented on animals, sixteen-year-old Juliet watched as her family and her genteel life in London crumbled around her—and only recently has she managed to piece her world back together. But when Juliet learns her father is still alive and working on a remote tropical island, she is determined to find out if the old accusations are true. Accompanied by her father's handsome young assistant, Montgomery, and an enigmatic castaway, Edward, Juliet travels to the island, only to discover the depths of her father's insanity. Torn between horror and scientific curiosity, Juliet knows she must end her father's dangerous experiments and escape her jungle prison before it's too late. Yet as the island falls into chaos, she discovers the extent of her father's genius—and madness—in her own blood.

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  • The Madman's Daughter
    The Madman's Daughter  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Drawing liberally from The Island of Dr. Moreau, Shepherd debuts with a dark novel, the first in a planned trilogy, which explores many of the themes of the Wells book, including the ethics of scientific experimentation, progress, and civilization. Several characters have parallels in the original—Moreau, the disgraced physiologist; his assistant, Montgomery; and a rescued castaway named Edward. Assuming the role of narrator is 16-year-old Juliet Moreau, who has eked out a living in London following her father’s downfall and mother’s death. When Juliet learns her father is possibly alive, she sets off for the island he escaped to, along with Montgomery, who is recast as a dashing former childhood friend of Juliet’s. At times, the horrors of Moreau’s experimentations take a backseat to the romantic passions that engulf Juliet (“Being so close to a half-naked man—to Montgomery—made me breathless”), as her affections vacillate between Montgomery and the mysterious Edward. Nonetheless, Shepherd’s atmospheric interpretation ought to pull readers in, with unexpected twists and a cliffhanger ending that should leave them craving more. Ages 13–up. Agent: Josh Adams and Quinlan Lee, Adams Literary. (Feb.)
ALA Booklist
“Anyone who doesn’t pick up the next volume is mad!”
Carrie Ryan
“A deft twist on a familiar classic, THE MADMAN’S DAUGHTER has the best of everything: beautiful writing, breakneck pacing, a pulse-pounding mystery, and an irresistible romance.”
Veronica Rossi
“Romantic, haunting, and full of spine-tingling thrills, THE MADMAN’S DAUGHTER kept me reading late into the night.”
Kirkus Reviews
H.G. Wells' The Island of Doctor Moreau, as seen through the eyes of the doctor's daughter. Abandoned by her father and mourning the death of her mother, tough yet prissy Juliet Moreau lives in near-poverty working as a medical school scullery maid in Victorian-era London. When she learns that her father inhabits an island far, far away, where he performs horrific experiments on animals via vivisection, Juliet makes her way there along with Montgomery, her father's assistant, and Edward Prince, a castaway they meet along the way. Naturally, sparks fly among Juliet and the gents, but danger lurks on the island in the form of humanlike creatures--some more ridiculously rendered than others--built from the body parts of animals, the results of Dr. Moreau's experiments. Shepherd takes several liberties in her interpretation of Wells' work, including the insertion of Juliet and the naming of Moreau's creations using Shakespearean characters. The plot moves quickly; in some instances it goes too fast, especially during the voyage from London to the island, when accelerated action forces readers into mental gymnastics. Shepherd excels at worldbuilding in the historical London setting but has trouble fully realizing the landscape of the island. While the chemistry between Juliet and Montgomery spikes instantaneously and believably, the attraction between Prince and Juliet feels more contrived. An unessential but entertaining interpretation. (Science fiction. 13 & up)
ALA Booklist
“Anyone who doesn’t pick up the next volume is mad!”
Carrie Ryan
“A deft twist on a familiar classic, THE MADMAN’S DAUGHTER has the best of everything: beautiful writing, breakneck pacing, a pulse-pounding mystery, and an irresistible romance.”
Veronica Rossi
“Romantic, haunting, and full of spine-tingling thrills, THE MADMAN’S DAUGHTER kept me reading late into the night.”
Children's Literature - Annie Laura Smith
Sixteen-year-old Juliet Moreau's new life in London falls apart when she hears horrible rumors about her father, a respected London doctor. He flees the city for a tropical island, where he performs gruesome experiments that make animals look and act like humans. Her father's rationale is acknowledged to be unclear, and perhaps unknowable: "Whatever it was—his new discovery—it had consumed him enough to abandon everything else in his life. It was more important than his reputation, his wife, even his daughter." Still, Juliet travels to the island in an attempt to determine if her father is a monster as rumored, or a brilliant scientist. If he is the former, she hopes to put an end to his horrific experiments. Juliet's feelings about her findings are strong: "Dead flesh and sharpened scalpels didn't bother me. I was my father's daughter, after all. My nightmares were made of darker things." A love triangle develops between Juliet, her father's servant-turned-assistant Montgomery, and Edward, a castaway they rescue en route to the island. The love triangle is a distraction to a story that should focus more on the horrors Juliet encounters and her relationship with her father. An intriguing plot twist brings the story to a close. H.G. Wells' The Island of Dr. Moreau is the inspiration for The Madman's Daughter. This novel is part of a trilogy which includes Her Dark Curiosity and a third story yet to be released. The Madman's Daughter is a compelling gothic thriller, although the scenes of animal cruelty are quite explicit. Film rights have been optioned by Paramount Pictures. Reviewer: Annie Laura Smith
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—Based on H.G. Wells's The Island of Dr. Moreau and told from the point of view of the mad doctor's 16-year-old daughter, this dark novel blends the basic premise of the original with new insights, characters, and terror. Dr. Moreau fled London to escape scandal and possible arrest, leaving his wife and daughter destitute. When her mother dies, Juliet has just enough money to survive until she is fired from her hospital cleaning job for rebuffing the advances of one of the doctors. She runs into her old friend and her father's assistant, Montgomery, and convinces him to take her to her father's island. The perilous trip on a pirate ship and the rescue of Edward, a castaway, ends with a very cold welcome from her father, who grudgingly allows her to stay. Over time, Juliet realizes that everything she has heard about him creating strange semi-human creatures is true. The teen must face dangers, uncover the secrets behind her origin, and unravel her feelings about Moreau's experiments. The fast-paced book is rife with excitement, romance, and intrigue. Juliet is both a strong heroine who can take charge and a young woman who is beset by doubts and rash acts. Dr. Moreau is thoroughly detestable and Montgomery and Edward are handsome, flawed, and mysterious. The surprising ending is satisfying. While knowledge of Wells's novel would perhaps lead to a more satisfying reading experience, this title stands alone.—Janet Hilbun, Texas Women's University, Denton, TX
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062128027
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/29/2013
  • Series: Madman's Daughter Series , #1
  • Pages: 420
  • Sales rank: 153,957
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • Lexile: HL640L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.92 (w) x 8.32 (h) x 1.33 (d)

Meet the Author

Megan Shepherd grew up in her family's independent bookstore in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The travel bug took her from London to Timbuktu and many places in between, though she ended up back in North Carolina with her husband and two cats, and she wouldn't want to live anywhere else. The Madman's Daughter and Her Dark Curiosity are her first novels.

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Read an Excerpt

The Madman's Daughter


By Megan Sheperd

HarperCollins Publishers

Copyright © 2013 Megan Sheperd
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-06-212802-7


Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

The basement halls in King's College of Medical Research were dark, even in the daytime. At night they were like a grave.

Rats crawled through corridors that dripped with cold perspiration. The chill in the sunken rooms kept the specimens from rotting and numbed my own flesh, too, through the worn layers of my dress. When I cleaned those rooms, late at night after the medical students had gone home to their warm beds, the sound of my hard-bristle brush echoed in the operating theater, down the twisting halls, into the storage spaces where they kept the things of nightmares. Other people's nightmares, that is. Dead flesh and sharpened scalpels didn't bother me. I was my father's daughter, after all. My nightmares were made of darker things.

My brush paused against the mortar, frozen by a familiar sound from down the hall: the unwelcome tap-tap-tap of footsteps that meant Dr. Hastings had stayed late. I scrubbed harder, furiously, but blood had a way of seeping into the tiles so not even hours of work could get them clean. The footsteps came closer until they stopped right behind me.

"How's it coming, then, Juliet?" His warm breath brushed the back of my neck.

Keep your eyes down, I told myself, scouring the bloodstained squares of mortar so hard that my own knuckles bled.

"Well, Doctor." I kept it short, hoping he would leave, but he didn't.

Overhead the electric bulbs snapped and clicked. I glanced at the silver tips of his shoes, so brightly polished that I could see the reflection of his balding scalp and milky eyes watching me. He wasn't the only professor who worked late, or the only one whose gaze lingered too long on my bent-over backside. But the smell of lye and other chemicals on my clothes deterred the others. Dr. Hastings seemed to relish it.

He slipped his pale fingers around my wrist. I dropped the brush in surprise. "Your knuckles are bleeding," he said, pulling me to my feet.

"It's the cold. It chaps my skin." I tried to tug my hand back, but he held firm. "It's nothing."

His eyes followed the sleeve of my muslin dress to the stained apron and frayed hem, a dress that not even my father's poorest servants would have worn. But that was many years ago, when we lived in the big house on Belgrave Square, where my closet burst with furs and silks and soft lacy things I'd worn only once or twice, since Mother threw out the previous year's fashions like bathwater.

That was before the scandal.

Now, men seldom looked at my clothes for long. When a girl fell from privilege, men were less interested in her ratty skirts than in what lay underneath, and Dr. Hastings was no different. His eyes settled on my face. My friend Lucy told me I looked like the lead actress at the Brixton, a Frenchwoman with high cheekbones and skin pale as bone, even paler against the dark, straight hair she wore swept up in a Swiss-style chignon. I kept my own hair in a simple braid, though a few strands always managed to slip out. Dr. Hastings reached up to tuck them behind my ear, his fingers rough as parchment against my temple. I cringed inside but fought to keep my face blank. Better to give no reaction so he wouldn't be encouraged. But my shaking hands betrayed me.

Dr. Hastings smiled thinly. The tip of his tongue snaked out from between his lips.

Suddenly the sound of groaning hinges made him startle. My heart pounded wildly at this chance to slip away. Mrs. Bell, the lead maid, stuck her gray head through the cracked door. Her mouth curved in its perpetual frown as her beady eyes darted between the professor and me. I'd never been so glad to see her wrinkled face.

"Juliet, out with you," she barked. "Mary's gone and broken a lamp, and we need another set of hands."

I stepped away from Dr. Hastings, relief rolling off me like a cold sweat. My eyes met Mrs. Bell's briefly as I slipped into the hall. I knew that look. She couldn't watch out for me all the time.

One day, she might not be there to intercede.

The moment I was free of those dark hallways, I dashed into the street toward Covent Garden as the moon hovered low over London's skyline. The harsh wind bit at my calves through worn wool stockings as I waited for a carriage to pass. Across the street a figure stood in the lee of the big wooden bandstand's staircase.

"You awful creature," Lucy said, slipping out of the shadows. She hugged the collar of her fur coat around her long neck. Her cheeks and nose were red beneath a light sheen of French powder. "I've been waiting an hour." "I'm sorry." I leaned in and pressed my cheek to hers. Her parents would be horrified to know she had snuck out to meet me. They had encouraged our friendship when Father was London's most famous surgeon, but were quick to forbid her to see me after his banishment.

Luckily for me, Lucy loved to disobey.

"They've had me working late all week opening up some old rooms," I said. "I'll be cleaning cobwebs out of my hair for days."

She pretended to pluck something distasteful from my hair and grimaced. We both laughed. "Honestly, I don't know how you can stand that work, with the rats and beetles and, my God, whatever else lurks down there." Her blue eyes gleamed mischievously. "Anyway, come on. The boys are courtyard to a redbrick building with a stone staircase. Lucy banged the horse-head knocker twice.

The door swung open, and a young man with thick chestnut hair and a fine suit appeared. He had Lucy's same fair skin and wide-set eyes, so this must be the cousin she'd told me about. I timidly evaluated his tall forehead, the helix of his ears that projected only a hair too far from the skull. Good-looking, I concluded. He studied me wordlessly in return, in my third-hand coat, with worn elbows and frayed satin trim, that must have looked so out of place next to Lucy's finely tailored one. But to his credit, his grin didn't falter for a moment. She must have warned him she was bringing a street urchin and not to say anything rude. "Let us in, Adam," Lucy said, pushing past him. "My toes are freezing to the street."

I slipped in behind her. Shrugging off her coat, she said, "Adam, this is the friend I've told you about. Not a penny to her name, can't cook, but God, just look at her." My face went red, and I shot Lucy a withering look, but Adam only smiled. "Lucy's nothing if not blunt," he said. "Don't worry, I'm used to it. I've heard far worse come out of her mouth. And she's right, at least about the last part." I jerked my head toward him, expecting a leer. But he was being sincere, which only left me feeling more at a loss for words.

"Where are they?" Lucy asked, ignoring us. A bawdy roar spilled from a back room, and Lucy grinned and headed toward the sound. I expected Adam to follow her. But his gaze found me instead. He smiled again.

Startled, I paused a second too long. This was new. No vulgar winks, no glances at my chest. I was supposed to say something pleasant. But instead I drew a breath in, like a secret I had to keep close. I knew how to handle cruelty, not kindness.

"May I take your coat?" he asked. I realized I had my arms wrapped tightly around my chest, though it was pleasantly warm inside the house.

I forced my arms apart and slid the coat off. "Thank you." My voice was barely audible.

We followed Lucy down the hall to a sitting room where a group of lanky medical students reclined on leather sofas, sipping glasses of honey-colored liquid. Winter examinations had just ended, and they were clearly deep into their celebration. This was the kind of thing Lucy adored - breaking up a boys' club, drinking gin and playing cards and reveling in their shocked faces. She got away with it under the pretense of visiting her cousin, though this was a far step from the elderly aunt's parlor where Lucy was supposed to be meeting him.

Adam stepped forward to join the crowd, laughing at something someone said. I tried to feel at ease in the unfamiliar crowd, too aware of my shabby dress and chapped hands. Smile, Mother would have whispered. You belonged among these people, once. But first I needed to gauge how drunk they were, the lay of the room, who was most likely not to laugh at my poor clothes. Analyzing, always analyzing - I couldn't feel safe until I knew every aspect of what I was facing.

Mother had been so confident around other people, always able to talk about the church sermon that morning, about the rising price of coffee. But I'd taken after my father when it came to social situations. Awkward. Shy. More apt to study the crowd like some social experiment than to join in. Lucy had tucked herself on the sofa between a blond haired boy and one with a face as red as an apple. A half empty rum bottle dangled from her graceful fingers. When she saw me hanging back in the doorway, she stood and sauntered over.

"The sooner you find a husband," she growled playfully, "the sooner you can stop scrubbing floors. So pick one of them and say something charming."

I swallowed. My eyes drifted to Adam. "Lucy, men like these don't marry girls like me."

"You haven't the faintest idea what men want. They don't want some snobbish porridge-faced brat plucking at needlepoint all day."

"Yes, but I'm a maid."

"A temporary situation." She waved it away, as if my last few years of backbreaking work were nothing more than a lark. She jabbed me in the side. "You come from money. From class. So show a little."

She held the bottle out to me. I wanted to tell her that sipping rum straight from a bottle wasn't exactly showing class, but I'd only earn myself another jab.

I glanced at Adam. I'd never been good at guessing people's feelings. I had to study their reactions instead. And in this situation, it didn't take much to conclude I wasn't what these men wanted, despite Lucy's insistence.

But maybe I could pretend to be. Hesitantly, I took a sip.

The blond boy tugged Lucy to the sofa next to him. "You must help us end a debate, Miss Radcliffe. Cecil says the human body contains two hundred ten bones, and I say two hundred eleven."

Lucy batted her pretty lashes. "Well, I'm sure I don't know."

I sighed and leaned into the door frame.

The boy took her chin in his hand. "If you'll be so good as to hold still, I'll count, and we can find our answer." He touched a finger to her skull. "One." I rolled my eyes as the boy dropped his finger lower, to her shoulder bones. "Two. And three." His finger ran slowly, seductively, along her clavicle. "Four." Then his finger traced even lower, to the thin skin covering her breastbone. "Five," he said, so drawn out that I could smell the rum on his breath.

I cleared my throat. The other boys watched, riveted, as the boy's finger drifted lower and lower over Lucy's neckline. Why not just skip the pretense and grab her breast? Lucy was no better, giggling like she was enjoying it. Exasperated, I slapped his pasty hand off her chest.

The whole room went still.

"Wait your turn, darling," the boy said, and they all laughed. He turned back to Lucy, holding up that ridiculous finger.

"Two hundred six," I said.

This got their attention. Lucy took the bottle from my hand and fell back against the leather sofa with an exasperated sigh.

"I beg your pardon?" the boy said.

"Two hundred six," I repeated, feeling my cheeks warm. "There are two hundred six bones in the body. I would think, as a medical student, you would know that." Lucy's head shook at my hopelessness, but her lips cracked in a smile regardless. The blond boy's mouth went slack.

I continued before he could think. "If you doubt me, tell me how many bones are in the human hand." The boys took no offense at my remark. On the contrary, they seemed all the more drawn to me for it. Maybe I was the kind of girl they wanted, after all.

Lucy's only acknowledgment was an approving tip of the rum bottle in my direction.

"I'll take that wager," Adam interrupted, leveling his handsome green eyes at me.

Lucy jumped up and wrapped her arm around my shoulders. "Oh, good! And what's the wager, then? I'll not have Juliet risk her reputation for less than a kiss."

I immediately turned red, but Adam only grinned.

"My prize, if I am right, shall be a kiss. And if I am wrong -" "If you are wrong" - I interjected, feeling reckless; I grabbed the rum from Lucy and tipped the bottle back, letting the liquid warmth chase away my insecurity - "you must call on me wearing a lady's bonnet."

He walked around the sofa and took the bottle. The confidence in his step told me he didn't intend to lose. He set the bottle on the side table and skimmed his forefinger tantalizingly along the delicate bones in the back of my hand. I parted my lips, curling my toes to keep from jerking my hand away. This wasn't Dr. Hastings, I told myself. Adam was hardly shoving his hand down my neckline. It was just an innocent touch.

"Twenty-four," he said.

I felt a triumphant swell. "Wrong. Twenty-seven."

Lucy gave my leg a pinch and I remembered to smile. This was supposed to be flirtatious. Fun.

Adam's eyes danced devilishly. "And how would a girl know such things?"

I straightened. "Whether I'm right or wrong has nothing to do with gender." I paused. "Also, I'm right." Adam smirked. "Girls don't study science."

My confidence faltered. I knew how many bones there were in the human hand because I was my father's daughter. When I was a child, Father would give physiology lessons to our servant boy, Montgomery, to spite those who claimed the lower classes were incapable of learning. He considered women naturally deficient, however, so I would hide in the laboratory closet during lessons.
(Continues...)


Excerpted from The Madman's Daughter by Megan Sheperd. Copyright © 2013 by Megan Sheperd. Excerpted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 69 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(37)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(10)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(6)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 69 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 21, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This book was so good that the author had me gasping out loud in

    This book was so good that the author had me gasping out loud in some parts. I literally got extremely angry during parts and everyone around me couldn't figure out why I was so mad. A good book/author makes you emotional.

    16 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 29, 2013

    I received an ARC of this novel and it was fast reading. Teens a

    I received an ARC of this novel and it was fast reading. Teens and some adults will be entertained by this fast-paced period fiction with its elements of Stephen King and Dean Koontz in that it mixes reality with fantasy and horror. Moves at a fast clip. I withheld the fifth star because I thought the author tried to jam too many elements into the story at the expense of developing setting and some characters.
    The London setting is well done, the island, not so much.

    15 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 4, 2013

    Dark, gothic, absolutely mesmerising. I could barely put this bo

    Dark, gothic, absolutely mesmerising. I could barely put this book down, and when I had to, I spent the day walking around in a daze, trying to imagine what might be coming next.




    Reveal after reveal left me stumbling out into the light blinking by the last page. This is an intelligent, original story that truly brought home to me the meaning of 'atmospheric'. It will linger with you, and you'll love it.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 30, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Very good

    You have a girl, a scandal, meets a familiar face from the past and travel to an island. Liking historical fiction and retellings, this sounded pretty good. The writing style was one of my favorite parts of the book. The pace while good, slowed down at times but I didn't feel bored. And I like that it brought things up after it being mentioned. Nice continuity for once. What I didn't like was the whole comparing Edward and Montgomery. I don't mind love triangles but it depends. Now they're everywhere it seems. I'll admit there were moments I didn't see coming. Like the ending for example. Oh the ending. I was like, What? Wait, what? Very good read.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    A Definite Read...

    Thoroughly enjoyed "The Madman's Daughter" and can hardly wait for the second in the trilogy!

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2013

    an amazing book!

    I absolutely loved this book. I hope with all my heart there is a 2nd book. The end had me crying and other parts had me yelling and annoyed and excited and i fell in love with the characters. I feel close to the main character because u think like that sometimes demented just saying hell to it and doing what i want. I would and will read it over again a million times and if there was a second i would buy it the day it came out

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    To: Jezzman

    Jezzman: I read your "review" and I just want to say, Erotica is not the only kind of writing. And books can have romance even if it's not the "playing in the bed naked" type. Seriously, try reading a GOOD novel with GOOD writing, and get your head out of the gutter for once.

    3 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 21, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I was interested in reading author Megan Shepherd¿s The Madman¿s

    I was interested in reading author Megan Shepherd’s The Madman’s Daughter after I finished with the indie horror game Mad Father. I read that the book was as dark and disturbing as Mad Father and that fans of the game would fall in love with The Madman’s Daughter. So naturally I had to start reading The Madman’s Daughter and I wish with every fibre in my being that I had gotten to read the novel earlier! It was fantastic! Brilliant! Definitely one of my favorite reads of all time.

    The Madman’s Daughter is inspired by The Island of Doctor Moreau and follows sixteen year old Juliet Moreau who has been living in London and working as a maid ever since her mother died and her father disappeared. There are dark rumors surrounding her father involving his experiments that were gruesome and may or may not have involved butchery. It’s not until Juliet comes across a piece of paper with her father’s name literally right on it that she comes across Montgomery, her childhood friend and ex-servant, that she discovers her father is still alive.

    Going with Montgomery all the way to an island off of Australia along with a castaway named Edward, Juliet finds herself on an island where her father has declared himself God and has created the island’s inhabitants by experimenting on animals to turn them into disfigured creatures that are made to look like (and act like) humans. Juliet is both disgusted and intrigued by what her father has done but he knows that in the end she must stop her father for what he’s doing is wrong and against everything he should believe in. Trapped on the island, Juliet learns that there is a dangerous monster lurking in the forest that is killing off the inhabitants and that Montgomery and her father may be keeping secrets that will change her forever.

    The first thing I noticed about The Madman’s Daughter that made me fall in love with it was the writing style. Right off the hop from the first four pages I got a feel for just how dark the novel would be. Shepherd’s writing brought everything to life. I could see the foliage on the island, I could see just how disfigured the island’s inhabitants were. I could imagine the scent of London and the feel of Juliet injecting herself with her needle every day. Her writing was out of this world and detailed to the point where everything just played out for me like a movie. I absolutely adored it.

    The Madman’s Daughter does have a love triangle between Edward, Juliet and Montgomery. Personally I really enjoyed it because it wasn’t the main focus and it wasn’t something that was being shoved down your throat. Readers will actually be able to enjoy this love triangle. Just as Juliet discovers more about the island, herself and the secrets clouding both Edward and Montgomery’s readers will be cheering on one romance more than the other. What I really liked was that the romance in the novel didn’t overpower the actual plot which focuses on Juliet, the island and her father’s evil genius.

    The plot is one that kept me guessing until the very end. I was so in love with everything that happened to Juliet and everything that she learned while on the island. From when the novel starts and she is saved from Dr. Hastings to the ending that left me screaming (literally screaming)—I was absolutely in love with this read. I cannot wait for the sequel and for those of you who have read this novel you know that with that ending anybody would want to know what happens next to Juliet.

    I would recommend The Madman’s Daughter to readers who are looking for a novel that will keep them reading until the very last page, fans of romance and readers who want a novel with an ending so unexpected and crazy that they’ll be left begging for a sequel.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2013

    This was such a great, dark story filled with mischeif   and may

    This was such a great, dark story filled with mischeif   and mayhem! But then I got to the ending....Horrid! Don't read this book unless you like horrid endings-IM SERIOUS!!!!!!

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2013

    excellent

    Anazing book. I absolutely enjoyed it. A must read

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2014

    I don't typically find myself reading YA gothic novels, but I re

    I don't typically find myself reading YA gothic novels, but I read the synopsis for this one and I was intrigued. When it said that Shepherd had based her book off of Wells' novel, I knew that it would be interesting. I was not disappointed. I will warn anyone that scares easily--do not read this at night. It is definitely a spooky read. Overall, I really enjoyed the character development. Every time I thought I had a character figured out, I was shocked by a new revelation. To anyone wanting to read this because it's supposed to have a romance, you're wasting your time. You won't find cheap, erotic fiction. If you're looking for an interesting read set in the 19th century, and if you don't mind the sci-fi story, this is for you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 20, 2014

    Hmmm...Where do I start with this review? The Madman's Daughter

    Hmmm...Where do I start with this review? The Madman's Daughter was unlike anything I have ever read before. I devoured it in a matter of days and was left in a state of awe. I wanted more....immediately. 




    I also have a weakness for a beautiful cover....and this cover is breath-taking. It is simple and yet has so much meaning. Juliet is beautifully portrayed in a white gown with red ribbons , her long black hair wild and windblown and is walking barefoot along the shore. She looks captivating and lost all at the same time...




    The synopsis of the story states that this is somewhat of a retelling of The Island of Dr Moreau. So this told me immediately that there would be plenty of creepiness and secrets involved in this book and WOW was I right. The creepy factor is HIGH in this book and is exactly what makes it so good. 




    The main character, Juliet, is so strong and intense. She is a heroine who has the skills and the want to survive in a world unlike any other. She is orphaned at a young age and placed into the work system in order to survive. Her father was a world renowned surgeon who is found to be "psychotic" and disowned from his life and the people around him. Her mother died of a illness while Juliet was still young. Juliet watched her father perform surgeries and learned everything that she knows about the medical field from his teachings. 




    "When I cleaned those rooms, late at night after the medical students had gone home to their warm bed, the sound of my hard-bristle brush echoed in the operation theater, down the twisting halls, into the storage spaces where they kept the things of nightmares. Other peoples nightmares, that is. Dead flesh and sharpened scalpels didn't bother me. I was my father's daughter, after all. My nightmares were made of darker things."




    Juliet uncovers the fact that her father is still alive and so she sets off on a journey to the mysterious island where he has taken refuge to try and get some answers to her past as well as her future. She is accompanied by her fathers assistant, Montgomery. I absolutely adore Montgomery. He is kind, compassionate, and yet dangerous in his own way. 




    "I knew what he wanted to say. He loved me. He loved the half-mad, filthy girl standing in a pool of formaldehyde."




    Juliet discovers so many mysteries and horrors when she arrives on the island. This is such a high-paced book and I could not stop turning the pages. Every chapter is a new adventure and a new secret come to life. It was just phenomenal. It was everything that I love in a book...survival, romance, mystery, and action...LOTS OF ACTION.




    I literally cannot wait to get my hands on the sequel to find out what is in store for Juliet next...I mean I can seriously only imagine...Megan Shepherd is an author to watch for..She is a phenomenal writer and knows how to write in order to keep the reader attached to the story till the very last page...WOW....Just incredible...

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 3, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Let me say what I really, really reeeallly liked it. I liked th

    Let me say what I really, really reeeallly liked it. I liked the plot, the whole theme and sub themes of the novel. It is so well built, I just felt like hugging Megan Shepherd at certain points (and it's rare for me to say that about an author) Really, THAT great! It has every element you would look for in a Gothic sounding historical fiction; it has the element of mystery, the touch of horror, a world full of possibilities and impossibilities, along with the not-so-absent theme of love and romance. Uh, yes, that reminds me why I gave it a 4.5, I am not a big fan of triangle (or any angled) love stories. I'm more of a straight line person..On the two sides a boy and a girl work just fine for me. I'm a peace-loving person you see, what's the need of an unnecessary heartbreak? (Of course, a girl always loves attention, the more the better ;)) So if you are a deep fan of triangle-ish love stories and movies and cry your heart out when the cool guys (or the hot guys depending on your taste) don't seem to find anybody else (for instance, you) to like and love other than the only one lead, this book is what you are looking for. Go get it tiger!...okay that was a wrong expression..but never mind, again :p
    Moving on from the mushy gushy romantic part to other things, I liked the mystery element. I've always loved good mystery reads. And yet, I have found very few books that are actually worth reading and recommending. This book, I suggest, is definitely worth a try, specially if you are a sucker for mystery like me!
    Now the female lead, Juliet Moreau. When I had read the blurb, I remember feeling immediately sorry for her. A crazy psychotic experimenting father? Poor girl. How is she supposed to deal with it? But I was wrong. Juliet definitely isn't some damsel-in-distress, a poor life fallen into a sudden tempest. She is what I usually like in a heroine. She's smart, sensible, independent, strong enough to keep her head calm after the life altering revelations. Even her efforts to prove her worth to her father is very commendable.
    On that note, I really didn't like Dr. Moreau at first. In fact, I hated him for being such a sexist at times. Okay, I see that Juliet is a 'complication' to his experiments, his 'blissful life of solitude', but come on! She is his daughter right? He can't just be such a male chauvinist a** to her! *sulk* But yes, I couldn't hate him for long, though I often felt like throwing him off from a rooftop. Author Megan Shepherd has created a character so unique in itself that you cannot help liking it for it's uniqueness.

    And then, the boys. Rarely in my life have I liked two boys in one book at once. In Twilight,I was Team un-Edward (that left me no choice other than being a Team Jacob though I didn't even like him that way, I liked none there:\). But here, I developed a soft corner for both Edward and Montgomery. Okay, maybe a little more for the latter, specially after seeing his efforts to convince Juliet of his change of heart (does that sound more religious?). But Edward was good, I'm not saying he was good in a good way; I mean he was, but then he was like....okay that's confusing but you'll know once you read it, and I believe you would be surprised to see his character sketch till the end as well;)

    To balance it off a little, I often felt at some points the novel was a tiny bit dragging the plot. Now I guess, when you have planned to do a trilogy, it's something that automatically comes. So I'm okay with it, because the plot is indeed interesting and I look forward to read the next books.

    I have never read The Island of Dr. Moreau by H G Wells, the book that is said to be an inspiration for this book. And now I'm afraid to read that, as I don't want to let go of the feeling this book had given me. Okay, I may still give it a try, but not now. I'm having a Madman Hangover @_@

    The ending was one of the best parts of the book. The kind of ending that leaves you craving for more. And when it's a trilogy, you cannot help praying that the second book in series comes out soon, before you die out of anticipation. And now that I know the second one is going to be out soon, you can easily imagine the Madman ion I am charged with (do I sound like a chemistry student? I'm so not one)!

    On a finishing note, I would say I haven't read a book with so deep a theme so successfully woven into a plot. If you love to have a great historical fiction in your hands, this is it. If you love a love triangle that offers a nice plot without butchering the main storyline, this is it. If you love Frankenstein, this is it. If you love The Tempest, this is it. If you love The Mysterious Island, this is it. Forget everything...if you just love books unconditionally, then THIS IS IT. Period.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2013

    For the hell of it read this book!!!!!

    I didn't know what to expect from it when I first began this book but I was hooked. It was too good to place down. There was so many parts that I just didn't expect and gave me chills. I absolutely believe that anyone who has an interest in paranormal romance should pick up this and read it.
    It doesn't just revolve around the romance, there are action parts and many other suspenseful parts that will make you unable to stop reading. I couldn't put this book down, and when I did I couldn't stop thinking about it.
    This was beautifully writen and completely brillant. I wasn't to pleased with the ending but I still loved it anyway! XD

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2013

    A+

    Excellant quick read. Detailed

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    highly recommended very different

    very good hard to put down

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    Amazing

    I loved this book! I couldn't put it down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 7, 2013

    Excellent

    A Great read, didn't want to put this book down, and didn't want it to end! Will not disappoint

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2013

    Best book I ever read!

    Its a very unique story with lots of twists. Its a slow start but once you get to the island you wont be able to put this book down. Definitely a must read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2013

    Intense

    Strong character details with a underlining love story. Hard to put down once you got into it.
    You feel for the main character Juliet while trying to figure out the mystery! It is like jeckle and hyde on an island.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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